Minimally Invasive Surgery in Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Surgery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2022) | Viewed by 2347

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences, and Public Health, Section of Audiology, University of Brescia, 25123 Brescia, Italy
2. Pediatric Otolaryngology Head Neck Surgery Unit, Children Hospital—ASST Spedali Civili of Brescia, 25123 Brescia, Italy
Interests: otology; head neck surgery; hearing disorder; pediatric otolaryngology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Minimally invasive surgery is a special way of performing interventions through either a limited surgical approach with smaller incisions or approaching from natural openings in the body using smaller instruments than those used in traditional surgical methods. The goal of minimally invasive surgery is to reduce the damage to healthy tissues with equal or superior clinical outcomes and less impact on patients’ bodies and organs. Minimally invasive surgery has rapidly developed in recent decades both for adults’ and children’s diseases. Endoscopic-assisted procedures, robotic-assisted procedures, and imaging-assisted procedures were developed for adult patients for thoracoabdominal surgery and specialistic surgery, such as gynecology and urology. Head and neck surgery rapidly took advantage of these approaches in adults, and more recently children’s head and neck surgical procedures are also gaining considerable success. Minimally invasive surgery for head and neck diseases in children includes endoscopic surgery for inflammatory and neoplastic diseases of the nose, paranasal sinuses, and the skull base, with or without navigation systems, endoscopic treatment for lacrimal sac diseases, endoscopic middle ear surgery, endoscopic treatment of salivary gland diseases, and endoscopic neck surgery. A robotic transoral approach to the oropharynx, particularly the base of the tongue, would minimize the sequelae of pharyngotomic approaches.

The aim of this Special Issue is to review the application of minimally invasive surgery in otorhinolaryngologic diseases in children to inform pediatricians of the opportunity of performing a surgery that minimizes surgical sequelae, improving quality of life.

I am looking forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Luca Redaelli de Zinis
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • head and neck surgery
  • minimally invasive surgery
  • robotic surgery
  • imaging-assisted surgery
  • pediatric surgery
  • endoscopic neck surgery
  • endoscopic ear surgery
  • scialoedoscopy
  • endoscopic sinus surgery
  • minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy
  • minimally invasive video-assisted parathyroidectomy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1052 KiB  
Article
The Role of Endoscopic Assistance in Surgery for Pediatric Cholesteatoma in Reducing Residual and Recurrent Disease
by Nader Nassif and Luca Oscar Redaelli de Zinis
Children 2024, 11(3), 369; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11030369 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 606
Abstract
The primary aim of this study was to evaluate long-term recurrent and residual disease after surgery for acquired cholesteatoma in children according to surgical approach. A total of 71 interventions performed on 67 pediatric patients were included in the study. Canal wall-up tympanomastoidectomy [...] Read more.
The primary aim of this study was to evaluate long-term recurrent and residual disease after surgery for acquired cholesteatoma in children according to surgical approach. A total of 71 interventions performed on 67 pediatric patients were included in the study. Canal wall-up tympanomastoidectomy (CWUT) was performed in 31 ears (13 with endoscopic assistance), a transcanal esclusive endoscopic approach (TEEA) was used in 22, and canal wall-down tympanomastoidectomy (CWDT) was performed in 18. Overall, the cholesteatoma relapse rate estimated by the Kaplan–Meier method was 47 ± 6% at 12 years; the recurrent cholesteatoma rate was 28 ± 6% and the residual cholesteatoma rate was 26 ± 5%. The relapse rate according to surgical approach was 33 ± 11% for CWDT, 60 ± 9% for CWUT, and 40 ± 11% for TEEA (p = 0.04). The difference for recurrent disease was no recurrent disease for CWDT, 42 ± 9% for CWUT, and 32 ± 11% for TEEA (p = 0.01). The residual disease rate was significantly reduced with endoscopy: 42 ± 8% without endoscopy vs. 9 ± 5% with (p = 0.003). CWDT can still be considered in primary surgery in case of extensive cholesteatomas and small mastoid with poor pneumatization. TEEA can be recommended for small cholesteatoma not extending to the mastoid to reduce morbidity. Endoscopic assistance seems useful to reduce residual disease in CWUT, whereas it does not have a significant impact on preventing recurrent disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minimally Invasive Surgery in Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology)
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9 pages, 843 KiB  
Article
Sialendoscopy in Management of Juvenile Recurrent Parotitis—A Single Centre Experience
by Luka Pušnik, Anže Jerman, Jure Urbančič and Aleksandar Aničin
Children 2022, 9(11), 1632; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9111632 - 27 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1317
Abstract
Juvenile recurrent parotitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the parotid gland that shares diverse therapeutic management between institutions. Sialendoscopy has been demonstrated as an efficient diagnostics and therapeutic method with minimal complications; however, due to the rarity of the disease and limited [...] Read more.
Juvenile recurrent parotitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the parotid gland that shares diverse therapeutic management between institutions. Sialendoscopy has been demonstrated as an efficient diagnostics and therapeutic method with minimal complications; however, due to the rarity of the disease and limited data, there is a lack of universal guidelines on its optimal management. Herein, we retrospectively analysed patients with juvenile recurrent parotitis who had the sialendoscopy performed at our tertiary centre. Descriptive data were retrieved along with the number of swelling episodes one year before and after the sialendoscopy intervention. In the last decade, twenty-nine sialendoscopic procedures were performed at our clinics on twenty-one patients diagnosed with juvenile recurrent parotitis. Most of them underwent the procedure under general anaesthesia (86%). In the year before and after the sialendoscopic procedure, the patients had 3.9 ± 2.7 and 0.2 ± 0.4 episodes of swelling per year, respectively. The difference proved to be statistically significant (p < 0.0001). The complete resolution was noted in sixteen patients (76%); however, the procedure was not repeated on the same side of any patient. Solely one patient had a relapse of the disease reported more than twelve months after the sialendoscopy, nonetheless, one of his exacerbation episodes was already reported in the first year after the sialendoscopy. The mean follow-up period of patients was 48.6 months (range, 13–116 months). All things considered, this study emphasises sialendoscopy as an effective minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of juvenile recurrent parotitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minimally Invasive Surgery in Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology)
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