Special Issue "New Research Progress on Endocrine Dysfunction in Children"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Global and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2023) | Viewed by 801

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Ahmet Anık
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Aydın Adnan Menderes University, Aydın 09100, Turkey
Interests: pediatric endocrinology; childhood obesity; diabetes mellitus

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am honored to be the guest editor for this Special Issue of /Children/ entitled “New Research Progress on Endocrine Dysfunction in Children”.

Endocrine disorders in children can encompass a wide range of conditions that affect the hormone-producing glands and their function. Some common endocrine problems in children include growth hormone/IGF1 axis disorders, precocious and delayed puberty, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, obesity, bone diseases, and diabetes mellitus. Ongoing research in the field of pediatric endocrinology aims to improve our understanding of these disorders, develop more accurate diagnostic methods, and discover effective treatment options.

The goal of this Special Issue is to present the latest research on the etiology, physiopathology, screening, diagnosis, and management related to endocrinologic diseases in children and adolescents.

We invite investigators to contribute original research articles, case reports, and comprehensive review articles that will improve our understanding in the challenging field of pediatric endocrinology.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Ahmet Anık
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • children
  • endocrinology
  • diabetes
  • obesity
  • thyroid
  • genetic
  • growth
  • puberty
  • adrenal
  • bone

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 1426 KiB  
Article
The Association of Serum Uric Acid Levels and Various Uric Acid-Related Ratios with Insulin Resistance and Obesity: A Preliminary Study in Adolescents
Children 2023, 10(9), 1493; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10091493 - 31 Aug 2023
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Abstract
Background: Studies have shown that serum uric acid levels and uric acid-related ratios, such as uric acid-to-albumin ratio (UAR), uric acid-to-creatinine ratio (UCR), uric acid-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL cholesterol) ratio (UHR), and uric acid-to-lymphocyte ratio (ULR), are associated with various diseases and their [...] Read more.
Background: Studies have shown that serum uric acid levels and uric acid-related ratios, such as uric acid-to-albumin ratio (UAR), uric acid-to-creatinine ratio (UCR), uric acid-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL cholesterol) ratio (UHR), and uric acid-to-lymphocyte ratio (ULR), are associated with various diseases and their complications, and that these ratios can be used as biomarkers. In the current study, we aimed to investigate uric acid levels in obese adolescents and the relationship of uric acid-related ratios with insulin resistance and obesity for the first time in the literature. Methods: A total of 100 adolescents (60 obese and 40 healthy) aged 10–17 years were retrospectively included. Participants were assigned to two groups: the obese group and the healthy control group. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) >the 95th percentile for age and gender. Demographic and laboratory data (serum glucose, urea, creatinine, uric acid, albumin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), C-reactive protein (CRP), total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free T4 (fT4), insulin levels, and complete blood count) were obtained from the laboratory information management system. A homeostatic model of assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL cholesterol), and uric acid-related ratios were calculated. Results: Uric acid, UAR, UCR, and UHR levels of obese adolescents were significantly higher than the healthy group (p < 0.05). We found that HOMA-IR was positively correlated with uric acid, UAR, and UHR. No correlation was found between BMI and uric acid or uric acid-related ratios. We did not find any difference between the two groups in terms of ULR levels, and we did not find any correlation between BMI and HOMA-IR. Conclusion: High levels of serum uric acid, UAR, UCR, and UHR were associated with obesity. Furthermore, we found that uric acid, UAR, and UHR were positively correlated with insulin resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research Progress on Endocrine Dysfunction in Children)
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