10th Anniversary of Chemosensors—Section 'Materials for Chemical Sensing'

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials for Chemical Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 20012

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 1, 35131 Padova, Italy
Interests: supramolecular chemistry; stimuli-responsive materials; biomimetic/sensing materials; chemical sensors; electroanalytical chemistry; biointerfaces; nanobiotechnology
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Guest Editor
Smart Plastics Group, IRDL CNRS 6027, University of South Brittany (UBS), Lorient, France
Interests: polymer nanocomposites sensors; smart Materials; human and materials’ health monitoring; damage and desease detection; e-noses; nanoassembly layer by layer
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The year 2023 marks the 10th anniversary of the journal Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040). Since 2013, when the inaugural issue of Chemosensors was launched, we have already published more than 1200 papers from more than 5300 authors. More than 3400 reviewers have submitted at least one review report.

To mark this significant milestone, a Special Issue entitled “10th Anniversary of Chemosensors—Section 'Materials for Chemical Sensing'” is being launched. The Section “Materials for Chemical Sensing” focuses on the development of materials with novel chemical sensing ability, mechanism, and transduction principles. We have published more than 200 papers and have more than 60 Section Board Editors.

The Special Issue covers wide hot topics related to sensing materials. We would like to invite you to contribute an original research paper or a comprehensive review article on a trending or hot topic for peer review and possible publication. Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Inorganic, organic, and hybrid nanomaterials for chemical sensing
  • Two-dimensional materials for chemical sensing
  • Metal–organic frameworks for chemical sensing
  • Supramolecular systems for chemical sensing
  • Smart soft materials for chemical sensing
  • Molecularly imprinted polymers
  • DNA-based sensors
  • Thin-film-device-based sensors
  • Nanomaterials for gas sensing
  • Microfluidic sensors
  • Porous materials for chemical sensing

Dr. Marco Frasconi
Prof. Dr. Jean-Francois Feller
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 11569 KiB  
Article
Pysanka-Inspired Electrode Modification with Aptamer Encapsulation in ZIF-8 for Urine Creatinine Electrochemical Biosensing
by Antra Ganguly, Anirban Paul and Shalini Prasad
Chemosensors 2023, 11(11), 557; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11110557 - 06 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1797
Abstract
Drawing inspiration from the several thousand beautiful Pysanky egg art of Ukraine, we have developed a novel material, Aptamer–Gold Nanoparticles (AuNPs)@ZIF-8, that can be used for building sensitive and highly stable POC biosensors for longitudinal health mapping. Here, we demonstrate a sensitive and [...] Read more.
Drawing inspiration from the several thousand beautiful Pysanky egg art of Ukraine, we have developed a novel material, Aptamer–Gold Nanoparticles (AuNPs)@ZIF-8, that can be used for building sensitive and highly stable POC biosensors for longitudinal health mapping. Here, we demonstrate a sensitive and specific novel electrochemical biosensor, made of a novel synthesized in situ encapsulated aptamer-AuNPs@ZIF-8 composite, for monitoring levels of creatinine (0.1–1000 μg/mL). In this work, we have reported the synthetic protocol for the first-of-a-kind in situ encapsulation of aptamer and AuNPs together in a ZIF-8 matrix, and explored the characteristic properties of this novel material composite using standard analytical techniques and its application for biosensor application. The as-synthesized material, duly characterized using various physicochemical analytical methods, portrays the characteristics of the unique encapsulation strategy to develop the first-of-a-kind aptamer and AuNP encapsulation. Non-faradaic Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Chronoamperometry were used to characterize the interfacial electrochemical properties. The biosensor performance was first validated using artificial urine in a controlled buffer medium. The stability and robustness were tested using a real human urine medium without filtration or sample treatment. Being versatile, this Ukrainian-art-inspired biosensor can potentially move the needle towards developing the next generation of sample-in-result-out robust POC diagnostics. Full article
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17 pages, 5009 KiB  
Article
Optimization of the Geometrical Design for an All-Dielectric Metasurface Sensor with a High Refractive-Index Response
by Chia-Te Chang, Chia-Ming Yang, I-Hsuan Chen, Chih-Ching Ho, Yu-Jen Lu and Chih-Jen Yu
Chemosensors 2023, 11(9), 498; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11090498 - 11 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1176
Abstract
This study aims to develop a refractive-index sensor operating in the visible region using an all-dielectric metasurface, which was chosen for its advantages of low optical loss and narrow spectral bandwidth, compared to those of conventional metallic metasurfaces. COMSOL software was utilized as [...] Read more.
This study aims to develop a refractive-index sensor operating in the visible region using an all-dielectric metasurface, which was chosen for its advantages of low optical loss and narrow spectral bandwidth, compared to those of conventional metallic metasurfaces. COMSOL software was utilized as a calculation tool to simulate the resonant properties of an all-dielectric metasurface composed of a circular nanohole-structured titanium oxide (TiO2) thin film, with the aim of enhancing the sensitivity of the refractive index for sensing targets. The simulation focused on finding the best geometrical conditions for the all-dielectric metasurface to achieve high sensitivity. Two resonance modes observed in this metasurface were considered: the quasi-bound-state-in-the-continuum (qBIC) mode and the perfect-reflection (PR) mode. The simulated results demonstrated that high sensitivities of 257 nm/RIU at the PR mode and 94 nm/RIU at the qBIC mode in the visible spectral range could be obtained by periodically constructing the metasurface with a unit cell having a lattice constant of 350 nm, a nanohole radius of 160 nm, and a nanohole depth of 250 nm. Furthermore, the study showed that the resonance mode that enabled high sensitivity was the PR mode, with a sensitivity nearly three times larger than that of the qBIC mode and the ability to reach the highest reflectance at the resonance wavelength. The optimized feature had the highest reflectance at a resonant wavelength of 570.19 nm, and although the quality factor was 25.50, these designed parameters were considered sufficient for developing a refractive index biosensor with high sensitivity and optical efficiency when operating in the visible spectral range. Full article
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13 pages, 5546 KiB  
Communication
Pyranine Immobilized on Aminopropyl-Modified Mesoporous Silica Film for Paraquat Detection
by Sudarat Sombatsri, Krittanun Deekamwong, Pongtanawat Khemthong and Sanchai Prayoonpokarach
Chemosensors 2023, 11(4), 249; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11040249 - 17 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1552
Abstract
An optical sensor based on pyranine immobilized on aminopropyl-modified mesoporous silica films was developed for paraquat detection in aqueous solutions. An electrochemically assisted self-assembly method was used to deposit mesoporous silica film on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass. The obtained films were modified with [...] Read more.
An optical sensor based on pyranine immobilized on aminopropyl-modified mesoporous silica films was developed for paraquat detection in aqueous solutions. An electrochemically assisted self-assembly method was used to deposit mesoporous silica film on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass. The obtained films were modified with various concentrations of 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) before the immobilization of pyranine. Cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the films. Pyranine-immobilized films gave an emission at 506 nm with an excitation at 450 nm. The fluorescence signal was quenched in the presence of paraquat. The films modified with 3% APTES provided the optimum response to paraquat. The developed films had a linear response to paraquat in the concentration range of 1 to 10 ppm at the optimum conditions, with a detection limit of 0.80 ppm. The developed method was used to quantify paraquat in sugarcane peel and tap water samples with satisfactory results. Full article
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10 pages, 4146 KiB  
Communication
A Broad Spectral Photodetector Using Organic Bisindolo Quinoxaline on ZnO Nanorods
by Ming-Hsien Li, Yao-Hong Huang, Chi-Chih Chuang, Sang-Hao Lin, Yi-Hsuan Huang, Chia-Feng Lin, Yung-Sen Lin, Ming-Yu Kuo and Hsiang Chen
Chemosensors 2023, 11(3), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11030199 - 20 Mar 2023
Viewed by 978
Abstract
Inorganic/organic hybrids of ZnO nanorods (NRs)/bisindolo quinoxaline (BIQ) were fabricated for broadband photosensing applications. Multiple material characterizations revealed the BIQ was self-assembled in a regular form of rod-like domain and an irregular form of amorphous aggregation that were distributed on the ZnO NRs. [...] Read more.
Inorganic/organic hybrids of ZnO nanorods (NRs)/bisindolo quinoxaline (BIQ) were fabricated for broadband photosensing applications. Multiple material characterizations revealed the BIQ was self-assembled in a regular form of rod-like domain and an irregular form of amorphous aggregation that were distributed on the ZnO NRs. Optical measurements showed that BIQ can absorb visible light with a wavelength up to 630 nm and effectively generate photoelectrons. Moreover, clustering of BIQ can be observed via the 3D optical microscopy. ZnO/BIQ hybrids were promising for future UV and visible light environmental monitoring applications. Full article
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11 pages, 3265 KiB  
Article
Carbon Dot-Functionalized Solution-Gated Graphene Transistors for Highly Sensitive Detection of Cobalt(II) Ions
by Zhanpeng Ren, Jianying Wang, Chenglong Xue, Minghua Deng, Ziqin Li, Huibin Zhang, Chen Cai, Bing Xu, Xianbao Wang and Jinhua Li
Chemosensors 2023, 11(3), 192; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11030192 - 15 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1143
Abstract
A carbon dot-functionalized solution-gated graphene transistor (CD-SGGT) was designed and prepared via the modification of CDs on the gate of SGGT. The above CDs were hydrothermally synthesized using DL-thioctic acid and triethylenetramine as C, N and S sources. The average size of CDs [...] Read more.
A carbon dot-functionalized solution-gated graphene transistor (CD-SGGT) was designed and prepared via the modification of CDs on the gate of SGGT. The above CDs were hydrothermally synthesized using DL-thioctic acid and triethylenetramine as C, N and S sources. The average size of CDs was ~6.2 nm, and there were many amino and carboxyl groups on the CDs’ surfaces. The CDs was then used as a probe for preparation of CD-SGGT sensor for the cobalt(II) (Co2+) ions detection. The CD-SGGT sensor showed excellent sensitivity and high selectivity. Remarkably, the limit of detection (LOD) reached 10−19 M. The linear detection range was obtained from 10−19 to 10−15 M. Additionally, the CD-SGGT also showed fast response and good stability. Full article
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12 pages, 2169 KiB  
Article
Aggregation-Induced Emission-Active Iridium(III) Complexes for Sensing Picric Acid in Water
by Ping He, Yan Chen, Xiao-Na Li, Ying-Ying Yan and Chun Liu
Chemosensors 2023, 11(3), 177; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11030177 - 06 Mar 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1489
Abstract
Herein, two new iridium(III) complexes, namely Ir2 and Ir3, with a phenyl or triphenylamine (TPA) moiety at the 4-position of the phenyl ring at 2-phenylbenzothiazole, have been synthesized, and their emission properties have been studied systematically compared with the non-substituted complex Ir1 [...] Read more.
Herein, two new iridium(III) complexes, namely Ir2 and Ir3, with a phenyl or triphenylamine (TPA) moiety at the 4-position of the phenyl ring at 2-phenylbenzothiazole, have been synthesized, and their emission properties have been studied systematically compared with the non-substituted complex Ir1. These three complexes exhibit aggregation-induced emission (AIE) in H2O/CH3CN. The TPA-substituted complex Ir3 shows the highest AIE activity. All complexes can be used as sensors to detect picric acid (PA) in water. The Stern–Volmer constant (KSV) of Ir3 for the detection of PA was determined to be 1.96 × 106 M−1, with a low limit of detection of 2.52 nM. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis, and density function theory calculations confirm that the emission quenching mechanism of Ir3 is caused by photo-induced electron transfer. Furthermore, the efficient detection of PA in natural water proves that Ir1Ir3 can be used as promising sensors in the natural environment. These results suggest that the AIE-active iridium(III) complexes can be used to detect PA under environment-friendly conditions. Full article
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14 pages, 5608 KiB  
Article
PEDOT:PSS/PEDOT Film Chemiresistive Sensors for Hydrogen Peroxide Vapor Detection under Ambient Conditions
by Xiaowen Xie, Nan Gao, Ling Zhu, Matthew Hunter, Shuai Chen and Ling Zang
Chemosensors 2023, 11(2), 124; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11020124 - 07 Feb 2023
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1809
Abstract
Hydrogen peroxide (aqueous solution of H2O2) is one of the most used reagents i n medical sterilization, environmental disinfection, food storage, and other fields. However, hydrogen peroxide has the potential to cause serious harm to biological health and environmental [...] Read more.
Hydrogen peroxide (aqueous solution of H2O2) is one of the most used reagents i n medical sterilization, environmental disinfection, food storage, and other fields. However, hydrogen peroxide has the potential to cause serious harm to biological health and environmental safety. There are many methods (especially electrochemistry) for H2O2 detection in liquid phase systems, but a lack of methods for vapor detection. This is due to its colorless and tasteless nature, as well as the oxidative activity of the molecule and its coexistence with humidity. In this study, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS), one of the most commercially successful and widely used conductive polymers, was employed to fabricate an all-organic chemiresistive sensor for simple, real-time, and on-site sensing of hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV) at room temperature. In comparison with pristine PEDOT:PSS film, the PEDOT:PSS/PEDOT film was prepared by in situ electrochemical polymerization. Upon exposure to different concentrations of HPV, it was found that the hydrophobic and porous PEDOT layer could weaken the interference of humidity in HPV sensing, resulting in a more sensitive and accurate response. At 1.0 ppm HPV concentration, the resistance signal response was increased by nearly 89% compared with the pristine PEDOT:PSS film. This PEDOT-film-based chemiresistive sensor showcases the possibility for further development of nonenzymatic HPV monitoring technology. Full article
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19 pages, 4270 KiB  
Article
Nanogel for Selective Recognition of Nanoparticles in Water Samples
by Yong Ying Tay, Xuan Hao Lin and Sam Fong Yau Li
Chemosensors 2023, 11(1), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11010072 - 16 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1832
Abstract
Nanoparticles (NPs) represent emerging pollutants that still pose analytical challenges for their detection in environmentally relevant samples due to their extremely low concentrations, high colloidal background, and the need to perform speciation analysis. They are also one of the interfering matrices during the [...] Read more.
Nanoparticles (NPs) represent emerging pollutants that still pose analytical challenges for their detection in environmentally relevant samples due to their extremely low concentrations, high colloidal background, and the need to perform speciation analysis. They are also one of the interfering matrices during the analysis of metal ions and contaminants in water samples. Currently, conventional analytical techniques such as Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) are used for the detection of NPs, but such techniques require bulky instrumentation and are difficult to be automated for online analysis. In this study, we aim to develop a nanoparticle-imprinted hydrogel (NPIH, NANOGEL) to detect and capture NPs in water samples. The principle of the Nanogel originates from the well-known concept of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). Cadmium sulfide/Selenide/Zinc sulfide core/shell quantum dots (QDs) were used as the template NP, creating specific pore cavities in the Nanogel that can selectively bind to certain analytes. Quantification of NPs detected in water samples was then made possible by transducing this selective detection process into an analytical signal using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The Nanogel was shown to demonstrate good repeatability, reproducibility, and stability in terms of its performance. The high selectivity of the Nanogel was determined to be attributed to the size of cavities and their surface characteristics. Ionic interference was present and, heavy metal cations showed an affinity for the NANOGEL synthesized; however, they were demonstrated to be minimized by the selection of porogenic solvents during the synthesis of NANOGEL. We believe that the Nanogel would provide a highly selective and sensitive approach for the detection of NPs in aqueous samples and the removal of NPs from contaminated water resources. It will serve useful in environmental applications. Full article
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Review

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49 pages, 11990 KiB  
Review
Conventional Raman, SERS and TERS Studies of DNA Compounds
by Wafa Safar, Aicha Azziz, Mathieu Edely and Marc Lamy de la Chapelle
Chemosensors 2023, 11(7), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11070399 - 16 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1895
Abstract
DNA identification is possible by detecting its components through vibrational spectroscopy. Conventional Raman, Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) have shown a high capacity for the exploration of different molecules and materials (semi-conducting material, carbon nanotubes and biologicals molecules as [...] Read more.
DNA identification is possible by detecting its components through vibrational spectroscopy. Conventional Raman, Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) have shown a high capacity for the exploration of different molecules and materials (semi-conducting material, carbon nanotubes and biologicals molecules as DNA, proteins). Their applications extended to biological systems and brought significant information to this field. This review summarizes a high number of studies and research conducted with conventional Raman, SERS and TERS on every DNA component starting from the four different nucleic acids in their different forms (nucleosides, deoxyribonucleosides, deoxyribonucleotides) to their biological interaction to form one and double DNA strands. As SERS has an advantage on conventional Raman by exploiting the optical properties of metallic nanostructures to detect very small quantities of molecules, it also clarifies the DNA structure’s orientation in addition to its composition. It also clarifies the influence of different parameters, such as the presence of a spacer or a mutation in the strand on the hybridization process. TERS was shown as a relevant tool to scan DNA chemically and to provide information on its sequence. Full article
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34 pages, 4970 KiB  
Review
Cellulose-Based Functional Materials for Sensing
by Valeria Gabrielli and Marco Frasconi
Chemosensors 2022, 10(9), 352; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors10090352 - 26 Aug 2022
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 4984
Abstract
The growing bioeconomic demand for lightweight materials with combined sustainability, large-scale production, ease in functionalization and competitive mechanical properties has seen the revival of cellulose as a scaffold for several applications. In particular, due to its multifunctional features, cellulose has found application in [...] Read more.
The growing bioeconomic demand for lightweight materials with combined sustainability, large-scale production, ease in functionalization and competitive mechanical properties has seen the revival of cellulose as a scaffold for several applications. In particular, due to its multifunctional features, cellulose has found application in sensor and biosensor fabrication. Nonetheless, the great variety of cellulose properties and formulations makes the choice of the best suited cellulose-based material for a specific sensing strategy a difficult task. This review offers a critical discussion and guide for the reader towards the understanding of which of the multiple cellulose derivatives and properties can be exploited for the optimal performance of the desired sensing device. We introduce the unique molecular structure, nanoarchitecture and main properties of cellulose and its derivatives. The different functionalization approaches for anchoring receptors on cellulose derivatives and the processing methodologies for fabricating cellulose-based sensors are explored. As far as the use and performance of cellulose-based functional materials in sensors is concerned, we discuss the recent advances of optical and electrochemical sensors and biosensors for biomedical and environmental monitoring. Full article
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