Current Treatment of Pediatric Bowel Diseases

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 9253

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Children’s Hospital Basel, 4056 Basel, Switzerland
Interests: pediatric surgery; Hirschsprung’s disease; anorectal malformations; surgery; gastroenterology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pediatric bowel diseases include a broad spectrum of inborn and acquired disorders with a high impact on quality of life.

Treatment guidelines for pediatric bowel diseases are often missing due to limited evidence. This Special Issue intends to give the reader an update on pediatric bowel disorders with a special focus on surgical and non-surgical treatment options as well as the transition period from childhood to adulthood.

Clinical, basic science, and translational studies related to pediatric bowel diseases are welcome.

What kind of papers we are soliciting: Studies addressing pathophysiology, epidemiology, and/or treatment (including confirmation or refutation of conventional therapies, novel treatments, and treatment guidelines) are highly appreciated.

Prof. Dr. Stefan Holland-Cunz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • newborn
  • child
  • intestine
  • disease
  • surgery
  • treatment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 1231 KiB  
Article
Small Intestinal Polyp Burden in Pediatric Peutz–Jeghers Syndrome Assessed through Capsule Endoscopy: A Longitudinal Study
by Jeremy Stewart, Nathan R. Fleishman, Vincent S. Staggs, Mike Thomson, Nicole Stoecklein, Caitlin E. Lawson, Michael P. Washburn, Shahid Umar and Thomas M. Attard
Children 2023, 10(10), 1680; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10101680 - 12 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1032
Abstract
The management of pediatric Peutz–Jeghers Syndrome (PJS) focuses on the prevention of intussusception complicating small intestinal (SI) polyposis. This hinges on the accurate appraisal of the polyp burden to tailor therapeutic interventions. Video Capsule Endoscopy (VCE) is an established tool to study SI [...] Read more.
The management of pediatric Peutz–Jeghers Syndrome (PJS) focuses on the prevention of intussusception complicating small intestinal (SI) polyposis. This hinges on the accurate appraisal of the polyp burden to tailor therapeutic interventions. Video Capsule Endoscopy (VCE) is an established tool to study SI polyps in children, but an in-depth characterization of polyp burden in this population is lacking. Methods: We performed a retrospective longitudinal cross-sectional analysis of VCE studies in pediatric PJS patients at our institution (CMKC) from 2010 to 2020. Demographic, clinical, and VCE findings reported by three reviewers in tandem were accrued. Polyp burden variables were modeled as functions of patient and study characteristics using linear mixed models adjusted for clustering. Results: The cohort included 15 patients. The total small bowel polyp count and largest polyp size clustered under 30 polyps and <20 mm in size. Luminal occlusion correlated closely with the estimated polyp size. Polyp distribution favored proximal (77%) over distal (66%) small bowel involvement. The adjusted largest polyp size was greater in males. Double Balloon Enteroscopy was associated with a decreased polyp burden. Conclusions: The polyp burden in pediatric PJS patients favors the proximal third of the small intestine, with relatively small numbers and a polyp size amenable to resection through enteroscopy. Male gender and older age were related to an increased polyp burden. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Treatment of Pediatric Bowel Diseases)
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Review

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5 pages, 187 KiB  
Review
Low Copper Diet—A Therapeutic Option for Wilson Disease?
by Ulrike Teufel-Schäfer, Christine Forster and Nikolaus Schaefer
Children 2022, 9(8), 1132; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9081132 - 28 Jul 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1726
Abstract
Wilson’s disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive inherited disease in which a pathological storage of copper in various organs is the mean pathophysiological mechanism. The therapy consists of drug therapy with chelating agents or zinc. For patients, nutrition is always an important issue. [...] Read more.
Wilson’s disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive inherited disease in which a pathological storage of copper in various organs is the mean pathophysiological mechanism. The therapy consists of drug therapy with chelating agents or zinc. For patients, nutrition is always an important issue. The aim of this review was to determine whether there are clear recommendations for a low copper diet for WD patients, or whether the essential trace element zinc plays a role? We were able to show that some of the foods with high copper content would have to be consumed in such large quantities that this is regularly not the case. Furthermore, there are also different absorption rates depending on the copper content. A lower copper intake only prevents the re-accumulation of copper. In summary, consistent adherence to drug therapy is more important than a strict diet. Only two foods should be consistently avoided: Liver and Shellfish. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Treatment of Pediatric Bowel Diseases)
38 pages, 6226 KiB  
Review
Surgical Treatment of Short Bowel Syndrome—The Past, the Present and the Future, a Descriptive Review of the Literature
by Julian L. Muff, Filipp Sokolovski, Zarah Walsh-Korb, Rashikh A. Choudhury, James C. Y. Dunn, Stefan G. Holland-Cunz and Raphael N. Vuille-dit-Bille
Children 2022, 9(7), 1024; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9071024 - 10 Jul 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3699
Abstract
Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating disorder with both short- and long-term implications for patients. Unfortunately, the prevalence of SBS has doubled over the past 40 years. Broadly speaking, the etiology of SBS can be categorized as congenital or secondary, the latter [...] Read more.
Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating disorder with both short- and long-term implications for patients. Unfortunately, the prevalence of SBS has doubled over the past 40 years. Broadly speaking, the etiology of SBS can be categorized as congenital or secondary, the latter typically due to extensive small bowel resection following diseases of the small intestine, e.g., necrotizing enterocolitis, Hirschsprung’s disease or intestinal atresia. As of yet, no cure exists, thus, conservative treatment, primarily parenteral nutrition (PN), is the first-line therapy. In some cases, weaning from PN is not possible and operative therapy is required. The invention of the longitudinal intestinal lengthening and tailoring (LILT or Bianchi) procedure in 1980 was a major step forward in patient care and spawned further techniques that continue to improve lives for patients with severe SBS (e.g., double barrel enteroplasty, serial transverse enteroplasty, etc.). With this review, we aim to provide an overview of the clinical implications of SBS, common conservative therapies and the development of operative techniques over the past six decades. We also provide a short outlook on the future of operative techniques, specifically with respect to regenerative medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Treatment of Pediatric Bowel Diseases)
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13 pages, 489 KiB  
Review
Therapy Strategies for Children Suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)—A Narrative Review
by Corinne Légeret, Raoul Furlano and Henrik Köhler
Children 2022, 9(5), 617; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9050617 - 26 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2105
Abstract
The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing, and more children at a younger age are affected. The pathogenesis seems to be an interaction of microbial factors, a sensitivity of the immune system, and the intestinal barrier, leading to an inappropriate immune [...] Read more.
The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing, and more children at a younger age are affected. The pathogenesis seems to be an interaction of microbial factors, a sensitivity of the immune system, and the intestinal barrier, leading to an inappropriate immune response. Not only has the role of biological agents become more important in the last decade in the treatment of children and adolescents, but also new insights into the composition of the gastrointestinal microbiome and personal diet implications have increased our understanding of the disease and opened up potential therapeutic pathways. This narrative review provides an overview of current recommendations, therapeutic options, drug monitoring, and practical guidelines for paediatricians involved with paediatric IBD patients. Furthermore, the off-label use of potential helpful drugs in the treatment of these patients is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Treatment of Pediatric Bowel Diseases)
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