Chemical Sensors Based on Low-Dimensional Semiconductors

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials for Chemical Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 6340

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Integrated Circuits, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, China
Interests: electronics; semiconductor; quantum dot; chemosensor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chemosensor technology is being advanced by innovations in the development of low-dimensional semiconductors such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, black phosphorus, and quantum dots. These sensors can provide highly sensitive and selective responses to target chemicals due to the unique electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductors, making them useful for various applications, including environmental monitoring, hazardous waste monitoring, medical diagnosis, and industrial process control.

This Special Issue aims to highlight recent advances and applications of the low-dimensional semiconductor-based chemical sensors. Authors are therefore invited to submit works related to novel materials, sensor structures, mechanism studies, and applications. Both review articles and research papers are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Huan Liu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • low-dimensional semiconductor
  • gas sensor
  • humidity sensor
  • ion sensor
  • multi-purpose chemosensor
  • intelligent chemosensor
  • chemosensor chip

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 2728 KiB  
Article
Gold Nanoparticles in Porous Silicon Nanotubes for Glucose Detection
by Roberto Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Evan Hathaway, Jeffery L. Coffer, Roxana M. del Castillo, Yuankun Lin and Jingbiao Cui
Chemosensors 2024, 12(4), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors12040063 - 15 Apr 2024
Viewed by 627
Abstract
Silicon nanotubes (Si NTs) have a unique structure among the silicon nanostructure family, which is useful for diverse applications ranging from therapeutics to lithium storage/recycling. Their well-defined structure and high surface area make them ideal for sensing applications. In this work, we demonstrate [...] Read more.
Silicon nanotubes (Si NTs) have a unique structure among the silicon nanostructure family, which is useful for diverse applications ranging from therapeutics to lithium storage/recycling. Their well-defined structure and high surface area make them ideal for sensing applications. In this work, we demonstrate the formation of Au nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with 4-Mercaptophenylboronic acid (MPBA) on porous Si NTs (pSi NTs) fabricated using ZnO nanowires as a template. The system was characterized, and the proposed structure was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Varying glucose concentrations in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (0.5–80 mM) were introduced to the Si NT nanocomposite system. The glucose is detectable at low concentrations utilizing surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), which shows a concentration-dependent peak shift in the benzene ring breathing mode (~1071 cm−1) of MPBA. Complementing these measurements are simulations of the Raman hot spots associated with plasmonic enhancement of the Au NPs using COMSOL. This biocompatible system is envisioned to have applications in nanomedicine and microfluidic devices for real-time, non-invasive glucose sensing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Sensors Based on Low-Dimensional Semiconductors)
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14 pages, 4827 KiB  
Article
Preparation and Optimization of Mesoporous SnO2 Quantum Dot Thin Film Gas Sensors for H2S Detection Using XGBoost Parameter Importance Analysis
by Jianqiao Liu, Yujia Wang, Yue Sun, Kuanguang Zhang, Yang Ding, Ce Fu and Junsheng Wang
Chemosensors 2023, 11(10), 525; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11100525 - 05 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1425
Abstract
Tin oxide (SnO2) is a traditional gas-sensitive semiconductor with excellent response to various gases. However, its sensor performances are attenuated by the utility factor during gas diffusion in the sensing body. Therefore, the rational design of microstructure of devices is attractive [...] Read more.
Tin oxide (SnO2) is a traditional gas-sensitive semiconductor with excellent response to various gases. However, its sensor performances are attenuated by the utility factor during gas diffusion in the sensing body. Therefore, the rational design of microstructure of devices is attractive and necessary because it may provide a sensible and controllable microstructure, which facilitates gas diffusion and inhibits the utility factor. Herein, the mesoporous tin oxide (MPTD) quantum dot thin film for H2S gas sensors is prepared by a facile route, which creates a mesoporous microstructure for thin films by the thermal decomposition of NH4Cl. The pore size of the thin films is controlled to be 19.36–40.13 nm. The mesoporous microstructure exhibits enhanced gas-sensing properties amounting to a 30-fold increase in response and 1/3 reduction in recovery time in H2S detection at room temperature (25 °C), with a limit of detection of 0.4 ppm. To determine the importance of sensor parameters such as pore size, film thickness, and grain size, an eXtreme Gradient Boosting (XGBoost) algorithm model was developed to examine the feature importance of each parameter on the gas-sensing performance of the MPTD sensors. The visual illustration of parameter importance is revealed to facilitate the optimization of technical preparation parameters as well as the rational design of semiconductor gas sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Sensors Based on Low-Dimensional Semiconductors)
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13 pages, 2433 KiB  
Article
Quantum Dots-Sensitized High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) for Sensitive NO2 Detection
by Zhixiang Hu, Licheng Zhou, Long Li, Binzhou Ying, Yunong Zhao, Peng Wang, Huayao Li, Yang Zhang and Huan Liu
Chemosensors 2023, 11(4), 252; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11040252 - 18 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1444
Abstract
Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are gaining increasing attention for gas sensing applications due to their large surface area and abundant active sites. However, traditional resistor-type gas sensors using CQDs to realize molecule recognition and signal transduction at the same time are associated with [...] Read more.
Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are gaining increasing attention for gas sensing applications due to their large surface area and abundant active sites. However, traditional resistor-type gas sensors using CQDs to realize molecule recognition and signal transduction at the same time are associated with the trade-off between sensitivity and conductivity. This limitation has restricted their range of practical applications. In this study, we propose and demonstrate a monolithically integrated field-effect transistor (FET) gas sensor. This novel FET-type gas sensor utilizes the capacitance coupling effect of the CQD sensing film based on a floating gate, and the quantum capacitance plays a role in the capacitance response of the CQD sensing film. By effectively separating the gate sensing film from the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) conduction channel, the lead sulfide (PbS) CQD gate-sensitized FET gas sensor offers high sensitivity, a high signal-to-noise ratio, and a wide range, with a real-time response of sub-ppb NO2. This work highlights the potential of quantum dot-sensitized FET gas sensors as a practical solution for integrated gas sensor chip applications using CQDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Sensors Based on Low-Dimensional Semiconductors)
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13 pages, 3353 KiB  
Article
A Method of Ultra-Low Power Consumption Implementation for MEMS Gas Sensors
by Yu Bing, Fuyun Zhang, Jiatong Han, Tingting Zhou, Haixia Mei and Tong Zhang
Chemosensors 2023, 11(4), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11040236 - 10 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1726
Abstract
In recent years, there has been a growing need for the development of low-power gas sensors. This paper proposes pulse heating and a corresponding measurement strategy using a Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signal to realize the ultra-low power consumption for metal oxide semiconductor [...] Read more.
In recent years, there has been a growing need for the development of low-power gas sensors. This paper proposes pulse heating and a corresponding measurement strategy using a Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signal to realize the ultra-low power consumption for metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) gas sensors. A Micro-Hot-Plate (MHP) substrate was chosen to investigate the temperature and power characteristics of the MHP under different applied heating methods. The temperature of this given substrate could respond to the applied voltage within 0.1 s, proving the prac ticability of a pulse heating strategy. In addition, Pd-doped SnO2 was synthesized as the sensing material in the implementation of an ultra-low power gas sensor. The sensing performance and power consumption under different conditions were compared in the detection of reducing gases such as ethanol (C2H5OH) and formaldehyde (HCHO). Additionally, the results revealed that the sensor could work under PWM excitation while reducing the operating power to less than 1mW. The features shown in the measurements provide the feasibility for MOS gas sensors’ application in wearable and portable devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Sensors Based on Low-Dimensional Semiconductors)
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