Pediatric Nursing in a Post-pandemic World

A topical collection in Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This collection belongs to the section "Pediatric Nursing".

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Editor


E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
School of Nursing, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
Interests: maternal; neonatal and child health; nursing; family-centered care; health equity

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused suffering and death for millions of people around the world and stretched healthcare systems to the breaking point. Pediatric nurses have been at the forefront of the pandemic, contributing through direct patient care, public health, health system leadership, education, and research to ensure that children and their families maintain their physical and mental health and reach their developmental potential despite the challenges of fear, isolation, economic hardship, and inequities of the pandemic. Pediatric nurses faced enormous challenges in delivering their mission because of shortages in personal protective equipment, staffing shortages, and risk of SARS-CoV-2 exposure for themselves and their loved ones.

In this Topical Collection, we aim to highlight the outstanding work of pediatric nurse clinicians, health system leaders, educators, and researchers who have provided new innovations and evidence to advance pediatric healthcare during the pandemic and to accelerate recovery in a post-pandemic world. We invite high-quality manuscripts on any aspect of clinical care, family-centered care, service delivery, public health, school nursing, health education, or research related to children’s health and illness from a nursing perspective, a focus on health equity, and in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic or pandemic recovery.

Prof. Dr. Linda Franck
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • pandemic
  • child
  • primary health care
  • public health
  • health equity
  • critical care
  • pediatric nursing
  • neonatal nursing
  • maternal–child nursing
  • family nursing
  • school nursing
  • caregivers
  • child health
  • patient care management
  • patient-centered care
  • health education
  • comprehensive health care
  • continuity of patient care

Published Papers (2 papers)

2023

Jump to: 2022

17 pages, 1606 KiB  
Article
Mental Health and Health-Related Quality of Life of Children and Youth during the First Year of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Results from a Cross-Sectional Survey in Saskatchewan, Canada
by Nazeem Muhajarine, Vaidehi Pisolkar, Tamara Hinz, Daniel A. Adeyinka, Jessica McCutcheon, Mariam Alaverdashvili, Senthil Damodharan, Isabelle Dena, Christa Jurgens, Victoria Taras, Kathryn Green, Natalie Kallio and Yolanda Palmer-Clarke
Children 2023, 10(6), 1009; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10061009 - 03 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1625
Abstract
For children and youth, the COVID-19 pandemic surfaced at a critical time in their development. Children have experienced extended disruptions to routines including in-person schooling, physical activities, and social interactions—things that bring meaning and structure to their daily lives. We estimated the prevalence [...] Read more.
For children and youth, the COVID-19 pandemic surfaced at a critical time in their development. Children have experienced extended disruptions to routines including in-person schooling, physical activities, and social interactions—things that bring meaning and structure to their daily lives. We estimated the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms of children and youth and their experiences of health-related quality of life (HRQoL), during the first year of the pandemic, and identified factors related to these outcomes. Further, we examined these effects among ethnocultural minority families. We conducted an online survey (March–July 2021) with 510 children and youth aged 8–18 years and their parents/caregivers. The sample was representative of the targeted population. We modelled the relationship between anxiety, depression (measured using the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale), HRQoL (measured using KIDSCREEN-10), and sociodemographic, behavioural, and COVID-19-contributing factors using binary logistic regression. A priori-selected moderating effects of sociodemographic characteristics and self-identified ethnocultural minority groups on the outcomes were tested. The point-in-time prevalence of medium-to-high anxiety symptoms and depression symptoms was 10.19% and 9.26%, respectively. Almost half (49.15%) reported low-to-moderate HRQoL. Children reporting medium-to-high anxiety symptoms, depression symptoms, and low-to-moderate HRQoL were more likely to be aged 8–11 years, 16–18 years, ethnocultural minority participants, living in rural/urban areas, having good/fair MH before COVID-19, experiencing household conflicts, having less physical activity, and having ≥3 h of recreational screen time. Those who had more people living at home and ≥8 h of sleep reported low anxiety and depression symptoms. Ethnocultural minority 16–18-year-olds were more likely to report low-to-moderate HRQoL, compared to 12–15-year-olds. Additionally, 8–11-year-olds, 16–18-year-olds with immigrant parents, and 16–18-year-olds with Canadian-born parents were more likely to report low–moderate HRQoL, compared to 12–15-year-olds. Children and youth MH and HRQoL were impacted during the pandemic. Adverse MH outcomes were evident among ethnocultural minority families. Our results reveal the need to prioritize children’s MH and to build equity-driven, targeted interventions. Full article
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2022

Jump to: 2023

16 pages, 723 KiB  
Article
The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Youth with Chronic Pain and Their Parents: A Longitudinal Examination of Who Are Most at Risk
by Kathryn A. Birnie, Daniel C. Kopala-Sibley, Maria Pavlova, Cara G. Nania, Emily Bernier, Jennifer N. Stinson and Melanie Noel
Children 2022, 9(5), 745; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9050745 - 19 May 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2554
Abstract
Objectives: Chronic pain and mental illness in youth and parents are poised to reach new heights amidst the societal and healthcare impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Evidence from natural disasters (i.e., hurricanes) suggests that a degree of personal impact and individual personality may [...] Read more.
Objectives: Chronic pain and mental illness in youth and parents are poised to reach new heights amidst the societal and healthcare impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Evidence from natural disasters (i.e., hurricanes) suggests that a degree of personal impact and individual personality may moderate the effects of high stress events, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, on mental health. Methods: In a pre-existing cohort of 84 youth with chronic pain (Mage = 14.39; 12–18 years; 67.8% female) and 90 parents (86.7% female), we examined changes in youth pain interference and youth and parent mental health (depression, anxiety) from before to during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the influence of personal impact of the pandemic (i.e., financial, familial, health, social, occupational, and educational domains) and individual personality (neuroticism, conscientiousness, extroversion). Results: Overall, youth reported significantly lower pain interference and anxiety as compared to pre-pandemic; however, those more personally impacted by the pandemic reported worsening pain interference and anxiety symptoms. Overall, parents reported greater depressive symptoms as compared to pre-pandemic; however, those more personally impacted by the pandemic reported increased anxiety symptoms. Personality traits (high neuroticism, and low conscientiousness and extroversion) predicted worsened pain and mental health, and exacerbated effects of COVID-19-related personal impact on youth and parent anxiety symptoms. Discussion: Identifying risk and resilience profiles in youth and parents at high risk for worsening pain and mental health may better inform matching interventions to individual need. Full article
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Figure 1

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