Hurdles in Stem Cell Transplantation

A topical collection in Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This collection belongs to the section "Stem Cells".

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Editor


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Guest Editor
Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, School of Medicine, University of Colorado- Anschutz Medical Campus, CO 80045, USA
Interests: human pluripotent stem cells; direct differentiation; pancreas; thymus; insulin producing beta cells; autoimmune diabetes; genome editing; genetic lineage tracing

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last few years, regenerative medicine approaches employing stem cells and the cells derived from them have witnessed tremendous progress. Indeed, many preliminary safety and efficacy trials aiming to develop innovative treatment options for a variety of diseases are currently ongoing, demonstrating the excellent prospects of this translational research field. However, despite these rapid advances, many distinct challenges involved in the transplantation of stem cell products remain to be comprehensively addressed. These challenges include, but are not limited to, the reproducible production of specific cell types, tissue organoids and cell therapy products, as well as the effective delivery of stem-cell-derived transplants, immediate and long-term graft survival and challenges of an immunological nature. For this collection, entitled “Hurdles in Stem Cell Transplantation”, we welcome original research contributions that focus on solutions to the obstacles defined above, as well as other challenges in the field of regenerative medicine.

Dr. Holger Russ
Guest Editor

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Published Papers (1 paper)

2023

19 pages, 905 KiB  
Review
Cell Replacement Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes Patients: Potential Mechanisms Leading to Stem-Cell-Derived Pancreatic β-Cell Loss upon Transplant
by Ali H. Shilleh and Holger A. Russ
Cells 2023, 12(5), 698; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells12050698 - 22 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3602
Abstract
Cell replacement therapy using stem-cell-derived insulin-producing β-like cells (sBCs) has been proposed as a practical cure for patients with type one diabetes (T1D). sBCs can correct diabetes in preclinical animal models, demonstrating the promise of this stem cell-based approach. However, in vivo studies [...] Read more.
Cell replacement therapy using stem-cell-derived insulin-producing β-like cells (sBCs) has been proposed as a practical cure for patients with type one diabetes (T1D). sBCs can correct diabetes in preclinical animal models, demonstrating the promise of this stem cell-based approach. However, in vivo studies have demonstrated that most sBCs, similarly to cadaveric human islets, are lost upon transplantation due to ischemia and other unknown mechanisms. Hence, there is a critical knowledge gap in the current field concerning the fate of sBCs upon engraftment. Here we review, discuss effects, and propose additional potential mechanisms that could contribute toward β-cell loss in vivo. We summarize and highlight some of the literature on phenotypic loss in β-cells under both steady, stressed, and diseased diabetic conditions. Specifically, we focus on β-cell death, dedifferentiation into progenitors, trans-differentiation into other hormone-expressing cells, and/or interconversion into less functional β-cell subtypes as potential mechanisms. While current cell replacement therapy efforts employing sBCs carry great promise as an abundant cell source, addressing the somewhat neglected aspect of β-cell loss in vivo will further accelerate sBC transplantation as a promising therapeutic modality that could significantly enhance the life quality of T1D patients. Full article
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