Bio-Based and Bio-Inspired Polymers and Composites

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactive Coatings and Biointerfaces".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 15485

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460, USA
Interests: bio-based polymer and composites; oleochemistry; carbon nanotubes; microwaves
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia
Interests: bio-based polyurethanes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The current global trends in plastic waste generation, energy demand, petroleum depletion, world population growth, food supply, and the constant need to develop more sustainable and efficient industrial systems promotes uncertainties about our future. Nevertheless, significant progress in the chemistry and engineering of bio-based systems has been made over the past few decades, giving hope for the widespread implementation of more sustainable practices in the near future. This Special Issue on “Bio-Based and Bio-Inspired Polymers and Composites” encompasses the latest advancements made in the research of bio-based polymeric materials, including all aspects of polymers and composites prepared from bio-renewable resources. Works using biological molecules and their derivatives as matrix and/or reinforcement are welcome. Likewise, reports on systems and architecture designs inspired from biological systems will also be considered. While the main focus of this Special Issue is the disclosure of original research, comprehensive literature review works are of interest as well.

Dr. Rafael L. Quirino
Prof. Dr. Thomas Garrison
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bio-based polymers
  • biocomposites
  • bio-inspired materials
  • biological molecules

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

15 pages, 3728 KiB  
Article
The 2′,4′-Dichloro-chalcone Inhibits the In Vitro Growth and Pathogenicity of Fusarium tricinctum and Trichothecium roseum by Activating Cyanide-Resistant Respiration
by Fupeng Zhu, Yan Zhu, Yuanshou Zhao, Fu Chen, Wenjun Sheng, Wei Zhang, Pengqing Wang, Jiangwen Deng, Yunyu Sun, Weibing Zhang and Yongcai Li
Coatings 2023, 13(10), 1789; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13101789 - 18 Oct 2023
Viewed by 812
Abstract
Chalcones are a class of flavonoids possessing antimicrobial properties and have potential for use as coatings of plant products for the control of postharvest diseases. The effects of 2′,4′-dichloro-chalcone on the in vitro growth and in vivo pathogenicity of Fusarium tricinctum and Trichothecium [...] Read more.
Chalcones are a class of flavonoids possessing antimicrobial properties and have potential for use as coatings of plant products for the control of postharvest diseases. The effects of 2′,4′-dichloro-chalcone on the in vitro growth and in vivo pathogenicity of Fusarium tricinctum and Trichothecium roseum were investigated. First, 1 µM of 2′,4′-dichloro-chalcone strongly inhibited the mycelial growth and conidial production of F. tricinctum (32.3%) and T. roseum (65.2%) in vitro. Meanwhile, the cell membrane permeability was increased by 25% and 22.5% and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species was increased by 41.7 and 65.4%, respectively, of F. tricinctum and T. roseum. This treatment also significantly inhibited the total respiration rate and activated the cyanide-resistant respiratory pathway in both pathogens. The expression level of AOX was enhanced in F. tricinctum and T. roseum by 52.76 and 39.13%, respectively. This treatment also significantly inhibited the expansion of potato dry rot from F. tricinctum (48.6%) and apple rot spot from T. roseum (36.2%). Therefore, 2′,4′-dichloro-chalcone has potential use as an alternative safety method in the control of postharvest diseases by F. tricinctum and T. roseum in agricultural practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based and Bio-Inspired Polymers and Composites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 4149 KiB  
Article
Itaconic Anhydride as a Bio-Based Compatibilizer for a Tung Oil-Based Thermosetting Resin Reinforced with Sand and Algae Biomass
by Julio Antonio Conti Silva, Seth Dever, Anthony Siccardi, Drew Snelling, Ibrahim Al Qabani, Scott Thompson, Karin Goldberg, Genevieve Baudoin, Talita Martins Lacerda and Rafael Lopes Quirino
Coatings 2023, 13(7), 1188; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13071188 - 01 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1090
Abstract
In this work, renewable composites were prepared by the association of a thermosetting resin synthesized via free-radical polymerization, using a mixture of tung oil, n-butyl methacrylate, and divinylbenzene, with silica-rich fillers, namely an algae biomass with high silica content, and a well-sorted [...] Read more.
In this work, renewable composites were prepared by the association of a thermosetting resin synthesized via free-radical polymerization, using a mixture of tung oil, n-butyl methacrylate, and divinylbenzene, with silica-rich fillers, namely an algae biomass with high silica content, and a well-sorted sand. Furthermore, to investigate if the interaction between the non-polar resin and polar reinforcements could be improved, enhancing the materials’ mechanical properties, itaconic anhydride, a bio-derived molecule obtained from itaconic acid, was introduced to the resin composition. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) suggested that the thermal stability of the composites was overall not changed with the addition of itaconic anhydride. The mechanical properties of the sand composites, however, did improve, as the storage modulus at room temperature, measured by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), almost doubled in the presence of itaconic anhydride. The glass transition temperatures of the materials increased by approximately 30 °C when sand was used as a reinforcement. Water absorption experiments validated an increase in the polarity of the unreinforced resin by the addition of itaconic anhydride to its formulation. The composites, however, did not exhibit a significant difference in polarity in the presence of itaconic anhydride. Finally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), demonstrated better matrix–filler adhesion in the presence of itaconic anhydride for high-silica algae composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based and Bio-Inspired Polymers and Composites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 5935 KiB  
Article
Tailored Biobased Resins from Acrylated Vegetable Oils for Application in Wood Coatings
by Sabine Briede, Oskars Platnieks, Anda Barkane, Igors Sivacovs, Armands Leitans, Janis Lungevics and Sergejs Gaidukovs
Coatings 2023, 13(3), 657; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13030657 - 20 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1748
Abstract
The modern coating market is dominated by acrylic, polyurethane, and polyester polymer resins produced from unsustainable fossil resources. Herein, we propose the preparation of resins from biobased components to produce functional and solvent-free wood coatings with enhanced performance properties. Acrylated rapeseed, linseed, and [...] Read more.
The modern coating market is dominated by acrylic, polyurethane, and polyester polymer resins produced from unsustainable fossil resources. Herein, we propose the preparation of resins from biobased components to produce functional and solvent-free wood coatings with enhanced performance properties. Acrylated rapeseed, linseed, and grapeseed oils were prepared via a one-step synthesis and used as a basis for the control of resin viscosity and fatty acid content. A combination of vegetable oil acrylates was used as a matrix and the biobased monomer propoxylated glycerol triacrylate (GPT) was selected to tailor the properties of the UV crosslinked network. During polymerization, the GPT monomer induced a two-phase microstructure as indicated by an SEM analysis. The possibility of generating a tailored microstructure in the final material was examined in this study. The addition of GPT increased the storage modulus by up to five-fold, crosslink density by up to two-fold at 20 °C, and glass transition temperature by up to 10.2 °C. Pull-off adhesion tests showed a strength of 1.21 MPa. In addition, the photo-oxidation effect on samples, i.e., aging, was assessed with microhardness, sliding friction, and optical microscopy. Coatings showed a microhardness value up to 250 MPa, while a coefficient of friction (μ) was in the range of 0.21 to 0.88. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based and Bio-Inspired Polymers and Composites)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

15 pages, 4086 KiB  
Article
Itaconic Anhydride as a Green Compatibilizer in Composites Prepared by the Reinforcement of a Tung Oil-Based Thermosetting Resin with Miscanthus, Pine Wood, or Algae Biomass
by Julio Antonio Conti Silva, Hannah Walton, Seth Dever, Kamran Kardel, Talita Martins Lacerda and Rafael Lopes Quirino
Coatings 2023, 13(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13010025 - 23 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1548
Abstract
Unsaturated vegetable oils with conjugated carbon–carbon double bonds, such as tung oil, can undergo free-radical polymerization, originating alternatives to petroleum-based materials. The introduction of fillers to vegetable oil-based polymer matrices results in composites with improved mechanical properties. In this work, thermosets were synthesized [...] Read more.
Unsaturated vegetable oils with conjugated carbon–carbon double bonds, such as tung oil, can undergo free-radical polymerization, originating alternatives to petroleum-based materials. The introduction of fillers to vegetable oil-based polymer matrices results in composites with improved mechanical properties. In this work, thermosets were synthesized by the free-radical polymerization of a mixture of tung oil, divinylbenzene, and n-butyl methacrylate, and reinforced with bio-based fillers, namely Miscanthus, Pinus taeda (also known as southern pine), and algae (Microspora and Oedogonium) biomass. The effect of filler particle size on the composites’ properties was evaluated. Additionally, to develop a better interaction between the hydrophobic resin and the hydrophilic reinforcements, and improve the mechanical properties of the composites prepared, itaconic anhydride, a bio-based molecule derived from itaconic acid, was added to the resin. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the presence of itaconic anhydride improved the overall thermal stability of the composites. The storage modulus of the composites at room temperature, assessed by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), was increased by approximately 32% and 68%, for Miscanthus and southern pine composites, respectively, when itaconic acid was added to the resin. It was also observed that the glass transition temperatures were not significantly affected by the presence of itaconic acid. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images indicated better matrix-reinforcement adhesion in the presence of itaconic anhydride. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based and Bio-Inspired Polymers and Composites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 3282 KiB  
Article
Synthesis and Properties of Bio-Based Composites from Vegetable Oils and Starch
by Eletria Biswas, Julio Antonio Conti Silva, Mujibur Khan and Rafael Lopes Quirino
Coatings 2022, 12(8), 1119; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12081119 - 04 Aug 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1904
Abstract
Natural polymers, such as starch, and polymers derived from renewable resources, such as vegetable oils, have been considered as alternatives to petroleum-based plastics during recent decades, due to environmental concerns. Indeed, these materials can offer a variety of advantages, such as low cost, [...] Read more.
Natural polymers, such as starch, and polymers derived from renewable resources, such as vegetable oils, have been considered as alternatives to petroleum-based plastics during recent decades, due to environmental concerns. Indeed, these materials can offer a variety of advantages, such as low cost, wide availability, carbon neutrality, elevated thermal stability, and easily tunable mechanical properties. However, some of these polymers alone exhibit poor mechanical properties, making them not suitable for some applications. Hence, the reinforcement of these bio-based polymers with other materials is often considered to overcome this challenge. In this work, thermosetting composites based on tung and linseed oil resins were prepared using starch as reinforcement. Analyses from Soxhlet extractions showed that the higher the concentration of tung oil in comparison to linseed oil in the resins, the lower the mass of unreacted material, leading to an optimum resin entirely based on tung oil. Dielectric analysis (DEA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the polymerization was completed in 3 h 20 min, at 140 °C, and that the composites were thermally stable until 270 °C. Finally, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) confirmed that the addition of starch to the resins increased the room temperature storage modulus (E25) from 94 MPa to 893 MPa. Composites prepared with a resin formulation that did not contain a compatibilizer exhibited E25 of 441 MPa. The composites investigated in this work are promising candidates for applications that require improved mechanical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based and Bio-Inspired Polymers and Composites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 7864 KiB  
Article
Biodegradation Study of Polyurethanes from Linseed and Passion Fruit Oils
by Roseany V. V. Lopes, Nuno P. D. Loureiro, Rafael L. Quirino, Ana Cristina M. Gomes, Ana Paula T. Pezzin, Luciana P. Manzur, Maria Lucília dos Santos and Maria J. A. Sales
Coatings 2022, 12(5), 617; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12050617 - 01 May 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1934
Abstract
Bio-based polyurethanes (PU) have been developed as biodegradable and biocompatible, promising materials. In this work, PU foams with interesting properties and biodegradable characteristics were prepared from the polyols of linseed oil (LO) and passion fruit oil (PFO). The PUs reported herein were synthesized [...] Read more.
Bio-based polyurethanes (PU) have been developed as biodegradable and biocompatible, promising materials. In this work, PU foams with interesting properties and biodegradable characteristics were prepared from the polyols of linseed oil (LO) and passion fruit oil (PFO). The PUs reported herein were synthesized in 0.8 and 1.2 [NCO]/[OH] molar ratios, and were submitted to a soil degradation test, followed by analyses via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), stereomicroscope, thermogravimetry (TG/DTG), and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results obtained indicate significant biodegradation activity. SEM micrographs of the PUs after soil the degradation test showed that the materials were susceptible to microbiological deterioration. TG/DTG curves showed that the PU samples were less thermally stable after the period of landfill than those freshly prepared. FTIR spectroscopy was used to identify chemical changes that occurred during biodegradation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based and Bio-Inspired Polymers and Composites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 3060 KiB  
Article
Design of Bioinspired Emulsified Composite European Eel Gelatin and Protein Isolate-Based Food Packaging Film: Thermal, Microstructural, Mechanical, and Biological Features
by Wafa Taktak, Hela Kchaou, Marwa Hamdi, Suming Li, Moncef Nasri, Maha Karra-Chaâbouni and Rim Nasri
Coatings 2020, 10(1), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10010026 - 30 Dec 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2953
Abstract
The study focused on the elaboration and the characterization of blend biofilms based on European eel skin gelatin (ESG) and protein isolate (EPI) and the assessment of European oil (EO) incorporation effect on their properties. Data displayed that the incorporation of EPI and [...] Read more.
The study focused on the elaboration and the characterization of blend biofilms based on European eel skin gelatin (ESG) and protein isolate (EPI) and the assessment of European oil (EO) incorporation effect on their properties. Data displayed that the incorporation of EPI and EO to the gelatin formulation decreased the lightness and yellowness of composite and emulsified films, respectively, compared to ESG film. Moreover, ESG films exhibited improved mechanical properties than EPI films. FTIR analysis, all incorporated films with EO at the ratio 1:4 (oil/polymer) revealed similar characteristic bands as in free-oil films. Further, the SEM images of 100% ESG and 100% EPI films showed a smooth and homogenous structure, whereas the cross-section of blend film (at a ratio 50:50) displayed a rougher microstructure. In addition, emulsified film ESG100 revealed a smooth and homogeneous microstructure compared to that prepared using EPI/ESG 50/50 ratio. Furthermore, EPI or EO addition into the ESG matrix enhanced the blend films antioxidant activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based and Bio-Inspired Polymers and Composites)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

35 pages, 5643 KiB  
Review
Streptomyces-Derived Bioactive Pigments: Ecofriendly Source of Bioactive Compounds
by Aixa A. Sarmiento-Tovar, Laura Silva, Jeysson Sánchez-Suárez and Luis Diaz
Coatings 2022, 12(12), 1858; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12121858 - 30 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2277
Abstract
Pigments have been used since historical times and are currently used in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and other industries. One of the main sources of natural pigments are plants and insects; however, microorganisms are of great interest due to their bioactivities and advantages in [...] Read more.
Pigments have been used since historical times and are currently used in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and other industries. One of the main sources of natural pigments are plants and insects; however, microorganisms are of great interest due to their bioactivities and advantages in their production. Actinobacteria, especially the genus Streptomyces, are biotechnologically valuable, producing specialized metabolites with a broad spectrum of bioactivities, such as antioxidant, anticancer, antibiofilm, antifouling, and antibiotic activities, as well as pigments, among others. In this review, we identify, summarize, and evaluate the evidence regarding the potential of Streptomyces strains to be biological sources of bioactive pigments. To conclude, future research will include purifying pigmented extracts that have already been reported, studying the purified compounds in a specific application, isolating new microorganisms from new isolation sources, improving the production of pigments already identified, modifying culture media or using new technologies, and developing new extraction techniques and a wide range of solvents that are ecofriendly and efficient. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based and Bio-Inspired Polymers and Composites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop