Solid State Gas Sensors

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2014) | Viewed by 53886

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, Messina University, Piazza Pugliatti, 1, 98122 Messina, Italy
Interests: synthesis of novel sensing materials; nanostructured materials for chemical and electrochemical sensing; metal oxide semiconductor-based gas sensors; biosensors; fabrication of chemical sensors; environmental sensors; automotive gas sensors; biomedical sensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, University of Messina, 98166 Messina, Italy
Interests: sensor development and characterization; sensor- based measurement systems; microwave characterization; biomedical sensors; gas sensor for health care and environmental monitoring
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Solid state gas sensors based on electrical and electrochemical transduction principles have attracted intensive research interest in the past years and have been used for a wide range of applications, due to their numerous advantages, like small sizes, high sensitivities in detecting very low concentrations of gaseous species (at level of ppm or even ppb), possibility of on-line measurements and low cost.

Nowadays, modern technology is demanding more efficient gas sensors for advanced applications. Consequently, there is a considerable effort towards the goal of high performance gas sensors with enhanced integration into electronic circuitry employing microelectronics technology. These mass-produced gas sensors could open up mass markets for the industry and environmental monitoring, the automotive and biomedicine field.

The development of nanotechnology has created enormous potential to develop highly sensitive, low cost, portable sensors with low power consumption. The sensor miniaturization could lead to new extensive applications, for examples in cell phones and watches, then affecting our everyday lives. Thus, great efforts in the ongoing research are directed to the synthesis of sensing materials with peculiar nanostructures, because of their high surface-to-volume ratio, charge confinement ability and improved electronic properties.

This Special Issue is therefore intended to encourage researchers worldwide to report their new results in research and development that focus on the most recent advances and overview in nanomaterial science for applications in solid state gas sensors along with their relevant features and technological aspects, Original research papers are welcome (but not limited) on all aspects that focus on the most recent advances in: (i) basic principles of gas and VOCs sensors; (ii) nanostructured materials for semiconductor and electrochemical gas sensors; (iii) new gas sensor principles and technologies; (iv) gas sensor based systems and applications.

Prof. Giovanni Neri
Guest Editor

Dr. Nicola Donato
Associate Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • New gas sensor principles and technologies
  • Nanostructured sensing materials
  • Functionalized and hybrid nanomaterials
  • Semiconductor and electrochemical gas sensors
  • Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sensors
  • E-nose based systems and applications

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

452 KiB  
Article
Synthesis, Characterization and Sensing Properties of AZO and IZO Nanomaterials
by Mokhtar Hjiri, Lassaad El Mir and Salvatore Gianluca Leonardi
Chemosensors 2014, 2(2), 121-130; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors2020121 - 23 May 2014
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 9275
Abstract
Al-doped ZnO (AZO) and In-doped ZnO (IZO) nanopowders were prepared by a sol-gel route and subsequent drying in ethanol under supercritical conditions. The morphological and microstructural properties were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization study [...] Read more.
Al-doped ZnO (AZO) and In-doped ZnO (IZO) nanopowders were prepared by a sol-gel route and subsequent drying in ethanol under supercritical conditions. The morphological and microstructural properties were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization study showed that the AZO and IZO nanoparticles were crystalline and exhibited the hexagonal wurtzite structure. Chemoresistive devices consisting of a thick layer of synthesized nanoparticles on interdigitated alumina substrates have been fabricated and their electrical and sensing characteristics were investigated. The sensor performances of the AZO and IZO nanoparticles for carbon monoxide (CO) were reported. The results indicated that both doped-sensors exhibited higher response and quick response/recovery dynamics compared to a ZnO-based sensor. These interesting sensing properties were discussed on the basis of the characterization data reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid State Gas Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

1489 KiB  
Article
Equivalent Circuit Models for Determination of the Relation between the Sensing Behavior and Properties of Undoped/Cr Doped TiO2 NTs
by Yakup Gönüllü, Klemens Kelm, Sanjay Mathur and Bilge Saruhan
Chemosensors 2014, 2(1), 69-84; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors2010069 - 20 Feb 2014
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 7916
Abstract
High-temperature gas sensing requires the increase of sensitivity and reduction of cross-sensitivity. The use of TiO2-Nanotubular layers as gas sensors has shown that the selectivity and sensitivity can be influenced by doping with trivalent elements and by optimization of morphological aspects [...] Read more.
High-temperature gas sensing requires the increase of sensitivity and reduction of cross-sensitivity. The use of TiO2-Nanotubular layers as gas sensors has shown that the selectivity and sensitivity can be influenced by doping with trivalent elements and by optimization of morphological aspects such as pore diameter and nanotube length. In this work, focus has been given on the understanding of the effect of doping and properties of nano-tubular TiO2-layers on sensing behavior and mechanism toward NO2 by using equivalent circuit modeling achieved by impedance spectroscopic measurements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid State Gas Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

865 KiB  
Article
A Method for Integrating ZnO Coated Nanosprings into a Low Cost Redox-Based Chemical Sensor and Catalytic Tool for Determining Gas Phase Reaction Kinetics
by Pavel V. Bakharev, Vladimir V. Dobrokhotov and David N. McIlroy
Chemosensors 2014, 2(1), 56-68; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors2010056 - 27 Jan 2014
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 6424
Abstract
A chemical sensor (chemiresistor) was constructed from a xenon light bulb by coating it with a 3-D zinc oxide coated silica nanospring mat, where the xenon light bulb serves as the sensor heater. The sensor response to toluene as a function of xenon [...] Read more.
A chemical sensor (chemiresistor) was constructed from a xenon light bulb by coating it with a 3-D zinc oxide coated silica nanospring mat, where the xenon light bulb serves as the sensor heater. The sensor response to toluene as a function of xenon light bulb sensor temperature (TLB) and vapor temperature (TV) was observed and analyzed. The optimum operational parameters in terms of TLB and TV were determined to be 435 °C and 250 °C, respectively. The activation energy of toluene oxidation (Ed) on the ZnO surface was determined to be 87 kJ·mol−1, while the activation energy of oxidation (Ea) of the depleted ZnO surface was determined to be 83 kJ·mol−1. This study serves as proof of principle for integrating nanomaterials into an inexpensive sensor platform, which can also be used to characterize gas-solid, or vapor-solid, redox processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid State Gas Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

1052 KiB  
Review
First Fifty Years of Chemoresistive Gas Sensors
by Giovanni Neri
Chemosensors 2015, 3(1), 1-20; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors3010001 - 05 Jan 2015
Cited by 357 | Viewed by 22104
Abstract
The first fifty years of chemoresistive sensors for gas detection are here reviewed, focusing on the main scientific and technological innovations that have occurred in the field over the course of these years. A look at advances made in fundamental and applied research [...] Read more.
The first fifty years of chemoresistive sensors for gas detection are here reviewed, focusing on the main scientific and technological innovations that have occurred in the field over the course of these years. A look at advances made in fundamental and applied research and leading to the development of actual high performance chemoresistive devices is presented. The approaches devoted to the synthesis of novel semiconducting materials with unprecedented nanostructure and gas-sensing properties have been also presented. Perspectives on new technologies and future applications of chemoresistive gas sensors have also been highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid State Gas Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

511 KiB  
Review
Luminescent Oxygen Gas Sensors Based on Nanometer-Thick Hybrid Films of Iridium Complexes and Clay Minerals
by Hisako Sato, Kenji Tamura and Akihiko Yamagishi
Chemosensors 2014, 2(1), 41-55; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors2010041 - 17 Jan 2014
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 7234
Abstract
The use of Ir(III) complexes in photo-responsive molecular devices for oxygen gas sensing is reviewed. Attention is focused on the immobilization of Ir(III) complexes in organic or inorganic host materials such as polymers, silica and clays in order to enhance robustness and reliability. [...] Read more.
The use of Ir(III) complexes in photo-responsive molecular devices for oxygen gas sensing is reviewed. Attention is focused on the immobilization of Ir(III) complexes in organic or inorganic host materials such as polymers, silica and clays in order to enhance robustness and reliability. Our recent works on constructing nanometer-thick films comprised of cyclometalated cationic Ir(III) complexes and clay minerals are described. The achievement of multi-emitting properties in response to oxygen pressure is demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid State Gas Sensors)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop