Application of Advanced Plasma Technology in Coatings, Films and Etching

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Plasma Coatings, Surfaces & Interfaces".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2024 | Viewed by 3662

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Center for Low-Temperature Plasma Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan
Interests: plasma etching (high-aspect ratio contact etching, atomic-layer etching and low-temperature etching); plasma diagnositics and simulation; magnetic materials (permanet hard magnetic thin films, recording media and exchange bias); X-ray based techniques (synchotron radiation, X-ray diffraction, X-ray reflectivity, X-ray absorption and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy); thin-film stress; surface finishing for anticorrosion
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plasma techniques have revolutionized the fields of materials science, enabling coatings, films and etching in a wide range of areas in surface engineering. The advanced plasma techniques have greatly contributed to the field of nanofabrication by allowing the precise control of nano-scale materials. With these plasma-based techniques, it is possible to deposite or etch thin films of various nano-scale materials for applications of nanoelectronics, photovoltaic and biosensors. Spurred primarily by the growing applications ranging from advanced logic devices, flash memory and magnetoresistive random access memory, nano-electromechanical systems, energy devices, etc., new processes, instruments, diagnostic techniques, and deposition and etching mechanisms are required. Accordingly, we are launching this Special Issue of Coatings that will focus on the fundamentals and applications of advanced plasma techniques for coating, films and etching in addressing the covered subjects.

This Special Issue will collect original research articles and review papers that include, but are not limited to, the following areas:

  • Theoretical, modeling and experimental research, knowledge and new ideas in plasma source, pulsed plasma techniques and radiation sources;
  • Atomic layer processing (ALD/ALE);
  • Dry etching technologies with low-pressure and atmospheric plasmas;
  • Plasma deposition of functional coatings and finishings;
  • High-pressure and thermal plasma processing;
  • Surface reaction and damage with plasma;
  • Nanofabrication and nanodevices using plasma-based techniques;
  • Plasma processing for biomaterial, medical, energy and sensor applications;
  • Plasma processing for new material devices (MRAM, power devices, organics, etc.).

Dr. Shih-Nan Hsiao
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advanced plasma process for coatings
  • atomic layer etching and high-aspect ratio contact etching
  • plasma-induced damage
  • plasma diagnostics
  • etching modeling

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

8 pages, 2444 KiB  
Article
Oxidation and Heat Shock Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed TiC-CoNi Composite Coatings at 900 °C
by Jining He, Baoqiang Li, Hongjian Zhao, Guanya Fu, Jiawei Fan and Yanfang Qin
Coatings 2024, 14(3), 296; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14030296 - 28 Feb 2024
Viewed by 666
Abstract
In this work, the TiC-reinforced CoNi alloy coatings were prepared by the plasma spraying method. Their microstructure, high-temperature oxidation, and thermal shock resistance at 900 °C were studied. The results showed that the CoNi alloy coating exhibited a single phase (c-Co-Ni-Cr-Mo). After adding [...] Read more.
In this work, the TiC-reinforced CoNi alloy coatings were prepared by the plasma spraying method. Their microstructure, high-temperature oxidation, and thermal shock resistance at 900 °C were studied. The results showed that the CoNi alloy coating exhibited a single phase (c-Co-Ni-Cr-Mo). After adding Ti-graphite mixed powders, the sprayed coating exhibited TiC and TiO2 phases, besides the c-Co-Ni-Cr-Mo matrix phase. For CoNi alloy coating, the main oxidation products were Cr2O3 and CoCr2O4 (NiCr2O4). For TiC-CoNi alloy coating, the main oxidation products were the TiO2 phase, coupled with Cr2O3 and CoCr2O4 (NiCr2O4) phases. The content of oxides increased with the oxidation time. The oxidation weight gain of the TiC-CoNi composite coating was slightly higher than that of the CoNi alloy coating. The formation of TiC could improve the thermal shock resistance of the CoNi alloy coating. Full article
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11 pages, 3323 KiB  
Article
Influence of the Annealing Environment on the Structure and Ferroelectric Properties of Lead Titanate Thin Films
by Aleksandras Iljinas, Vytautas Stankus and Liutauras Marcinauskas
Coatings 2024, 14(1), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14010058 - 30 Dec 2023
Viewed by 835
Abstract
Lead titanate thin films of pyrochlore phase were deposited using layer-by-layer reactive magnetron sputtering on a heated platinized silicon substrate. It was found that the pyrochlore phase transition to the perovskite phase was initiated at 700 °C, and the properties of the PbTiO [...] Read more.
Lead titanate thin films of pyrochlore phase were deposited using layer-by-layer reactive magnetron sputtering on a heated platinized silicon substrate. It was found that the pyrochlore phase transition to the perovskite phase was initiated at 700 °C, and the properties of the PbTiO3 films could be controlled by changing the annealing environment. The thin films annealed in air and oxygen environments (1.33 Pa) have a tetragonal structure. The highest values of remnant polarization and the coercive field were 38 μC/cm2 and 130 kV/cm, respectively, but the largest dielectric loss was determined for the films annealed in air. The remnant polarization, coercive field and dielectric loss were reduced when the annealing of films was performed using oxygen gas at 1.33 Pa pressure. The films annealed in vacuum showed a rhombohedral (and ferroelectric) structure with the lowest remnant polarization and coercive field values. Such a structure was not observed for lead titanate at room temperature. It was observed that the surface morphology strongly depended on the reaction rate, which was influenced by the oxygen concentration in the environment. Full article
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17 pages, 7995 KiB  
Article
High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputter-Deposited Chromium-Based Coatings for Corrosion Protection
by Yen-Chun Liu, Shih-Nan Hsiao, Ying-Hung Chen, Ping-Yen Hsieh and Ju-Liang He
Coatings 2023, 13(12), 2101; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13122101 - 18 Dec 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 896
Abstract
The use of high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) to deposit chromium-based thin films on brass substrates for the purpose of corrosion-protective coating was investigated. By varying the process parameters (pulse frequency, pulse width and N2 flow rate) and structure design, including single-layer [...] Read more.
The use of high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) to deposit chromium-based thin films on brass substrates for the purpose of corrosion-protective coating was investigated. By varying the process parameters (pulse frequency, pulse width and N2 flow rate) and structure design, including single-layer and multilayer structures, the obtained results revealed that the Cr-N films deposited through the use of HIPIMS exhibited higher film density and corrosion resistance compared to traditional direct-current magnetron sputtering. Based on the results of a field test using copper-accelerated acetic acid solution, the Cr-N film with a multilayered structure can further extend the time to corrosion onset. This is because the bottom layer in the multilayer structure can block structural defects in the layer above it, effectively reducing the penetration of corrosive agents into the substrate. The high bias voltage, coupled with increased temperature during deposition, led to a dezincification effect, resulting in the reduced adhesion of the film to the substrate and decreased overall corrosion resistance. Full article
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17 pages, 7792 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Plasma Spray Parameters on the Quality of Al-Ni Coatings
by Shenglian Wang, Shuang Chen, Ming Liu, Qinghua Huang, Zimo Liu, Xin Li and Shaofeng Xu
Coatings 2023, 13(12), 2063; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13122063 - 09 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 989
Abstract
The plasma spray method is widely utilized for enhancing wear, surface fatigue, and corrosion properties through coating. The mechanical and surface characteristics of the resulting coating are contingent upon various spraying parameters, including arc current, working current, spraying distance, and plasma gun traversing [...] Read more.
The plasma spray method is widely utilized for enhancing wear, surface fatigue, and corrosion properties through coating. The mechanical and surface characteristics of the resulting coating are contingent upon various spraying parameters, including arc current, working current, spraying distance, and plasma gun traversing speed. This study investigates the impact of these manufacturing parameters on the porosity, hardness, and bond strength of a coating produced from an Al-Ni alloy applied to a Q235 steel substrate. An extensive experimental program was conducted to analyze the influence of these parameters on the coating properties. Consequently, a preferred combination of parameters, identified through a comprehensive evaluation method, yielded greater performance benefits compared to the orthogonal experimental groups. Full article
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