Current Trends in Coatings for Gas Sensors

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Surface Engineering for Energy Harvesting, Conversion, and Storage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 1513

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of Limpopo, Private Bag X1106, Sovenga 0727, South Africa
Interests: chemical gas sensing; photocatalysis; energy storage and applications; strong and smart materials

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Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Interests: gas sensors and organic solar cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of film-coated devices for monitoring gaseous pollutants in indoor and outdoor environments such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbon monoxide, ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide are widely deployed for this purpose. Efforts are being made to improve the performance of these air quality sensors. Current trends in gas sensing have recently received increased attention due to climate change. Global air quality is closely linked to the Earth's climate and ecosystems. Many sources of air pollution, such as burning fossil fuels, are also sources of greenhouse gas emissions. This Special Issue considers strategies for simultaneously reducing these emissions and improving air quality monitoring in living and working environments. It is important to reduce the burden of disease-related health problems caused by these harmful and dangerous air pollutants.  

In particular, the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Sensors.
  • Nano- and/or micro-scale multiphysics devices for gas detection and monitoring.
  • Miniaturized novel chemical sensors.
  • Biosensors and electronic nose.
  • Electrical transducers.
  • Gas sensing principle.

Dr. Steven Solethu Nkosi
Prof. Dr. David Edmond Motaung
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sensors
  • nano- and/or micro-scale multiphysics devices for gas detection and monitoring
  • miniaturized novel chemical sensors
  • biosensors and electronic nose
  • electrical transducers
  • gas sensing principle

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

19 pages, 4049 KiB  
Article
Effect of Carrier Gas on the Gas Sensing Performance of Co1−2xNixMnxFe2−yCeyO4 Double-Substitution Spinel in Flammable Gases and Volatile Organic Compounds
by Sunday A. Ogundipe, Ceboliyazakha L. Ndlangamandla, Mmantsae M. Diale, Mudalo Jozela, Hendrik C. Swart, David E. Motaung and Steven S. Nkosi
Coatings 2023, 13(10), 1771; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13101771 - 14 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1157
Abstract
The presence of high concentrations of flammable gases and volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere has been widely reported to be detrimental to human survival. A lot of research effort has been put toward finding an efficient means of quick detection of these [...] Read more.
The presence of high concentrations of flammable gases and volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere has been widely reported to be detrimental to human survival. A lot of research effort has been put toward finding an efficient means of quick detection of these gases below their ‘immediately dangerous to life or health’ concentrations. Detecting these gases in an oxygen-deficient environment is a crucial task to consider and has been overlooked. In this research, double-substitution spinel with the chemical formula Co1−2xNixMnxFe2−yCeyO4, where 0 ≤ x = y ≤ 0.3, was prepared via the glycol-thermal technique. The final products, following appropriate substitution, were CoFe2O4 (dried naturally), CoFe2O4 (dried with infrared lamp), Co0.8Ni0.1Mn0.1Fe1.9Ce0.1O4, Co0.6Ni0.2Mn0.2Fe1.8Ce0.2O4 and Co0.4Ni0.3Mn0.3Fe1.7Ce0.3O4 spinel ferrites. The X-ray diffractometry (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron micrographs (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the samples confirmed the formation of the spinel. The gas sensing performance of these samples was tested at the operating temperature of 225 °C toward liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), ammonia, ethanol and propanol. The Co0.8Ni0.1Mn0.1Fe1.9Ce0.1O4-based sensor was selective to LPG, with a high response of 116.43 toward 6000 ppm of LPG when helium was used as the carrier gas, 3.35 when dry air was the carrier gas, 4.4 when nitrogen was the carrier gas, but it was not sensitive when argon was used as the carrier gas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Coatings for Gas Sensors)
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