New Trends, Materials, and Technologies and Consolidating Best Practices in Dentistry

A special issue of Clinics and Practice (ISSN 2039-7283).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 8469

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor

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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry, Schola Medica Salernitana, University of Salerno, Via S. Allende, Baronissi, 84081 Salerno, Italy
Interests: periodontology; general dentistry; dental materials; prosthodontics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue summarizes the latest developments in various aspects of dental clinical and surgical practice, highlighting new trends and consolidating best practices. The articles address a wide range of technical topics related to restorative dentistry, endodontics, prosthodontics, periodontics, oral surgery, implantology and orthognatodontics; the challenges of diagnosing, treatment planning, medication prescribing and managing special care patients and oral‒systemic interconnections; the exploration of newly introduced dental materials and biomaterials, including their properties, benefits, limitations and clinical applications; and new technologies in dental practice, including digital imaging, computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD /CAM) and 3D printing.

Reviews and original articles investigating a wide range of topics, including newly introduced dental materials and biomaterials, technology in dental practice, oral‒systemic interconnections, management of patients with special needs, and oral and dental care, are welcomed.

Dr. Federica Di Spirito
Dr. Francesco D’Ambrosio
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Clinics and Practice is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dentistry
  • dental care
  • dental practice
  • restorative dentistry
  • endodontics
  • prosthodontics
  • periodontics
  • oral surgery
  • implantology
  • orthognatodontics
  • medication prescription
  • special needs patients
  • dental materials
  • biomaterials
  • dental technologies

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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4 pages, 210 KiB  
Editorial
Clinics and Practice: Consolidating Best Practices in Periodontal Management
by Francesco D’Ambrosio
Clin. Pract. 2023, 13(3), 666-669; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract13030061 - 02 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1089
Abstract
Periodontitis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease [...] Full article

Research

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14 pages, 8357 KiB  
Article
Case Report of a Dental Implant with Conometric Abutment–Prosthetic Cap Connection: Advanced High-Resolution Imaging and Peri-Implant Connective Tissue Performance
by Nicole Riberti, Emira D’Amico, Tania Vanessa Pierfelice, Michele Furlani, Alessandra Giuliani, Adriano Piattelli, Giovanna Iezzi and Luca Comuzzi
Clin. Pract. 2024, 14(2), 556-569; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract14020043 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 732
Abstract
Background: In recent years, the use of conometric systems to connect dental implant abutments and prosthetic caps has been advocated because they seem to eliminate the side effects reported when using screw- and cement-connected prosthetic restorations. Objectives: The present case study [...] Read more.
Background: In recent years, the use of conometric systems to connect dental implant abutments and prosthetic caps has been advocated because they seem to eliminate the side effects reported when using screw- and cement-connected prosthetic restorations. Objectives: The present case study is focused on conometric connection characterization and its performance in terms of the microarchitecture of peri-implant soft tissues by using a cross-linked approach based on optical microscopy and three-dimensional imaging. Methods: Two dental implants were characterized using micro-CT and another identical one was implanted into a patient; the latter was retrieved 45 days later due to changes in prosthetic needs. Afterward, the peri-implant soft tissues were investigated using synchrotron-based phase contrast imaging, histology, and polarized light microscopy. Results: Micro-CT analysis showed perfect adhesion between the abutment and prosthetic cap; histology and polarized light microscopy showed that connective tissue was richly present around the abutment retrieved from the patient. Moreover, the quantitative evaluation of connective tissues using synchrotron imaging, supported by artificial intelligence, revealed that this tissue was rich in mature collagen, with longitudinal and transverse collagen bundles intertwined. The number and connectivity of transverse bundles were consistently greater than those of the longitudinal bundles. Conclusion: It was found that the peri-implant soft tissue was already mature and well organized after only 45 days of implantation, supporting the hypothesis that conometric connections contribute to the significant stabilization of peri-implant soft tissues. Full article
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16 pages, 987 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Abfraction Lesions Restored with Three Dental Materials: A Comparative Study
by Bogdan Constantin Costăchel, Anamaria Bechir, Alexandru Burcea, Laurența Lelia Mihai, Tudor Ionescu, Olivia Andreea Marcu and Edwin Sever Bechir
Clin. Pract. 2023, 13(5), 1043-1058; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract13050093 - 26 Aug 2023
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Abstract
Background: Abfraction lesions are manifested as damage to hard tissues in the cervical area of dental crowns. The study aimed to assess the direct restoration of abfraction lesions according to the modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria for 24 months. The [...] Read more.
Background: Abfraction lesions are manifested as damage to hard tissues in the cervical area of dental crowns. The study aimed to assess the direct restoration of abfraction lesions according to the modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria for 24 months. The restorations were accomplished with Fuji Bulk–GC, Omnichroma Flow-Tokuyama, and Beautifil® II–Shofu dental materials, and the therapy was or was not associated with wearing thermoformed mouthguards. Methods: From the 53 selected and analyzed patients (n = 53), 28 patients (with restorations of abfraction lesions) belonged to the 1st group and 25 patients (with 105 restorations, who also wore mouthguards) belonged to the 2nd group. Blind determination assessments were effectuated at baseline and after 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Results showed that, regardless of the rating score, there are no significant statistical differences in the evaluation criteria between the two groups of patients Conclusions: For each material, the scores of USPHS criterion presented good clinical performances after 24 months, with no significant statistical differences between the fillings and the applied therapy in the two groups of patients. Full article
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16 pages, 2237 KiB  
Article
Pulpectomy vs. Pulpotomy as Alternative Emergency Treatments for Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis—A Multicenter Comparative Randomised Clinical Trial on Patient Perceptions
by Guillem Esteve-Pardo, Pedro Barreiro-Gabeiras and Lino Esteve-Colomina
Clin. Pract. 2023, 13(4), 898-913; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract13040082 - 02 Aug 2023
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Abstract
Aim: There needs to be more general agreement on the most effective treatment for the emergency patient with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis (SIP). This equivalence randomised clinical study compared the clinical efficiency, as an urgent treatment, of pulpotomy (POT) and pulpectomy (PEC) in the [...] Read more.
Aim: There needs to be more general agreement on the most effective treatment for the emergency patient with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis (SIP). This equivalence randomised clinical study compared the clinical efficiency, as an urgent treatment, of pulpotomy (POT) and pulpectomy (PEC) in the permanent teeth with SIP. The primary outcome was pain management, and the secondary outcome was the patient’s perception of duration, comfort, and satisfaction. Material & Methods: 80 patients were blindly and randomly allocated into two equal parallel groups, the control group treated by PEC and the test group by POT. Data were collected through numerical rating scales (NRS) during the intervention and 6, 24, and 72 h post-op. Non-parametric tests were used to analyse the data. The Brunner-Longer models were adopted for longitudinal data and the analysis of variance (ANOVA)-type statistical was used. Results: The mean preoperative pain levels for the whole sample scored 5.8 ± 2.8 and significantly decreased to 2.1 ± 2.4 at 6 h, 1.5 ± 2.1 at 24 h, and 1.3 ± 2 at 72 h, without any differences between the groups. No significant differences were found in the patient’s perception of treatment discomfort or duration between the groups. Three days after the intervention, patient satisfaction was high, with 9.2 ± 1.7 and 9.1 ± 2 in the PEC and POT groups, respectively. Self-reported pain was the only variable penalising the patient’s final satisfaction. Conclusions: The current randomised control trial (RCT) showed that both pulpectomy and pulpotomy effectively eliminate pain and achieve high levels of patient satisfaction. Furthermore, the patient’s perceptions of the duration and discomfort of the two treatments were similar. Given that pulpotomy is a faster and more straightforward technique, it may be recommended as a viable and pragmatic option for treating emergency patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Full article
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10 pages, 1282 KiB  
Article
Relationships between Lip Seal Strength, Tongue Pressure, and Daytime Sleepiness in Japanese Workers: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Akira Minoura, Yoshiaki Ihara, Hirotaka Kato, Kouzou Murakami, Yoshio Watanabe, Kojiro Hirano, Yoshinori Ito and Akatsuki Kokaze
Clin. Pract. 2023, 13(4), 753-762; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract13040068 - 04 Jul 2023
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Abstract
This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the relationships between lip seal strength, tongue pressure, and daytime sleepiness in Japanese workers. A self-administered questionnaire which comprised the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was completed by 496 workers, and excessive daytime sleepiness was defined by an [...] Read more.
This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the relationships between lip seal strength, tongue pressure, and daytime sleepiness in Japanese workers. A self-administered questionnaire which comprised the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was completed by 496 workers, and excessive daytime sleepiness was defined by an ESS score of 11 or over. Lip seal strength and tongue pressure were measured in all participants, and multiple regression analyses were performed to examine the effects of lip seal strength and tongue pressure on daytime sleepiness. The median ESS score was 5.0 (25th and 75th percentiles: 2.0 and 8.0), and 42 (8.5%) workers had excessive daytime sleepiness. The median lip seal strength was 13.5 N (11.4, 16.3), and the tongue pressure was 41.7 kPa (35.2, 48.3). Workers with higher ESS scores had significantly lower levels of lip seal strength than those without, following adjustments for age and body mass index (BMI) values (β (95% confidence interval): −0.043 [−0.081, −0.004]). However, tongue pressure was not significantly associated with ESS score after adjustments for age and/or BMI. These results suggest that maintaining moderate lip seal strength may help prevent excessive daytime sleepiness in Japanese workers regardless of age or BMI. Full article
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Other

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11 pages, 25706 KiB  
Opinion
Importance of Early Detection of Wire Syndrome: A Case Series Illustrating the Main Stages of the Clinical Gradient
by Carole Charavet, Nathan Israël, France Vives and Sophie-Myriam Dridi
Clin. Pract. 2023, 13(5), 1100-1110; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract13050098 - 11 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1340
Abstract
(1) Context and Objective: Wire syndrome (WS) refers to dental displacements which can be qualified as aberrant, unexpected, unexplained, or excessive of teeth still contained by an intact orthodontic retainer wire without detachment or fracture, leading to evolving aesthetic and/or functional consequences, both [...] Read more.
(1) Context and Objective: Wire syndrome (WS) refers to dental displacements which can be qualified as aberrant, unexpected, unexplained, or excessive of teeth still contained by an intact orthodontic retainer wire without detachment or fracture, leading to evolving aesthetic and/or functional consequences, both dental and periodontal. The clinical diagnosis of WS in severe cases is often easy. On the other hand, emerging cases must be detected early to stop this evolutionary process as soon as possible, as well as to effectively manage unwanted dental displacements and associated dento-periodontal tissue repercussions. The aim of this retrospective study was to understand the challenges and importance of early diagnosis, highlight the clinical gradient of WS, and clarify the key elements of diagnosis for many practitioners confronted with this type of problem. (2) Materials and Methods: Three cases of increasing complexity were described: the history of wire syndrome, a description of the key elements of its diagnosis, and the final diagnosis itself. (3) Results: Different types and locations of wire syndrome have been observed, from early form to terminal wire syndrome. The three main stages of the clinical gradient are described as follows. In the first case, wire syndrome starting on tooth 41, called the “X-effect” type, was suspected. X-effect wire syndrome on 21, X-effect wire syndrome on 41, and Twist-effect wire syndrome on 33 were diagnosed in the second case, which can be classified as an intermediate case. In the extreme clinical situation of the last case, severe and terminal wire syndrome on tooth 41, the X-effect type, was observed. (4) Conclusions: This case series presents the main stages of the clinical gradient of WS. Although in the case of early WS it is very difficult to identify and/or differentiate it from movements related to a classical relapse phenomenon, the diagnosis of terminal WS is very easy. The challenge for the practitioner is therefore to detect WS as early as possible to stop the iatrogenic process and propose a personalized treatment depending on the severity of clinical signs. The earlier WS is detected, the less invasive the treatment. Full article
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