Clinical Gait Analysis in Children: Progress and Relevance

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Child Neurology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 November 2024 | Viewed by 2528

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Schön Klinik Vogtareuth, Gait and Motion Analysis Laboratory, Vogtareuth, Germany
Interests: (neuro)orthopedics; neurology; rehabilitation; sports and podiatry with an emphasis on children

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Children's Hospital of Eastern Switzerland, St Gallen, Switzerland
Interests: gait analysis; biomechanics; posture; motion analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Often taken for granted, skills such as walking, running or other locomotor modes are deemed vital aspects of mobility in children. Quantitative motion analysis facilitates the identification of atypical characteristics, helps observing and evaluating them and assists in identifying the source of impairments. This special issue focuses on the application of clinical human movement science with an emphasis on biomechanics of locomotion. Special attention will be put on the value of motion capturing in the context of medical and clinical treatments with various tools, devices and technologies. Main focus will be put on 3 key topics:

  • Better detect pathologies and understand their genesis.
  • Optimize diagnostics and clinical decisions making.
  • Enhance interventions, such as exercises, therapy, orthoses, walking aids, drugs or invasive treatments to alleviate impairments and lower the burden for children.

The spectrum of cohorts may be multifaceted. Methodological work that demonstrates and optimizes the applicability, accuracy and validity of motion capture technology in the medical context is welcome, too.

While the scope of this special issue is to be diverse, it is mandatory that each publication comments in detail on the added value and benefit of the findings from the perspective of practitioners, caregivers, families and foremost of the pediatric patients' point of view.

Dr. Matthias Hösl
Dr. Nathalie Alexander
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gait
  • gait analysis
  • biomechanics
  • motion analysis
  • movement analysis
  • motion capture
  • 3D motion analysis
  • kinematics
  • electromyography
  • rehabilitation
  • orthotics
  • musculoskeletal abnormalities
  • rehabilitation
  • movement disorders
  • neuropediatrics
  • neurology
  • pediatric orthopedics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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18 pages, 4213 KiB  
Article
A Comparison of the Immediate Effects of Verbal and Virtual Reality Feedback on Gait in Children with Cerebral Palsy
by Tine De Mulder, Heleen Adams, Tijl Dewit, Guy Molenaers, Anja Van Campenhout and Kaat Desloovere
Children 2024, 11(5), 524; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11050524 - 27 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Different types of feedback are used during gait training in children with cerebral palsy (CP), including verbal (VB) and virtual reality (VR) feedback. Previous studies on VR feedback showed positive effects on the targeted gait parameter. However, both positive and negative side effects [...] Read more.
Different types of feedback are used during gait training in children with cerebral palsy (CP), including verbal (VB) and virtual reality (VR) feedback. Previous studies on VR feedback showed positive effects on the targeted gait parameter. However, both positive and negative side effects on other parameters were seen as well. The literature on the effect of VB feedback is lacking and, to our knowledge, both feedback methods have not yet been compared. In this monocentric study with a single-session intervention protocol, children with CP completed a training session on the Gait Real-Time Analysis Interactive Lab (GRAIL) and received both VB and VR feedback on hip extension, in randomized order. Outcome parameters were continuous gait curves of sagittal kinematics and hip kinetics, specific features of hip angle and moment, sagittal gait variable scores and gait profile scores. Improvement of the targeted gait parameter was seen both after VB and VR feedback, with a small advantage for VR over VB feedback. Furthermore, positive side effects on knee and ankle sagittal kinematics were seen. However, the overall gait profile score did not improve, most likely due to negative compensatory strategies. In conclusion, children with CP can adapt gait in response to both VB and VR feedback, with VR feedback producing a slightly better effect. Due to secondary effects on parameters other than the targeted parameter, the overall gait did not improve. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Gait Analysis in Children: Progress and Relevance)
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18 pages, 1143 KiB  
Systematic Review
Dynamic Gait Analysis in Paediatric Flatfeet: Unveiling Biomechanical Insights for Diagnosis and Treatment
by Harald Böhm, Julie Stebbins, Alpesh Kothari and Chakravarthy Ughandar Dussa
Children 2024, 11(5), 604; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11050604 - 17 May 2024
Abstract
Background: Flatfeet in children are common, causing concern for parents due to potential symptoms. Technological advances, like 3D foot kinematic analysis, have revolutionized assessment. This review examined 3D assessments in paediatric idiopathic flexible flat feet (FFF). Methods: Searches focused on paediatric idiopathic FFF [...] Read more.
Background: Flatfeet in children are common, causing concern for parents due to potential symptoms. Technological advances, like 3D foot kinematic analysis, have revolutionized assessment. This review examined 3D assessments in paediatric idiopathic flexible flat feet (FFF). Methods: Searches focused on paediatric idiopathic FFF in PubMed, Web of Science, and SCOPUS. Inclusion criteria required 3D kinematic and/or kinetic analysis during posture or locomotion, excluding non-idiopathic cases, adult feet, and studies solely on pedobarography or radiographs. Results: Twenty-four studies met the criteria. Kinematic and kinetic differences between FFF and typical feet during gait were outlined, with frontal plane deviations like hindfoot eversion and forefoot supination, alongside decreased second peak vertical GRF. Dynamic foot classification surpassed static assessments, revealing varied movement patterns within FFF. Associations between gait characteristics and clinical measures like pain symptoms and quality of life were explored. Interventions varied, with orthoses reducing ankle eversion and knee and hip abductor moments during gait, while arthroereisis normalized calcaneal alignment and hindfoot eversion. Conclusions: This review synthesises research on 3D kinematics and kinetics in paediatric idiopathic FFF, offering insights for intervention strategies and further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Gait Analysis in Children: Progress and Relevance)
21 pages, 2479 KiB  
Systematic Review
Bone Deformities through the Prism of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in Ambulant Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review
by Rodolphe Bailly, Christelle Pons, Anne-Charlotte Haes, Lisa Nguyen, Matthias Thepaut, Laëtitia Houx, Mathieu Lempereur and Sylvain Brochard
Children 2024, 11(2), 257; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11020257 - 16 Feb 2024
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Abstract
(1) Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between lower limb bone deformities and body functions, activity, and participation in ambulant children with CP and whether changing bone morphology affects outcomes in these domains. (2) Methods: A systematic literature [...] Read more.
(1) Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between lower limb bone deformities and body functions, activity, and participation in ambulant children with CP and whether changing bone morphology affects outcomes in these domains. (2) Methods: A systematic literature search (PROSPERO CRD42020208416) of studies reporting correlations between measures of lower limb bone deformities and measures of body function, activity or participation, or post-surgical outcomes in these domains was conducted from 1990 to 2023 in Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane Library. We assessed study quality with the Checklist for Case Series (CCS) and a quality assessment developed by Quebec University Hospital. Meta-analysis was not possible; therefore, descriptive synthesis was performed. (3) Results: A total of 12 of 3373 screened articles were included. No studies evaluated the relationships between bone deformities and activity or participation, or the effect of isolated bone surgery on these domains. Correlations between bone deformities and body functions were poor-to-moderate. Internal hip rotation during gait improved after femoral derotation osteotomy. (4) Conclusions: A shift in paradigm is urgently required for the research and management of bone deformities in children with CP to include the activity and participation domains of the ICF, as well as consider more psychological aspects such as self-image. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Gait Analysis in Children: Progress and Relevance)
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