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Anthocyanins: Bioactivity and Chemistry

A special issue of Current Issues in Molecular Biology (ISSN 1467-3045). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioorganic Chemistry and Medicinal Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 5538

Special Issue Editor

LAQV–REQUIMTE, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal
Interests: agri-food wastes; lignin; color stabilization; anthocyanins; food science
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Anthocyanins are a class of phenolic compounds responsible for a great diversity of colours (from red to blue) found in nature, especially flowers and fruits, and some processed products, such as juices and red wines. Over the years, numerous biologic studies have demonstrated their potential health benefits to humans, especially in terms of the antioxidant properties of anthocyanins. In aqueous solutions, these pigments exist as different species: flavylium cation, neutral and anionic quinoidal base, hemiketal form, cis- and trans-chalcone forms in equilibrium. Besides pH, anthocyanins’ stability is also affected by light, temperature and exposure to oxygen which has been limiting their use in food and cosmetic matrices as colorants and nutraceutics. Several strategies have been reported in the literature regarding the stabilization of these pigments towards their application in different matrices. This includes interaction with different compounds including polymers and the chemical/enzymatic transformation into more stable pigments. 

We invite researchers to contribute either with original research or review articles focusing on, but not limited to: (i) chemical transformation of anthocyanins towards the production of more stabilized structures with appealing chromatic features; (ii) stabilization of anthocyanin using original approaches; (iii) mechanism of action in improving human nutrition; (iv) bioactivity (bioavailability, metabolites, enzymes inhibition, anti-proliferative and anti-bacterial activities).

Dr. Joana Oliveira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Issues in Molecular Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Anthocyanins
  • chemical and enzymatic transformation
  • physical-chemical features
  • anthocyanin in human nutrition
  • enzymes interactions
  • anthocyanins bioavailability
  • anti-proliferative activity
  • anti-bacterial activity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 1491 KiB  
Article
An Exploratory In Vivo Study on the Effect of Annurca Apple Extract on Hair Growth in Mice
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2022, 44(12), 6280-6289; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb44120428 - 09 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3414
Abstract
Hair loss is an important problem affecting the quality of life in modern society. Recent studies show that Annurca apple extract (AAE), enriched in procyanidin B2 and nutraceuticals, promotes hair growth and induces keratin production. In this study, we investigated the effects of [...] Read more.
Hair loss is an important problem affecting the quality of life in modern society. Recent studies show that Annurca apple extract (AAE), enriched in procyanidin B2 and nutraceuticals, promotes hair growth and induces keratin production. In this study, we investigated the effects of AAE by orally administering AAE in six-week-old C57BL/6 mice once a day for 21 d. We observed improvement in hair length, thickness, weight, and density. The gene expression of two growth factors related to hair growth, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF-7), were measured using the quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The gene expression of both VEGFA and FGF-7 increased significantly in the AAE-treated group. Additionally, treatment with AAE suppressed the gene expression of type 1 5α-reductase. Histological analysis showed that protein levels of cytokeratin 5 and 10 were increased in the skin tissues of the AAE-treated group. These results suggest that AAE might be a potential therapeutic natural product that prevents hair loss by promoting the expression of hair growth-related factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthocyanins: Bioactivity and Chemistry)
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14 pages, 2941 KiB  
Article
Identification of Seven Key Structural Genes in the Anthocyanin Biosynthesis Pathway in Sepals of Hydrangea macrophylla
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2022, 44(9), 4167-4180; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb44090286 - 12 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1690
Abstract
Under specific cultivation conditions, the sepal color of Hydrangea macrophylla (H. macrophylla) changes from red to blue due to the complexation of aluminum ions (Al3+), delphinidin 3-glucoside, and copigments. However, this phenomenon cannot occur in all cultivars despite the [...] Read more.
Under specific cultivation conditions, the sepal color of Hydrangea macrophylla (H. macrophylla) changes from red to blue due to the complexation of aluminum ions (Al3+), delphinidin 3-glucoside, and copigments. However, this phenomenon cannot occur in all cultivars despite the presence of sufficient Al3+ and copigments. To explore the mechanism of sepal bluing in H. macrophylla, there is an urgent need to study the molecular regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. However, the key structural genes, other than CHS, regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in the sepals of H. macrophylla have not been identified. In this study, based on full-length transcriptome data from H.macrophylla ‘Bailmer’, the key structural genes regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in the sepals of H. macrophylla were isolated and investigated. Ultimately, seven key structural genes, HmCHS1, HmCHI, HmF3H1, HmF3H1, HmF35H, HmDFR2, and HmANS3, were demonstrated to show high expression levels in colored sepals. The expression levels of these seven genes increased gradually with the development of sepals and were highest in the full-bloom stage. The trend of gene expression was consistent with the trend of anthocyanin contents. It was concluded that the seven selected genes were involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis in the sepals of H. macrophylla. The full-length sequence data have been deposited into the NCBI Sequence Read Archive (SRA) with accession number PRJNA849710. This study lays a good foundation for the further elucidation of the molecular mechanism of sepal coloration in H. macrophylla. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthocyanins: Bioactivity and Chemistry)
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