Advanced Biomaterials, Coatings and Techniques: Applications in Medicine and Dentistry

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Surface Coatings for Biomedicine and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 July 2024 | Viewed by 12626

Special Issue Editors

Department of Technology of Materials and Devices in Dental Medicine, “Victor Babes” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania
Interests: dental materials/biomaterials; alloys; ceramics; thermoplastic resins; 3D printing/bioprinting; CAD/CAM milling; corrosion evaluation; welding; scanning; coating; oral health; dental caries
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Oral Pathology, “Victor Babes” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania
Interests: oral medicine; oral pathology; dental materials; nanomaterials; biomaterials; oral microbiome; oral biofilm; oral cancer; nanomedicine; oral microenvironment; oral biomarkers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript to the Special Issue “Advanced Biomaterials, Coatings and Techniques: Applications in Medicine and Dentistry”.

The field of biomaterials is a very extensive one, encompassing both the materials themselves and their manufacturing methods, which are constantly developing.

The use of biomaterials for medical and oral applications is associated with specific issues concerning their biocompatibility, bio-integration, antimicrobial properties, corrosion resistance and long-term performance, as a consequence of their close contact with human tissues. In the field of regenerative medicine, biomaterials are of great importance when used as scaffolds to promote cell growth and differentiation, resulting in the healing of tissue lesions.

Coatings play an important role in achieving the most crucial properties of biomaterials through surface modification, making them suitable for medical and oral applications.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide an updated outlook on the applications of biomaterials and coatings in medicine and dentistry, as well as presenting innovative manufacturing technologies. It represents a good opportunity for researchers and scholars worldwide to disseminate different aspects of their work and reporting the results related to this topic. Research articles, reviews, and communications are equally invited for this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Lavinia Cosmina Ardelean
Prof. Dr. Laura-Cristina Rusu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • dental materials
  • orthopedic materials
  • protective coatings
  • bioactive coatings
  • antibacterial coatings
  • regenerative medicine

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

3 pages, 202 KiB  
Editorial
Advanced Biomaterials, Coatings, and Techniques: Applications in Medicine and Dentistry
Coatings 2022, 12(6), 797; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12060797 - 08 Jun 2022
Viewed by 1343
Abstract
The field of biomaterials is very extensive, encompassing both the materials themselves and the manufacturing methods, which are constantly developing [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

10 pages, 1358 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Cyclic Fatigue Resistance of Tia Tornado Blue and Tia Tornado Gold in Curved Canals: In Vitro Study
Coatings 2024, 14(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14010015 - 22 Dec 2023
Viewed by 599
Abstract
(1) Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the cyclic fatigue behavior of the newly introduced endodontic instrument systems Tia Tornado Blue and Tia Tornado Gold. (2) Methods: The tested rotary instruments were divided according to their type into four groups [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the cyclic fatigue behavior of the newly introduced endodontic instrument systems Tia Tornado Blue and Tia Tornado Gold. (2) Methods: The tested rotary instruments were divided according to their type into four groups as follows: Tia Tornado Blue (TTB), Tia Tornado Gold (TTG), Protaper Gold (PTG), and Vortex Blue (VB). The cyclic fatigue resistance of fifteen instruments of each group, totaling 60, was tested. Each instrument was rotated under continuous motion inside an artificial canal at simulated body temperature at the speed recommended by the manufacturer until fracture. The time to fracture was recorded, and the number of cycles to fracture (NCF) was calculated for each instrument. Additionally, the fractured segment length was calculated, and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images were captured of the fractured surfaces. (3) Results: Statistical analysis revealed that the VB significantly had the highest NCF followed by the PTG, TTG, and TTB (p < 0.05). The lengths of the fractured segments were found to be similar among the tested instrument, which ranged from 4.42 to 4.86 mm (p > 0.05). SEM images exhibited the typical features of cyclic fatigue. (4) Conclusions: The newly introduced instruments, TTG and TTB, exhibited a significantly lower resistance to cyclic fatigue compared to the PTG and VB rotary instruments. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 8050 KiB  
Article
Galvanic Deposition of Calcium Phosphate/Bioglass Composite Coating on AISI 316L
Coatings 2023, 13(6), 1006; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13061006 - 29 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1249
Abstract
Calcium phosphate/Bioglass composite coatings on AISI 316L were investigated with regard to their potential role as a beneficial coating for orthopedic implants. These coatings were realized by the galvanic co-deposition of calcium phosphate compounds and Bioglass particles. A different amount of Bioglass 45S5 [...] Read more.
Calcium phosphate/Bioglass composite coatings on AISI 316L were investigated with regard to their potential role as a beneficial coating for orthopedic implants. These coatings were realized by the galvanic co-deposition of calcium phosphate compounds and Bioglass particles. A different amount of Bioglass 45S5 was used to study its effect on the performance of the composite coatings. The morphology and chemical composition of the coatings were investigated before and after their aging in simulated body fluid. The coatings uniformly covered the AISI 316L substrate and consisted of a brushite and hydroxyapatite mixture. Both phases were detected using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, both analyses revealed that brushite is the primary phase. The presence of Bioglass was verified through energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which showed the presence of a silicon peak. During aging in simulated body fluid, the coating was subject to a dynamic equilibrium of dissolution/reprecipitation with total conversion in only the hydroxyapatite phase. Corrosion tests performed in simulated body fluid at different aging times revealed that the coatings made with 1 g/L of Bioglass performed best. These samples have a corrosion potential of −0.068V vs. Ag/AgCl and a corrosion current density of 8.87 × 10−7 A/cm2. These values are better than those measured for bare AISI 316L (−0.187 V vs. Ag/AgCl and 2.52 × 10−6 A/cm2, respectively) and remained superior to pure steel for all 21 days of aging. This behavior indicated the good protection of the coating against corrosion phenomena, which was further confirmed by the very low concentration of Ni ions (0.076 ppm) released in the aging solution after 21 days of immersion. Furthermore, the absence of cytotoxicity, verified through cell viability assays with MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, proves the biocompatibility of the coatings. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

18 pages, 8244 KiB  
Article
EIS and LEIS Study on In Vitro Corrosion Resistance of Anodic Oxide Nanotubes on Ti–13Zr–13Nb Alloy in Saline Solution
Coatings 2023, 13(5), 875; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13050875 - 06 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1025
Abstract
This work concerns the search for new ways to modify the surface of the biomedical Ti–13Zr–13Nb alloy for applications in regenerative medicine and personalized medicine. Obtained for the first time, oxide nanotubes (ONTs) layers of first-generation (1G) on a Ti–13Zr–13Nb alloy were produced [...] Read more.
This work concerns the search for new ways to modify the surface of the biomedical Ti–13Zr–13Nb alloy for applications in regenerative medicine and personalized medicine. Obtained for the first time, oxide nanotubes (ONTs) layers of first-generation (1G) on a Ti–13Zr–13Nb alloy were produced by anodizing in 0.5% HF electrolyte at 20 V for 120 min. The physico-chemical characterization of the obtained bamboo-inspired 1G ONTs was conducted using TEM and ATR-FTIR methods. In vitro corrosion resistance of the 1G ONTs and comparative Ti–13Zr–13Nb substrate in saline solution at 37 °C was conducted by open-circuit potential, Tafel curves, anodic polarization curves, and EIS methods. LEIS and SVET study of local corrosion resistance was also carried out. It was found that surface modification by anodizing of the Ti–13Zr–13Nb alloy under proposed conditions allowed to obtain porous ONTs highly resistant to pitting corrosion. The obtained results give a new insight into the relationship between the morphological parameters of first-generation oxide nanotubes and in vitro corrosion resistance of the Ti–13Zr–13Nb alloy in saline solution at the macro- and microscale. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 1695 KiB  
Article
Silane-Containing Universal Adhesives Influence Resin-Ceramic Microtensile Bond Strength
Coatings 2023, 13(2), 477; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13020477 - 20 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1780
Abstract
Background: Silane-containing universal adhesives (UAs) are marketed as adhesion promotors for glass-ceramics. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the priming capacity of γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (γMPTS)-containing and γ-methacryloxypropyltriethoxysilane (γMPTES)/3-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES)-containing universal adhesives (UAs) for lithium disilicate ceramic (LDC). Materials and Methods: Etched LDC discs were [...] Read more.
Background: Silane-containing universal adhesives (UAs) are marketed as adhesion promotors for glass-ceramics. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the priming capacity of γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (γMPTS)-containing and γ-methacryloxypropyltriethoxysilane (γMPTES)/3-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES)-containing universal adhesives (UAs) for lithium disilicate ceramic (LDC). Materials and Methods: Etched LDC discs were distributed into four groups according to the priming material used: (control), no priming; (MBN), LDC was primed with a universal primer (Monobond N); (SBU), γMPTS-containing UA (Single Bond Universal Adhesive) was used as a primer; and (SBP), γMPTES/APTES-containing UA (Scotchbond Universal Plus Adhesive) was used as a primer. LDC discs were cemented using a dual-cure resin cement, then sectioned into microbeams for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) evaluation. Failure modes were assessed. Results: MBN application showed the highest μTBS among all groups. γMPTES/APTES-containing UA (SBP) resulted in considerably higher μTBS compared with γMPTS-containing UA (SBU) or the control group. The mixed failures were the most predominant among all groups. Conclusions: The effect of silane-containing UAs on resin-ceramic μTBS is material dependent. Although γMPTES/APTES-containing UA improved bonding to LDC, the priming of LDC with either of the UAs tested cannot be considered as an alternative to a separate silanization (priming) step using a universal primer. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 685 KiB  
Article
Do Different Types of Adhesive Agents Effect Enamel Demineralization for Orthodontic Bonding? An In Vitro Study
Coatings 2023, 13(2), 401; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13020401 - 09 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1158
Abstract
(1) Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the demineralization around brackets bonded with different types of adhesive agents in a cariogenic suspension environment. (2) Methods: In the study, 60 extracted upper first premolar teeth were divided into three groups with [...] Read more.
(1) Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the demineralization around brackets bonded with different types of adhesive agents in a cariogenic suspension environment. (2) Methods: In the study, 60 extracted upper first premolar teeth were divided into three groups with 20 teeth in each group. In Group 1, Transbond XT Primer + Transbond XT Light Cure Adhesive (3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA), in Group 2, GC Ortho Connect Light Cure Adhesive (GC Crop, Tokyo, Japan) and in Group 3, Transbond™ Plus Self Etching Primer + Transbond XT Light Cure Adhesive (3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) adhesive agents were used. In Group 1 and 2, buccal enamel surfaces were etched for 30 s, washed for 15 s and dried for 15 s. All groups were bonded with Gemini metal (3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) brackets. Gingival, occlusal and proximal enamel surfaces of the brackets were measured with a DIAGNOdent pen (KaVo, Biberach, Germany), and demineralization values were recorded. Measurements were performed after bracketing (T0) and after 28 days in a cariogenic environment (T1), which was renewed every 48 h. The Kolmogorov–Smirnov test was used to determine whether or not the data were homogeneously distributed, the Wilcoxon test was used for comparisons within groups, and the Mann–Whitney U and Kruskal–Wallis tests were used for comparisons between groups. (3) Results: In all groups, demineralization values on all enamel surfaces of the brackets were found to be statistically significantly higher in the T1 period than in the T0 period (p < 0.05). In the T1 period, demineralization values of occlusal enamel surfaces in Groups 1 and 2 were found to be significantly higher than in Group 3 (p < 0.05). The amount of increase in occlusal enamel surface demineralization value between T0 and T1 periods in Groups 1 and 2 was significantly higher than in Group 3 (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in demineralization values of proximal and gingival enamel surfaces between the groups in the T1 period (p > 0.05). (4) Conclusion: Significantly less occlusal enamel surface demineralization was observed in teeth in which the Transbond™ Plus Self Etching Primer adhesive agent was not applied with acid etching. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 4234 KiB  
Article
Coralline Hydroxyapatite Coated with a Layer Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Containing BMP-2 Induces Dose-Related Ectopic Bone Formation in Wistar Rats
Coatings 2021, 11(10), 1195; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11101195 - 30 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1601
Abstract
In order to evaluate loading methods and the dose dependency of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) in ectopic bone formation, an osteoinductive material consisting of commercially available coralline hydroxyapatite (CHA) was coated with a layer of biomimetic calcium phosphate (BioCaP) containing BMP-2 in [...] Read more.
In order to evaluate loading methods and the dose dependency of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) in ectopic bone formation, an osteoinductive material consisting of commercially available coralline hydroxyapatite (CHA) was coated with a layer of biomimetic calcium phosphate (BioCaP) containing BMP-2 in different ways. Eight groups—each containing samples of 0.25 g CHA—were formed and coated with, respectively, BioCaP with internally incorporated BMP-2 in concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60 µg per sample, and the two control groups with BioCaP only and BioCaP with 20 µg of adsorbed BMP-2 per sample. The samples were implanted subcutaneously in 27 male Wistar rats. The histological results show that there is no bone formation in the group in which no BMP-2 was included. All samples with BioCaP containing BMP-2 show bone formation. The group with 20 µg of adsorbed BMP-2 per sample shows the least bone formation. Coating-incorporated BMP-2 is more efficient in inducing bone formation than adsorbed BMP-2. The group with 5 µg of coating-incorporated BMP-2 per sample shows the most bone formation. Increasing the amount of coating-incorporated BMP-2 up to 60 µg does not improve ectopic bone formation. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

24 pages, 710 KiB  
Review
Degradation and Stabilization of Resin-Dentine Interfaces in Polymeric Dental Adhesives: An Updated Review
Coatings 2022, 12(8), 1094; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12081094 - 01 Aug 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2779
Abstract
Instability of the dentine-resin interface is owed to the partial/incomplete penetration of the resin adhesives in the collagen fibrils. However, interfacial hydrolysis of the resin-matrix hybrid layer complex activates the collagenolytic and esterase enzymes that cause the degradation of the hybrid layer. Adequate [...] Read more.
Instability of the dentine-resin interface is owed to the partial/incomplete penetration of the resin adhesives in the collagen fibrils. However, interfacial hydrolysis of the resin-matrix hybrid layer complex activates the collagenolytic and esterase enzymes that cause the degradation of the hybrid layer. Adequate hybridization is often prevented due to the water trapped between the interfibrillar spaces of the collagen network. Cyclic fatigue rupture and denaturation of the exposed collagen fibrils have been observed on repeated application of masticatory forces. To prevent interfacial microstructure, various approaches have been explored. Techniques that stabilize the resin–dentine bond have utilized endogenous proteases inhibitors, cross linking agents’ incorporation in the exposed collagen fibrils, an adhesive system free of water, and methods to increase the monomer penetration into the adhesives interface. Therefore, it is important to discover and analyze the causes of interfacial degradation and discover methods to stabilize the hybrid layer to execute new technique and materials. To achieve a predictable and durable adhesive resin, restoration is a solution to the many clinical problems arising due to microleakage, loss of integrity of the restoration, secondary caries, and postoperative sensitivity. To enhance the longevity of the resin-dentine bond strength, several experimental strategies have been carried out to improve the resistance to enzymatic degradation by inhibiting intrinsic collagenolytic activity. In addition, biomimetic remineralization research has advanced considerably to contemporary approaches of both intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar remineralization of dental hard tissues. Thus, in the presence of biomimetic analog complete remineralization of collagen, fibers are identified. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Polydopamine surface modification of bioabsorbable Mg-Sc-Sr scaffold prepared by laser micro hole drilling for bone regeneration

Authors: Pedram Sotoudeh Bagha, Cameron Vo, Kayley Romero, Xiaoming Yu, Mehdi Razavi

Abstract: To enhance bone regeneration associated with bone loss and defects, metallic absorbable scaffolds have already been developed with different methods, such as additive manufacturing. However, partial melting of the metal particles and void formation in the structure decreases the structural integrity and reliability of the scaffold. This study used laser micro hole drilling to prepare 70% porous absorbable Mg-Sc-Sr disks with 250 µm pore sizes. First, Mg-0.5Sc-0.1Sr (wt.%) disks were prepared by casting under protective argon gas in a metal mold and heat treated at 400 °C for 6 h. Then, disks of 10 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness were drilled via laser micromachining with a 6-W femtosecond laser beam focused by a convex lens. Finally, scaffolds were coated with a polydopamine film after immersing in a solution of polydopamine in methanol for 24 h to control their biodegradation and improve biocompatibility. The microstructure of the polydopamine-coated disks was examined with optical and secondary electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The corrosion behavior was studied with electrochemical and static immersion tests in Hanks solution after 3 days. Finally, a cell viability test was performed to analyze the cytocompatibility of the scaffolds. The effect of the polydopamine coating on corrosion control and cell viability of the scaffolds was discussed.
Back to TopTop