Consequences of SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Children and Changes in Pediatric Emergency Care

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Global and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 1441

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
UOC di Pediatria e Neonatologia - Polo Pontino, Dipartimento Materno Infantile e di Scienze Urologiche, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma, Italy
Interests: nephrology; emergency pediatrics; COVID-19

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Guest Editor
UOC di Pediatria e Neonatologia - Polo Pontino, Dipartimento Materno Infantile e di Scienze Urologiche, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma, Italy
Interests: pneumology; emergency pediatrics; COVID-19

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are planning a new Special Issue in Children, entitled “Consequences of SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Children: Inflammatory Multisystem Syndrome, Long Covid Syndrome and Changes in Pediatric Care”. Since the beginning of the pandemic, the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the pediatric population has been mild compared with that on adults. However, children can also present with complications related to SARS-CoV-2 infection, mainly represented by the Inflammatory Multisystem syndrome (MIS-C) and Long Covid syndrome.

As these are two new pathological conditions, their etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment are still under study.

Furthermore, the pandemic has indirectly caused changes in pediatric care, characterized by a drastic decrease in emergency department accesses, changes in the main reasons for accessing hospital care, and reduction in the main common seasonal diseases.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect the main and most recent evidence on MIS-C and Long Covid COVID-19 in pediatric age and to analyze what happened in pediatric emergency care during the pandemic in order to highlight many aspects that could be improved in future.

Dr. Riccardo Lubrano
Dr. Silvia Bloise
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • inflammatory multisystem syndrome
  • long COVID
  • children
  • emergency
  • infection
  • pediatric care

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 863 KiB  
Article
SARS-CoV-2 and Swabs: Disease Severity and the Numbers of Cycles of Gene Amplification, Single Center Experience
by Raffaele Falsaperla, Vincenzo Sortino, Ausilia Desiree Collotta, Silvia Marino, Piero Pavone, Laura Grassi, Grete Francesca Privitera and Martino Ruggieri
Children 2023, 10(5), 841; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10050841 - 06 May 2023
Viewed by 1102
Abstract
Pediatric COVID-19 determines a mild clinical picture, but few data have been published about the correlation between disease severity and PCR amplification cycles of SARS-CoV-2 from respiratory samples. This correlation is clinically important because it permits the stratification of patients in relation to [...] Read more.
Pediatric COVID-19 determines a mild clinical picture, but few data have been published about the correlation between disease severity and PCR amplification cycles of SARS-CoV-2 from respiratory samples. This correlation is clinically important because it permits the stratification of patients in relation to their risk of developing a serious disease. Therefore, the primary endpoint of this study was to establish whether disease severity at the onset, when evaluated with a LqSOFA score, correlated with the gene amplification of SARS-CoV-2. LqSOFA score, also named the Liverpool quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment, is a pediatric score that indicates the severity of illness with a range from 0 to 4 that incorporates age-adjusted heart rate, respiratory rate, capillary refill and consciousness level (AVPU). The secondary endpoint was to determine if this score could predict the days of duration for symptoms and positive swabs. Our study included 124 patients aged between 0 and 18 years. The LqSOFA score was negatively correlated with the number of PCR amplification cycles, but this was not significant (Pearson’s index −0.14, p-value 0.13). Instead, the correlation between the LqSOFA score and the duration of symptoms was positively related and statistically significant (Pearson’s index 0.20, p-value 0.02), such as the correlation between the LqSOFA score and the duration of a positive swab (Pearson’s index 0.40, p-value < 0.01). So, the LqSOFA score upon admission may predict the duration of symptoms and positive swabs; the PCR amplification of SARS-CoV-2 appears not to play a key role at onset in the prediction of disease severity. Full article
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