The World’s Dynamic and Complex Edges of the Sea—a Special Issue Celebrating the Launch of COASTS

A special issue of Coasts (ISSN 2673-964X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 2394

Special Issue Editors


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The Animal Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast, 90 Sippy Downs Dr, Sippy Downs, QLD 4556, Australia
Interests: sandy beaches; coastal ecology; conservation & management; human-wildlife interactions; food webs
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Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology, Stevinweg 1, 2628 CN Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: coastal engineering; nearshore hydrodynamic and morphodynamic processes; coastal erosion; nourishments; coastal observations
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Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
Interests: conservation biology; wildlife ecology; habitat restoration
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many of us can recall the valiant struggle during the final act of long operas and theatre plays, fighting gravity pulling on eyelids that grew heavier with any couplet, high note, or ever-so-(over)familiar Shakespearean quote. Much more pleasant memories are the musically raucous and spirited overtures, imbued with elan and artfully veiled clues of tunes yet to be played (e.g., The Marriage of Figaro). Therefore, it is no surprise that overtures have become much-loved pieces, often played divorced from their heavier, full-blooded opera cousin. At Coasts, we have built the stage, calligraphed invitations for the opening gala night, ordered the champagne and caviar, painted the backdrop (i.e., journal scope), and handed out the sharpened goose quills: now the time has come to tip those quills into the inks of imagination and academic erudition and write the Overture for Coasts. Our journal will be a free spirit and a broad church, encouraging debate, radical new ideas, and deploying Trojan horses when discourses have become entrenched and stale. We are also frivolously ambitious and aim not at one overture, but a rich potpourri of many overtures. This potpourri shall reflect the luxurious diversity that coastal systems reveal to us every day: the edge of the sea duels Mozart in endless variations of librettos that feature beloved, and sometimes unexpected, characters from geology, mathematics, modelling, geography, biology, hydrology, restoration, ecology, conservation, sociology, economy and many other family members—all of which are invited to the birthday of Coasts. Let creativity be your muse and collectively make our potpourri of overtures in this Special Issue a captivating libretto for Coasts.

The curtain rises on Figaro and bride-to-be Susanna, fitting out the new room…

Prof. Dr. Thomas Schlacher
Dr. Matthieu de Schipper
Dr. Brooke Maslo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coasts is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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25 pages, 2570 KiB  
Article
Comparing Public Participation in Coastal and Marine Planning in the Arctic: Lessons from Iceland and Norway
by Maria Wilke
Coasts 2023, 3(4), 345-369; https://doi.org/10.3390/coasts3040021 - 03 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Amid a changing global climate, Northern coastal communities face a variety of challenges to their livelihoods, which are dependent on marine resources. Marine spatial planning (MSP) provides opportunities for cooperation between authorities, stakeholders, and the public to ensure sustainable marine management. Public participation [...] Read more.
Amid a changing global climate, Northern coastal communities face a variety of challenges to their livelihoods, which are dependent on marine resources. Marine spatial planning (MSP) provides opportunities for cooperation between authorities, stakeholders, and the public to ensure sustainable marine management. Public participation is a crucial element of coastal and marine planning for its long-term democratic legitimacy and sustainability. However, the process of MSP is often wrought with conflict and challenges of involving stakeholders and the public in decisions concerning an often-contested marine space. Whereas coastal zone planning (CZP) is well established in Norway and a reiteration of previous CZP was conducted 2020–23, MSP is new to Iceland, and has only recently been launched with its first pilot plans in 2019. This study investigates how participation in coastal and marine planning processes compare between Iceland and Norway and what lessons can be shared between them. Data were collected from two case studies in the Tromsø region in Norway and the Westfjords of Iceland through analysis of planning documentation, literature review, as well as participant observation in the Westfjords and 11 semi-structured interviews across both case studies. The results show that public participation is formally integral to both processes but, in practice, varies considerably. Both planning processes are driven by the expansion of the aquaculture industry, and a variety of issues faced during the planning process are similar. In Norway, public participation is politically desired and guided by a participation strategy emphasising synergies between expert and local knowledge. In the Tromsø region, meaningful public participation varied across municipalities and issues regarding Indigenous participation remain. In Iceland, there is little evident political expectation of public engagement, and the process is characterised by a passive approach to participation that aims to inform the public but does not include wider sharing of decision-making power. The findings do not only make clear that a revision of current public participation processes is needed in both case studies but also point towards wider issues in marine governance that have consequences for blue justice, such as the exclusion of groups in decision-making, lack of public discussion of marine issues and top–down governance supporting established power hierarchies. Full article
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Review
Optimistic Scenario of 0.50 m Mean Sea Level Rise and Possible Environmental Impacts, Resulting from Tidal Variations, in the City of Niterói, Rio de Janeiro—Brazil
by Vilmar Leandro Dias Ferreira, Elizabeth Santos Pereira, Lucas Pluvie Souza de Mello, Rodrigo Amado Garcia Silva and Fábio Ferreira Dias
Coasts 2023, 3(3), 209-226; https://doi.org/10.3390/coasts3030013 - 01 Aug 2023
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Abstract
As several researches indicate, since the 1950s one observed unprecedented warming of the atmosphere and oceans, resulting from greenhouse gas emissions and changes in land use and occupation, leading to sea level rise and impacts on coastal areas. In the municipality of Niterói—Rio [...] Read more.
As several researches indicate, since the 1950s one observed unprecedented warming of the atmosphere and oceans, resulting from greenhouse gas emissions and changes in land use and occupation, leading to sea level rise and impacts on coastal areas. In the municipality of Niterói—Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where a large urban concentration in coastal areas is observed, a Climate Change Adaptation System was developed, through which mitigation and adaptation strategies are combined, in order to: reduce vulnerabilities; avoid losses and damages; build instruments to allow adaptation of natural, human, productive and infrastructure systems. In this context, this paper aims to measure possible impacts, in the biophysical and socioeconomic spheres, resulting from an eventual 0.50 m rise in mean sea level, which represents an optimistic scenario according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In contrast to similar studies, this work also considered daily and occasional water level variations, represented by the highest astronomical tide and the highest storm surge observed in the studied region. The following data were applied: digital elevation model, 2010 population census data, and real estate information. With the altimetry data, by means of GIS, the census sectors inserted in the affected areas were selected, to obtain data regarding population, number of households, and income. Specialized websites were applied to collect average property values. The simulations revealed that approximately 2950 households and more than 9000 residents could be directly affected, with losses that could exceed R$ 3.60 billion. The Oceanic Region is configured as the most exposed region, susceptible to losses of several ecosystems, economic losses in residential areas and possible destruction of urban infrastructure. Full article
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