Review Feature Papers for Climate

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2023) | Viewed by 17436

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Guest Editor
USDA, Southeast Climate Hub, 3041 E Cornwallis Rd., Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA
Interests: forest nitrogen cycling; landscape-scale hydrology and carbon sequestration; climate change impacts on forests; forest disturbance impact adaptation; non-antecedent forest stress; high elevation forest biogeochemical cycling; acidic deposition impacts

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Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
Interests: human and natural impacts on weather, air quality and climate; land-cover/use impacts on cloud and precipitation formation; pollution in remote locations, wind energy; evaluation of air-quality model results
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As Editorial Board Members of Climate, we are glad to announce the Special Issue titled "Review Feature Papers for Climate". This Special Issue is designed to publish high-quality review papers in Climate. We welcome submissions from Editorial Board Members and from outstanding scholars invited by the Editorial Board and the Editorial Office. The scope of this Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, the following topics:

  • climate research at various spatial and temporal scales
  • interdisciplinary climate research
  • climate mitigation
  • adaptation

You are welcome to send short proposals for submissions of review feature papers to our Editorial Office (climate@mdpi.com). They will first be evaluated by academic editors, and then, selected papers will be thoroughly and rigorously peer reviewed.

Dr. Steven McNulty
Prof. Dr. Nicole Mölders
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate dynamics
  • climate modelling
  • climate policy
  • climate economics
  • climate adaptation
  • climate mitigation
  • weather
  • urban ecosystems

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Review

21 pages, 1097 KiB  
Review
Nanofertilizer Use for Adaptation and Mitigation of the Agriculture/Climate Change Dichotomy Effects
by Raquel Saraiva, Quirina Ferreira, Gonçalo C. Rodrigues and Margarida Oliveira
Climate 2023, 11(6), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli11060129 - 10 Jun 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3056
Abstract
Agriculture is considered a significant climate change (CC) driver due to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the loss of fertilizers that contribute to water eutrophication. On the other hand, climate change effects are already impacting agriculture, endangering food security. This paper explores the [...] Read more.
Agriculture is considered a significant climate change (CC) driver due to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the loss of fertilizers that contribute to water eutrophication. On the other hand, climate change effects are already impacting agriculture, endangering food security. This paper explores the dichotomies of the effects of agriculture on CC as well as of CC on agriculture, focusing on the contribution that nanofertilizers can bring to this complex system in both directions. The strategies to reduce CC while adapting and mitigating its effects must be a global effort. It is not possible to focus only on the reduction in GHG emissions to stop the effects that are already being felt worldwide. Nanofertilizers, especially slow- and controlled-release nanofertilizers, can reduce the nutrient input and also boost productivity while mitigating some CC effects, such as soil nutrient imbalance and agricultural emissions. As so, this review highlights the benefits of nanofertilizers and their role as a part of the strategy to reduce the reach of CC and mitigate its ever-growing effects, and presents some guidelines for the increased use of these materials in order to enhance their efficacy in this strategy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Feature Papers for Climate)
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22 pages, 1425 KiB  
Review
Review of Vulnerability Factors Linking Climate Change and Conflict
by Takato Nagano and Takashi Sekiyama
Climate 2023, 11(5), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli11050104 - 9 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4554
Abstract
This systematic literature review gathers societal vulnerability factors linking climate change and conflict from 53 existing studies. The findings reveal three main points. First, four relevant factors are missing from a previous vulnerability analysis framework proposed by Pearson and Newman: land degradation/land cover, [...] Read more.
This systematic literature review gathers societal vulnerability factors linking climate change and conflict from 53 existing studies. The findings reveal three main points. First, four relevant factors are missing from a previous vulnerability analysis framework proposed by Pearson and Newman: land degradation/land cover, gender, customs, and geographical conditions. Second, two factors, access to technology (e.g., for climate change adaptation) and partially democratic states, are insufficiently studied. Third, classification criteria in the previous framework need revision for accuracy. Considering these points, this study proposes a modified vulnerability analysis framework and offers five suggestions for future research directions in climate security research. First, more qualitative case studies are needed to complement the quantitative work. Second, in particular, cases where conflict was avoided or cooperation was established in high vulnerability areas need further research. Third, further research is needed on understudied factors (e.g., access to technology and partial democracy) and on factors the conventional framework cannot explain (e.g., land degradation/land cover, gender, customs, and geographical conditions). Fourth, no single vulnerability factor leads to conflict in isolation, but only in interaction; their connections must be studied. Finally, case studies are needed on vulnerability factors in countries and regions that have suffered from climate change but have not experienced conflict. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Feature Papers for Climate)
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14 pages, 703 KiB  
Review
Observations from Personal Weather Stations—EUMETNET Interests and Experience
by Claudia Hahn, Irene Garcia-Marti, Jacqueline Sugier, Fiona Emsley, Anne-Lise Beaulant, Louise Oram, Eva Strandberg, Elisa Lindgren, Martyn Sunter and Franziska Ziska
Climate 2022, 10(12), 192; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli10120192 - 2 Dec 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3438
Abstract
The number of people owning a private weather station (PWS) and sharing their meteorological measurements online is growing worldwide. This leads to an unprecedented high density of weather observations, which could help monitor and understand small-scale weather phenomena. However, good data quality cannot [...] Read more.
The number of people owning a private weather station (PWS) and sharing their meteorological measurements online is growing worldwide. This leads to an unprecedented high density of weather observations, which could help monitor and understand small-scale weather phenomena. However, good data quality cannot be assured and thorough quality control is crucial before the data can be utilized. Nevertheless, this type of data can potentially be used to supplement conventional weather station networks operated by National Meteorological & Hydrological Services (NMHS), since the demand for high-resolution meteorological applications is growing. This is why EUMETNET, a community of European NMHS, decided to enhance knowledge exchange about PWS between NMHSs. Within these efforts, we have collected information about the current interest in PWS across NMHSs and their experiences so far. In addition, this paper provides an overview about the data quality challenges of PWS data, the developed quality control (QC) approaches and openly available QC tools. Some NMHS experimented with PWS data, others have already incorporated PWS measurements into their operational workflows. The growing number of studies with promising results and the ongoing development of quality control procedures and software packages increases the interest in PWS data and their usage for specific applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Feature Papers for Climate)
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16 pages, 1074 KiB  
Review
Influence of Climate on Conflicts and Migrations in Southern Africa in the 19th and Early 20th Centuries
by Mphethe I. Tongwane, Teke S. Ramotubei and Mokhele E. Moeletsi
Climate 2022, 10(8), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli10080119 - 16 Aug 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3075
Abstract
Climate and other environmental factors continue to play important contributions on the livelihoods of communities all over the world. Their influence during historical periods and the roles they played remain under-reported. The main objective of this review is to investigate the climatological conditions [...] Read more.
Climate and other environmental factors continue to play important contributions on the livelihoods of communities all over the world. Their influence during historical periods and the roles they played remain under-reported. The main objective of this review is to investigate the climatological conditions during the time of the invasion of early European settlers in Southern Africa in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It establishes the possible relationships between climate variability and historical conflicts and wars, famines, disease pandemics, and the migration of African people to towns in search of sustainable and predictable livelihoods away from unreliable agriculture. A qualitative analysis of published peer reviewed literature in the form of reports, papers, and books was used in this review. At least 60 literature items were reviewed in this paper. There is a relationship between climate variability and the historical events of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Tribal conflicts and most of the wars between the settlers and the African people for land coincided with periods of droughts. Drought were key causes of famines, instabilities, and land degradation in the region. This study highlights the influence of environmental conditions on socio-economic conditions as the world enters an era of climate change and urbanization in developing countries, particularly in Africa. It shows that the hardships caused by environmental conditions have the potential to destabilize societies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Feature Papers for Climate)
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21 pages, 5969 KiB  
Review
The Imprint of Recent Meteorological Events on Boulder Deposits along the Mediterranean Rocky Coasts
by Marco Delle Rose and Paolo Martano
Climate 2022, 10(7), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli10070094 - 26 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2386
Abstract
In this review, the potential of an emerging field of interdisciplinary climate research, Coastal Boulder Deposits (CBDs) as natural archives for intense storms, is explored with particular reference to the Mediterranean region. First, the identification of the pertinent scientific articles was performed by [...] Read more.
In this review, the potential of an emerging field of interdisciplinary climate research, Coastal Boulder Deposits (CBDs) as natural archives for intense storms, is explored with particular reference to the Mediterranean region. First, the identification of the pertinent scientific articles was performed by the using Web of Science (WoS) engine. Thus, the selected studies have been analysed to feature CBDs produced and/or activated during the last half-century. Then, the meteorological events responsible for the literature-reported cases were analysed in some detail using the web archives of the Globo-Bolam-Moloch model cascade. The study of synoptical and local characteristics of the storms involved in the documented cases of boulder production/activation proved useful for assessing the suitability of selected sites as geomorphological storm proxies. It is argued that a close and fruitful collaboration involving several scientific disciplines is required to develop this climate research field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Feature Papers for Climate)
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