Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents: 2nd Edition

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Global and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 March 2023) | Viewed by 6362

Special Issue Editor

Faculty of Health, Madrid Open University, Carretera de La Coruña, KM.38,500, Vía de, Servicio, nº 15, 28400 Collado Villalba, Madrid, Spain
Interests: eating disorders; obesity; body image; clinical psycology; health
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Considering the success and popularity of the Special Issue "Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents", previously published in the journal Children (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/children/special_issues/Eating_Disorders_Children_Adolescents), we now release a second volume that aims to gather original research papers and review articles focused on eating disorders and obesity in children.

Obesity and eating disorders continue to be serious health problems among children and adolescents. Eating disorders generate biomedical problems, but also psychological and psychosocial problems, many of which are little-known, such as discrimination in different environments.

It is still necessary to delve into the etiology of these disorders and propose effective evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment strategies. Quality scientific papers that explore these aspects are welcome in this second volume of the Special Issue.

Dr. Jose I Baile
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • obesity
  • eating disorders
  • anorexia nervosa
  • bulima nervosa
  • binge eating disorder
  • children
  • adolescents

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 1854 KiB  
Article
Cognitive and Interpersonal Factors in Adolescent Inpatients with Anorexia Nervosa: A Network Analysis
Children 2023, 10(4), 730; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10040730 - 15 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1341
Abstract
The cognitive-interpersonal model of anorexia nervosa (AN) posits that cognitive and interpersonal traits contribute to the development and maintenance of AN. We investigated cognitive and interpersonal factors put forward by the model in a sample of 145 adolescent inpatients with AN using network [...] Read more.
The cognitive-interpersonal model of anorexia nervosa (AN) posits that cognitive and interpersonal traits contribute to the development and maintenance of AN. We investigated cognitive and interpersonal factors put forward by the model in a sample of 145 adolescent inpatients with AN using network analysis. Our main outcomes included core eating disorder symptoms, cognitive style, socio-affective factors, and mood symptoms. We estimated a cross-sectional network using graphical LASSO. Core and bridge symptoms were identified using strength centrality. Goldbricker was used to reduce topological overlap. The node with the highest strength centrality was Concern over Mistakes, followed by Eating Preoccupation, Social Fear, and Overvaluation of Weight and Shape. The nodes with the highest bridge strength were Concern over Mistakes, Doubt about Actions, Overvaluation of Weight and Shape, and Depression. Notably, both performance on a cognitive flexibility task and BMI were not connected to any other nodes and were subsequently removed from the final network. We provide partial support for the cognitive-interpersonal model while also supporting certain premises put forward by the transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral model. The high centrality of Concern over Mistakes and Social Fear supports the theory that both cognitive and interpersonal difficulties contribute to AN, particularly in adolescence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents: 2nd Edition)
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13 pages, 828 KiB  
Article
Study of Different Personalised Dietary Plans on Eating Behaviour, Body Image and Mood in Young Female Professional Handball Players: A Randomised Controlled Trial
Children 2023, 10(2), 259; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10020259 - 31 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1895
Abstract
Low energy availability may precede or be caused by cognitive disturbances in professional athletes. Related psychological problems include disordered eating patterns, body shape preoccupation, depression or anxiety. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of different personalised dietary plans on [...] Read more.
Low energy availability may precede or be caused by cognitive disturbances in professional athletes. Related psychological problems include disordered eating patterns, body shape preoccupation, depression or anxiety. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of different personalised dietary plans on psychological factors in young professional female handball players with low energy availability. This 12-week randomised clinical trial involved 21 female players aged 22 ± 4 years, 172.0 ± 5.4 cm and 68.4 ± 6.7 kg divided into three groups (FD: free diet; MD: Mediterranean diet; HAD: high antioxidant diet). Eating behaviour (Eating Attitude Test, EAT-26: diet, bulimia and oral control subscales), body image (Body Shape Questionnaire, BSQ) and mood state (Profile of Mode State, POMS: tension, vigour, anger, depression, fatigue) were assessed. All participants showed low energy availability (<30 kcal/lean mass per day). The different plans showed no significant differences between them but significant differences over time within groups for the variables: body image, Tension, Vigour and Depression (p < 0.05). Eating behaviour improved slightly but did not show statistically significant changes. Following an adequate nutritional planning for athletes seems to improve the mood and body perception of young female handball players. A longer intervention period is required to assess the differences between diets and improvement of other parameters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents: 2nd Edition)
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Review

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20 pages, 1312 KiB  
Review
Links between Childhood Obesity, High-Fat Diet, and Central Precocious Puberty
Children 2023, 10(2), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10020241 - 29 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2537
Abstract
In recent years, the existing relationship between excess overweight and central precocious puberty (CPP) has been reported, especially in girls. Different nutritional choices have been associated with different patterns of puberty. In particular, the involvement of altered biochemical and neuroendocrine pathways and a [...] Read more.
In recent years, the existing relationship between excess overweight and central precocious puberty (CPP) has been reported, especially in girls. Different nutritional choices have been associated with different patterns of puberty. In particular, the involvement of altered biochemical and neuroendocrine pathways and a proinflammatory status has been described in connection with a high-fat diet (HFD). In this narrative review, we present an overview on the relationship between obesity and precocious pubertal development, focusing on the role of HFDs as a contributor to activating the hypothalamus–pituitary–gonadal axis. Although evidence is scarce and studies limited, especially in the paediatric field, the harm of HFDs on PP is a relevant problem that cannot be ignored. Increased knowledge about HFD effects will be useful in developing strategies preventing precocious puberty in children with obesity. Promoting HFD-avoiding behavior may be useful in preserving children’s physiological development and protecting reproductive health. Controlling HFDs may represent a target for policy action to improve global health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents: 2nd Edition)
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