New Insights into Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ADSCs)

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Stem Cells".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2024 | Viewed by 4110

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria delle Marche, 60126 Ancona, Italy
Interests: adipose stem cells; regenerative medicine; smart biomaterials; osteoarthritis; novel technologies; exosomes
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Guest Editor
School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA
Interests: stem cells; tissue engineering; extracellular vesicles; biomaterials; cryopreservation; clinical translation

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Guest Editor
School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA
Interests: stem cells; tissue engineering; extracellular vesicles; biomaterials; immunology; ageing; extracellular matrix

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) hold promise for a myriad of regenerative medicine applications. Isolated from ubiquitous and clinically accessible adipose tissue reservoirs, ASCs exhibit the capacity for multipotent differentiation into adipocyte, chondrocyte, and osteocyte lineages. Notably, ASCs possess distinctive immunomodulatory properties, underscoring their potential for use in treating autoimmune disorders as well as coordinating the immune response to foster tissue repair. Recent investigations have unveiled their intricate paracrine signaling mechanisms and their role in angiogenesis, implicating ASCs to be key orchestrators of regenerative processes.

This Special Issue aims to unravel the latest discoveries and advancements in the field of adipose-derived stem cells, including original research articles and comprehensive reviews that explore the molecular mechanisms governing adipogenic differentiation, immunomodulatory properties, paracrine signaling, and their clinical implications. With a focus on bridging the gap between fundamental research and clinical translation, this Special Issue also offers a platform with which to showcase emerging therapeutics utilizing ASCs, including ASC-based cell therapies, ASC-derived exosomes, and ASC-based tissue-engineered constructs, as well as efforts focused on streamlining the manufacturing and implementation of these therapeutics.

Dr. Francesco De Francesco
Dr. Arthi Shridhar
Dr. William D’Angelo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • adipose-derived stem cells
  • immunomodulation
  • exosomes
  • cell therapy
  • clinical translation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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18 pages, 3943 KiB  
Article
Transcriptional Control of Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue by the Transcription Factor CTCF Modulates Heterogeneity in Fat Distribution in Women
by Edina Erdos, Katalin Sandor, Crystal L. Young-Erdos, Laszlo Halasz, Steven R. Smith, Timothy F. Osborne and Adeline Divoux
Cells 2024, 13(1), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells13010086 - 30 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Determining the mechanism driving body fat distribution will provide insights into obesity-related health risks. We used functional genomics tools to profile the epigenomic landscape to help infer the differential transcriptional potential of apple- and pear-shaped women’s subcutaneous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). We found [...] Read more.
Determining the mechanism driving body fat distribution will provide insights into obesity-related health risks. We used functional genomics tools to profile the epigenomic landscape to help infer the differential transcriptional potential of apple- and pear-shaped women’s subcutaneous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). We found that CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) expression and its chromatin binding were increased in ADSCs from pear donors compared to those from apple donors. Interestingly, the pear enriched CTCF binding sites were located predominantly at the active transcription start sites (TSSs) of genes with active histone marks and YY1 motifs and were also associated with pear enriched RNAPII binding. In contrast, apple enriched CTCF binding sites were mainly found at intergenic regions and when identified at TSS, they were enriched with the bivalent chromatin signatures. Altogether, we provide evidence that CTCF plays an important role in differential regulation of subcutaneous ADSCs gene expression and may influence the development of apple vs. pear body shape. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ADSCs))
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13 pages, 2199 KiB  
Commentary
The Evolution of Current Concept of the Reconstructive Ladder in Plastic Surgery: The Emerging Role of Translational Medicine
by Francesco De Francesco, Nicola Zingaretti, Pier Camillo Parodi and Michele Riccio
Cells 2023, 12(21), 2567; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells12212567 - 3 Nov 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2295
Abstract
Plastic surgeons have used the reconstructive ladder for many decades as a standard directory for complex trauma reconstruction with the goal of repairing body structures and restoring functionality. This consists of different surgical maneuvers, such as secondary intention and direct tissue closure, as [...] Read more.
Plastic surgeons have used the reconstructive ladder for many decades as a standard directory for complex trauma reconstruction with the goal of repairing body structures and restoring functionality. This consists of different surgical maneuvers, such as secondary intention and direct tissue closure, as well as more complex methods such as local tissue transfer and free flap. The reconstructive ladder represents widely known options achievable for tissue reconstruction and wound closure that puts at the bottom rung the simplest methods of reconstruction and strengthens the complexity by moving upward. Regenerative medicine and surgery constitute a quickly spreading area of translational research that can be employed by minimally invasive surgical strategies, with the aim of regenerating cells and tissues in vivo in order to reestablish normal function through the intrinsic potential of cells, in combination with biomaterials and appropriate biochemical stimuli. These translational procedures have the aim of creating an appropriate microenvironment capable of supporting the physiological cellular function to generate the desired cells or tissues and to generate parenchymal, stromal, and vascular components on demand, and above all to produce intelligent materials capable of determining the fate of cells. Smart technologies have been grown that give extra “rungs” on the classic reconstructive ladder to integrate a more holistic, patient-based approach with improved outcomes. This commentary presents the evolution of the traditional concept of the reconstructive ladder in the field of plastic surgery into a new course with the aim of achieving excellent results for soft tissue reconstruction by applying innovative technologies and biologically active molecules for a wide range of surgical diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ADSCs))
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