Abdominal Surgery in Pediatrics Update

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Surgery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2024) | Viewed by 2475

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Pediatric Surgery and Urology, Institute of Maternal and Child Health - IRCCS "Burlo Garofolo", 34137 Trieste, Italy
Interests: endoscopic surgery; prenatal diagnostics and counselling; pulmonary malformation; short bowel; bacterial translocation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is a great honor to serve as the Guest Editor for this Special Issue of Children, entitled “Abdominal Surgery in Pediatrics”.

Pediatric abdominal surgery is a vast field. The younger the child, the higher the incidence of connatal malformations that require surgery. Nevertheless, malignant diseases of solid organs, and a continuously rising number of inflammatory diseases in children and adolescents, represent an important issue. Moreover, acute abdominal diseases such as appendicitis, intussusception, volvulus, and all kinds of herniation are important topics. The strategies in surgical therapy are continuously changing and are always the subject of academic discussion. Minimally invasive approaches, interdisciplinary treatment strategies, robotics, endoscopic surgery, and new techniques are of great interest. However, not all of these “new” strategies are validated and always better just because they are modern and popular.

The goal of this Special Issue is for academics to discuss any of these mentioned topics and to share their experiences related to this field

Surgeons and researchers are encouraged to contribute their most innovative manuscripts. A variety of contributions to this Special Issue are welcomed: experimental papers, review articles, systemic reviews, proposals for new strategic approaches, and prospective/retrospective case studies. We will not publish single case reports.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Jurgen Schleef
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • acute abdominal disease
  • surgical technique
  • complications in abdominal surgery
  • interdisciplinary strategies
  • long-term follow up
  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • metabolic aspects of abdominal surgery

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 1896 KiB  
Article
Ureterocystoplasty in Boys with Valve Bladder Syndrome—Is This Method Still up to Date?
by Aybike Hofmann, Alexandros Ioannou, Pirmin Irenaeus Zöhrer and Wolfgang H. Rösch
Children 2023, 10(4), 692; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10040692 - 06 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1001
Abstract
Boys with valve bladder syndrome (PUV) require adequate treatment of the lower urinary tract to preserve renal function and improve long-term outcomes. In some patients, further surgery may be necessary to improve bladder capacity and function. Ureterocytoplasty (UCP) is usually carried out with [...] Read more.
Boys with valve bladder syndrome (PUV) require adequate treatment of the lower urinary tract to preserve renal function and improve long-term outcomes. In some patients, further surgery may be necessary to improve bladder capacity and function. Ureterocytoplasty (UCP) is usually carried out with a small segment of intestine or, alternatively, with a dilated ureter. Our aim was to evaluate the long-term outcomes after UCP in boys with PUV. UCP had been performed in 10 boys with PUV at our hospital (2004–2019). Pre- and postoperative data were evaluated in relation to kidney and bladder function, the SWRD score, additional surgery, complications, and long-term follow-up. The mean time between primary valve ablation and UCP was 3.5 years (SD ± 2.0). The median follow-up time was 64.5 months (IQR 36.0–97.25). The mean increase in age-adjusted bladder capacity was 25% (from 77% (SD ± 0.28) to 102% (SD ± 0.46)). Eight boys micturated spontaneously. Ultrasounds showed no severe hydronephrosis (grade 3–4). The SWRD score showed a median decrease from 4.5 (range 2–7) to 3.0 (range 1–5). No conversion of augmentation was required. UCP is a safe and effective approach to improve bladder capacity in boys with PUV. In addition, the possibility of micturating naturally is still maintained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abdominal Surgery in Pediatrics Update)
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Review

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13 pages, 266 KiB  
Review
Surgical versus Medical Management of Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis—Case Compilation and Review of the Literature
by Maria Noelle Hüpper, Judith Pichler, Wolf-Dietrich Huber, Andreas Heilos, Rebecca Schaup, Martin Metzelder and Sophie Langer
Children 2023, 10(6), 949; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10060949 - 26 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1117
Abstract
(1) Background: Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a rare cause of liver failure. Surgical biliary diversion (SBD) and ileal bile salt inhibitors (IBAT) can delay or prevent liver transplantation (LTX). A comparison of the two methodologies in the literature is lacking. The [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a rare cause of liver failure. Surgical biliary diversion (SBD) and ileal bile salt inhibitors (IBAT) can delay or prevent liver transplantation (LTX). A comparison of the two methodologies in the literature is lacking. The combination has not been investigated. (2) Methods: We performed a literature survey on medical and surgical treatments for PFIC and reviewed the charts of our patients with PFIC of a tertiary hospital. The end points of our analysis were a decrease in serum bile acid (sBA) levels, reduction of pruritus and delay or avoidance of (LTX). (3) Results: We included 17 case series on SBD with more than 5 patients and a total of 536 patients. External or internal SBD, either conventional or minimally invasive, can reduce pruritus and sBA, but not all PFIC types are suitable for SBD. Six publications described the use of two types of IBAT in PFIC with a total of 118 patients. Treatment response was dependent on genetic type and subtype. Patients with PFIC 2 (nt-BSEP) showed the best response to treatment. Four out of eleven PFIC patients underwent SBD at our centre, with two currently receiving IBAT. (4) Conclusions: Limited data on IBAT in selected patients with PFIC show safety and effectiveness, although surgical methods should still be considered as a successful bridging procedure. Further studies to evaluate a possible combination of IBAT and SBD in PFIC are warranted and treatment decision should be discussed in an interdisciplinary board. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abdominal Surgery in Pediatrics Update)
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