Treatment of Childhood Fractures and Trauma

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Orthopedics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 February 2025 | Viewed by 999

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, Musculoskeletal Universitycenter Munich (MUM), LMU University Hospital, LMU Munich Marchioninistrasse 15, 81337 Munich, Germany
2. Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. von Hauner Children’s Hospital, LMU University Hospital, 80337 Munich, Germany
3. Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Interests: pediatric trauma; posttraumatic deformities; polytrauma management

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Guest Editor
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. von Hauner Children’s Hospital, LMU University Hospital, Lindwurmstrasse 4, 80337 Munich, Germany
Interests: pediatric trauma; pediatric burns; pediatric foregut disease; esophageal atresia; minimal-invasive pediatric surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pediatric trauma is a common occurrence and carries a substantial risk of long-term morbidity and disability. However, expertise in this area is often diluted because most pediatric trauma is managed in facilities that mainly treat adult patients. Treatment of children, however, requires special expertise. Treatment of two age groups are particularly controversial: those very young (under 5 years of age) and adolescents. In young children, a nonoperative approach often yields better results. If operative intervention is considered, care must be taken not to compromise long-term growth by injury to the growth plates. In the older group, the question arises of at what stage adolescent patients should be subjected to adult surgical methods.

This issue focuses on patients in the aforementioned age groups, comparing different contemporary and innovative therapeutic methods, as well as nonoperative and operative algorithms. We will address the treatment of post-traumatic deformities and indications for surgical intervention. In addition, international experts discuss current pediatric polytrauma management, and how to deal with nonaccidental trauma.

We hope that, with this Special Issue, we can provide a guide for this special patient population.

Dr. Ferdinand Wagner
Prof. Dr. Oliver J. Muensterer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pediatric trauma
  • pediatric trauma imaging
  • growth guidance
  • pediatric polytrauma management
  • nonaccidental trauma in children

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 425 KiB  
Article
Validation of the Conventional Trauma and Injury Severity Score and a Newly Developed Survival Predictive Model in Pediatric Patients with Blunt Trauma: A Nationwide Observation Study
by Chiaki Toida, Takashi Muguruma, Masayasu Gakumazawa, Mafumi Shinohara, Takeru Abe and Ichiro Takeuchi
Children 2023, 10(9), 1542; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10091542 - 12 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 715
Abstract
To date, there is no clinically useful prediction model that is suitable for Japanese pediatric trauma patients. Herein, this study aimed to developed a model for predicting the survival of Japanese pediatric patients with blunt trauma and compare its validity with that of [...] Read more.
To date, there is no clinically useful prediction model that is suitable for Japanese pediatric trauma patients. Herein, this study aimed to developed a model for predicting the survival of Japanese pediatric patients with blunt trauma and compare its validity with that of the conventional TRISS model. Patients registered in the Japan Trauma Data Bank were grouped into a derivation cohort (2009–2013) and validation cohort (2014–2018). Logistic regression analysis was performed using the derivation dataset to establish prediction models using age, injury severity, and physiology. The validity of the modified model was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Among 11 predictor models, Model 1 and Model 11 had the best performance (AUC = 0.980). The AUC of all models was lower in patients with survival probability Ps < 0.5 than in patients with Ps ≥ 0.5. The AUC of all models was lower in neonates/infants than in other age categories. Model 11 also had the best performance (AUC = 0.762 and 0.909, respectively) in patients with Ps < 0.5 and neonates/infants. The predictive ability of the newly modified models was not superior to that of the current TRISS model. Our results may be useful to develop a highly accurate prediction model based on the new predictive variables and cutoff values associated with the survival mortality of injured Japanese pediatric patients who are younger and more severely injured by using a nationwide dataset with fewer missing data and added valuables, which can be used to evaluate the age-related physiological and anatomical severity of injured patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Treatment of Childhood Fractures and Trauma)
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