Adenosine and Adenosine Receptors in Human Disease

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2023) | Viewed by 1150

Special Issue Editor

1. Laboratory of Biochemistry, Timone University Hospital, APHM, 13005 Marseille, France
2. Center for CardioVascular and Nutrition Research (C2VN), INSERM, INRAE, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France
Interests: adenosinergic system; cardiovascular diseases; cardiac arrythmia; cell signaling transduction
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the identification of adenosine in 1929 and the concept of extracellular purinergic signaling being introduced in 1972, adenosine and its four G-protein-coupled receptors have been extensively studied, and there is a growing understanding of the involvement of the adenosinergic system in human diseases. Due to the wide distribution of the adenosine receptors throughout the human body, adenosine has emerged as an important signaling molecule with major and pleiotropic effects in the cardiovascular, central nervous and immune systems. Since adenosine is increased by hypoxia, ischemia or inflammation, improved knowledge of adenosinergic system signaling in human diseases could offer new opportunities in prognosis, diagnosis or therapeutic strategies for cardiovascular diseases, cancer, neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders.

The aim of this Special Issue of Cells, entitled “Adenosine and Adenosine Receptors in Human Disease”, is to provide an overview of the state of the art and to promote new insights into adenosine and adenosine receptors’ involvement in cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders. Both original research and review articles consistent with this research topic will be considered for publication.

We look forward to your contributions.

Dr. Julien Fromonot
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • adenosine
  • adenosine receptors
  • cardiovascular diseases
  • cancer
  • neurodegenerative disorders
  • metabolic disorders
  • hypoxia
  • inflammation
  • ischemia
  • immune system

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

13 pages, 8233 KiB  
Review
Adenosinergic System and Neuroendocrine Syncope: What Is the Link?
Cells 2023, 12(16), 2027; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells12162027 - 08 Aug 2023
Viewed by 885
Abstract
Although very common, the precise mechanisms that explain the symptomatology of neuroendocrine syncope (NES) remain poorly understood. This disease, which can be very incapacitating, manifests itself as a drop in blood pressure secondary to vasodilation and/or extreme slowing of heart rate. As studies [...] Read more.
Although very common, the precise mechanisms that explain the symptomatology of neuroendocrine syncope (NES) remain poorly understood. This disease, which can be very incapacitating, manifests itself as a drop in blood pressure secondary to vasodilation and/or extreme slowing of heart rate. As studies continue, the involvement of the adenosinergic system is becoming increasingly evident. Adenosine, which is an ATP derivative, may be involved in a large number of cases. Adenosine acts on G protein-coupled receptors with seven transmembrane domains. A1 and A2A adenosine receptor dysfunction seem to be particularly implicated since the activation leads to severe bradycardia or vasodilation, respectively, two cardinal symptoms of NES. This mini-review aims to shed light on the links between dysfunction of the adenosinergic system and NHS. In particular, signal transduction pathways through the modulation of cAMP production and ion channels in relation to effects on the cardiovascular system are addressed. A better understanding of these mechanisms could guide the pharmacological development of new therapeutic approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adenosine and Adenosine Receptors in Human Disease)
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