Teaching Pathology Towards Clinics and Practice

A special issue of Clinics and Practice (ISSN 2039-7283).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 7065

Special Issue Editors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pathology is a key specialty in clinical practice. Aside from the classic histopathological diagnosis, pathologists establish many prognostic indexes in malignant tumors, inflammatory diseases, and chronic degenerative diseases. With the arrival of precision medicine, pathologists are essential in selecting the correct patients for personalized therapies and in evaluating the degree of response to treatment. The pathological report is not a mere result obtained from a device; it is a complex interpretation obtained after pairing clinical and radiological information with morphological, immunohistochemical, and genomic data.

An objective of this Special Issue is for it to serve as a forum where the knowledge of the intricacies of pathology can be improved through cooperation between many other specialists for a better interdisciplinary understanding. A second goal would be to help pathologists with some experiences in a given field by providing practical advices, tips, and diagnostic cues.

The Guest Editors encourage pathologists around the world to submit and disseminate their personal experiences in research on any topic of medicine in the format of original or review papers.

Dr. José I. López
Dr. Claudia Manini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Clinics and Practice is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pathology
  • clinical–pathological correlation
  • cancer
  • inflammatory diseases
  • degenerative diseases
  • diagnosis
  • differential diagnosis

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 4807 KiB  
Article
Clinico-Pathological Features and Immunohistochemical Comparison of p16, p53, and Ki-67 Expression in Muscle-Invasive and Non-Muscle-Invasive Conventional Urothelial Bladder Carcinoma
by Abdulkarim Hasan, Yasien Mohammed, Mostafa Basiony, Mehenaz Hanbazazh, Abdulhadi Samman, Mohamed Fayek Abdelaleem, Mohamed Nasr, Hesham Abozeid, Hassan Ismail Mohamed, Mahmoud Faisal, Eslam Mohamed, Diaa Ashmawy, Mohamed Tharwat, Deaa Fekri Morsi, Abeer Said Farag, Eman Mohamed Ahmed, Noha M. Aly, Hala E. Abdel-Hamied, Doaa E. A. Salama and Essam Mandour
Clin. Pract. 2023, 13(4), 806-819; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract13040073 - 09 Jul 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2295
Abstract
Introduction: The identification of bladder detrusor muscle invasion in urothelial cancer is essential for prognosis and management. We studied the clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical expression of p16, p53, and Ki-67 in urothelial detrusor muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) and urothelial non-detrusor muscle-invasive bladder cancer [...] Read more.
Introduction: The identification of bladder detrusor muscle invasion in urothelial cancer is essential for prognosis and management. We studied the clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical expression of p16, p53, and Ki-67 in urothelial detrusor muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) and urothelial non-detrusor muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) in Egyptian patients. Methods: Sixty-two bladder urothelial cancer cases obtained through TURBT were included and divided into two groups: (MIBC, stage T2) and NMIBC (T1). Tissue blocks were recut and re-examined microscopically; then, the immunostaining of p16, p53, and Ki-67 was performed to compare both groups and evaluate the 13% cut-off for Ki-67, 20% for p53, and p16 intensity in various conditions aided by telepathology technology. Results and conclusion: Hematuria was the main clinical first presentation, with no significant difference between either group. The mean age was 61.6 years, with male predominance (52 males and 10 females). The absence of papillary histological pattern was associated with a higher stage, including detrusor muscle invasion (p = 0.000). The overall average percent of p53 immunostaining was 12.9%, revealing no significant difference between MIBC and NMIBC when a cut-off of 20% was implicated. The Ki-67 expression was correlated with higher grade and muscle invasion; however, no association was found with the other two markers’ expression. The negative immunostaining of p16 was associated with low grade and NMIBC in the case of the preservation of the papillary pattern. We recommend further studies on the cut-off of widely used markers and more immunohistochemical and genetic studies on the p16(INK4A), taking into consideration the histological pattern of conventional carcinomas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teaching Pathology Towards Clinics and Practice)
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17 pages, 1488 KiB  
Systematic Review
Factors Contributing to Surgical Site Infections: A Comprehensive Systematic Review of Etiology and Risk Factors
by Alexandra Bucataru, Maria Balasoiu, Alice Elena Ghenea, Ovidiu Mircea Zlatian, Dan Dumitru Vulcanescu, Florin George Horhat, Iulia Cristina Bagiu, Virgiliu Bogdan Sorop, Madalina Ioana Sorop, Andrada Oprisoni, Estera Boeriu and Stelian Stefanita Mogoanta
Clin. Pract. 2024, 14(1), 52-68; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract14010006 - 28 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1221
Abstract
Surgical site infections persist as a substantial concern within the realm of hospital-acquired infections. This enduring issue is further compounded by the mounting challenge of antibiotic resistance, a surge in surgical interventions, and the presence of comorbidities among patients. Thus, a comprehensive exploration [...] Read more.
Surgical site infections persist as a substantial concern within the realm of hospital-acquired infections. This enduring issue is further compounded by the mounting challenge of antibiotic resistance, a surge in surgical interventions, and the presence of comorbidities among patients. Thus, a comprehensive exploration of all discernible risk factors, as well as proactive preventive and prophylactic strategies, becomes imperative. Moreover, the prevalence of multidrug-resistant microorganisms has reached alarming proportions. Consequently, there is an acute need to investigate and scrutinize all potential therapeutic interventions to counter this burgeoning threat. Consequently, the primary objective of this review is to meticulously assess the origins and risk elements intertwined with surgical site infections across a diverse spectrum of surgical procedures. As the medical landscape continues to evolve, this critical analysis seeks to provide a nuanced understanding of the multi-faceted factors contributing to surgical site infections, with the overarching aim of facilitating more effective management and mitigation strategies. By exploring these dimensions comprehensively, we endeavor to enhance patient safety and the quality of surgical care in this era of evolving healthcare challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teaching Pathology Towards Clinics and Practice)
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8 pages, 1060 KiB  
Brief Report
Digital Patient Education on Xanthelasma Palpebrarum: A Content Analysis
by Kevin J. Varghese, Som P. Singh, Fahad M. Qureshi, Shreevarsha Shreekumar, Aarya Ramprasad and Fawad Qureshi
Clin. Pract. 2023, 13(5), 1207-1214; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract13050108 - 29 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Patient education has been transformed using digital media and online repositories which disseminate information with greater efficiency. In dermatology, this transformation has allowed for patients to gain education on common cutaneous conditions and improve health literacy. Xanthelasma palpebrarum is one of the most [...] Read more.
Patient education has been transformed using digital media and online repositories which disseminate information with greater efficiency. In dermatology, this transformation has allowed for patients to gain education on common cutaneous conditions and improve health literacy. Xanthelasma palpebrarum is one of the most common cutaneous conditions, yet there is a poor understanding of how digital materials affect health literacy on this condition. Our study aimed to address this paucity of literature utilizing Brief DISCERN, Rothwell’s Classification of Questions, and six readability calculations. The findings of this study indicate a poor-quality profile (Brief DISCERN < 16) regarding digital materials and readability scores which do not meet grade-level recommendations in the United States. This indicates a need to improve the current body of educational materials used by clinicians for diagnosing and managing xanthelasma palpebrarum. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teaching Pathology Towards Clinics and Practice)
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7 pages, 6424 KiB  
Case Report
Benign Mesothelial Proliferations of the Tunica Vaginalis Testis
by Claudia Manini, Estíbaliz López-Fernández, Nicola Cruciano, Alessandro Comandone and José I. López
Clin. Pract. 2023, 13(5), 1130-1136; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract13050101 - 15 Sep 2023
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Abstract
The correct diagnosis of mesothelial proliferations is a classic problem for pathologists, and one which has important clinical implications. A significant number of such cases appear associated with recurrent hydrocele, as an irritative/reactive response to this condition. The morphological spectrum of mesothelial lesions [...] Read more.
The correct diagnosis of mesothelial proliferations is a classic problem for pathologists, and one which has important clinical implications. A significant number of such cases appear associated with recurrent hydrocele, as an irritative/reactive response to this condition. The morphological spectrum of mesothelial lesions in this topography is broad, and a set of benign conditions may appear, sometimes with florid gross features and cytologic pseudo-atypia. Here, we present two different examples in which malignancy was initially considered in the differential diagnosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teaching Pathology Towards Clinics and Practice)
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9 pages, 247 KiB  
Opinion
The Practice of Teaching and Scientific Research on Cadaveric Material Remains Crucial for Medical Education
by Giorgio Bolino, Vittorio Fineschi, Camilla Cecannecchia, Gianpiero D’Antonio and Paola Frati
Clin. Pract. 2023, 13(5), 1073-1081; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract13050095 - 01 Sep 2023
Viewed by 997
Abstract
The practice of teaching and scientific research on cadaveric material remains crucial for medical education, especially in surgical disciplines. However, in Italy, this practice has been neglected due to legislative insufficiency and financial constraints. Although innovative methods and tools like simulators and e-learning [...] Read more.
The practice of teaching and scientific research on cadaveric material remains crucial for medical education, especially in surgical disciplines. However, in Italy, this practice has been neglected due to legislative insufficiency and financial constraints. Although innovative methods and tools like simulators and e-learning have been adopted, direct hands-on experience with human cadavers remains irreplaceable for medical and surgical education. The absence of clear legislation governing cadaveric dissection has limited availability for teaching and research, resulting in economic burdens for universities and individuals seeking proper surgical training. To address this issue, Law No. 10/2020 and the recent implementing decree were introduced in Italy, providing detailed legislation on the donation of bodies for educational and research purposes. The law emphasizes the importance of respecting the donor’s specific choices and aligns with constitutional principles promoting culture, research, and health protection. However, some critical issues related to consent procedures, duration of body availability, and preservation of anatomical parts remain. Additionally, the law’s dissemination among the population needs improvement. Future optimization could include allowing donors to choose the timing of body donation and considering different timeframes for body availability. Furthermore, the implementation of consent procedures could be simplified to increase donations. The law should also address the need for appropriate reception centers and allocate resources for effective dissemination. Despite these challenges, Law No. 10/2020 represents a significant step forward in enhancing medical-surgical training, scientific research, and the overall quality of patient care in Italy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teaching Pathology Towards Clinics and Practice)
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