Tumor Immune Microenvironment for Effective Therapy II

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Cellular Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2855

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27834, USA
Interests: cancer biology; tumor microenvironment; inflammation; vascular biology; acidosis; pH sensing; G protein-coupled receptor; signal transduction
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Immunotherapy has changed the paradigm of cancer treatment and significantly improved clinical outcomes in a subset of cancer patients. However, the responses to immunotherapy and the therapeutic outcomes vary among cancer patients. Research demonstrates that the tumor microenvironment plays an important role in cancer immunotherapy. There are a variety of cell types, including cancer cells, T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts, and vascular cells, in the tumor microenvironment. Some of these cell types contribute to the immunosuppressive microenvironment in a tumor. Additionally, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and the extracellular matrix in the tumor microenvironment modulate immune cell functions and antitumor immunity. Moreover, the unique biochemical characteristics of the tumor microenvironment, such as hypoxia, acidosis, accumulation of lactate and adenosine, and nutrient deprivation, can be immune suppressive. A better understanding of the tumor immune microenvironment will be advantageous for developing effective cancer immunotherapy.

This Special Issue will cover research topics on tumor immune microenvironment and the implications in cancer immunotherapy, as indicated by, but not limited to, the keywords below. Original research papers, review articles, theories, and commentaries are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Li Yang
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • tumor microenvironment
  • cancer immunotherapy
  • immune checkpoints
  • immune cells
  • cancer-associated fibroblasts
  • vascular cells
  • inflammation
  • hypoxia
  • acidosis
  • cytokines

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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30 pages, 5293 KiB  
Article
Contemporaneous Perioperative Inflammatory and Angiogenic Cytokine Profiles of Surgical Breast, Colorectal, and Prostate Cancer Patients: Clinical Implications
by Leili Baghaie, Fiona Haxho, Fleur Leroy, Beth Lewis, Alexander Wawer, Shamano Minhas, William W. Harless and Myron R. Szewczuk
Cells 2023, 12(23), 2767; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells12232767 - 4 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Surgery-induced tumor growth acceleration and synchronous metastatic growth promotion have been observed for decades. Surgery-induced wound healing, orchestrated through growth factors, chemokines, and cytokines, can negatively impact patients harboring residual or metastatic disease. We provide detailed clinical evidence of this process in surgical [...] Read more.
Surgery-induced tumor growth acceleration and synchronous metastatic growth promotion have been observed for decades. Surgery-induced wound healing, orchestrated through growth factors, chemokines, and cytokines, can negatively impact patients harboring residual or metastatic disease. We provide detailed clinical evidence of this process in surgical breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer patients. Plasma samples were analyzed from 68 cancer patients who had not received treatment before surgery or adjuvant therapy until at least four weeks post-surgery. The levels of plasma cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors were simultaneously quantified and profiled using multiplexed immunoassays for eight time points sampled per patient. The immunologic processes are induced immediately after surgery in patients, characterized by a drastic short-term shift in the expression levels of pro-inflammatory and angiogenic molecules and cytokines. A rapid and significant spike in circulating plasma levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), placental growth factor (PLGF), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) after surgery was noted. The rise in these molecules was concomitant with a significant drop in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AB/BB), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-2 (MCP-2). If not earlier, each plasma analyte was normalized to baseline levels within 1–2 weeks after surgery, suggesting that surgical intervention alone was responsible for these effects. The effects of surgical tumor removal on disrupting the pro-inflammatory and angiogenic plasma profiles of cancer patients provide evidence for potentiating malignant progression. Our findings indicate a narrow therapeutic window of opportunity after surgery to prevent disease recurrence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tumor Immune Microenvironment for Effective Therapy II)
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17 pages, 739 KiB  
Review
Interleukin-21 Influences Glioblastoma Course: Biological Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential
by Alberto Repici, Alessio Ardizzone, Alessia Filippone, Cristina Colarossi, Marzia Mare, Gabriele Raciti, Deborah Mannino, Salvatore Cuzzocrea, Irene Paterniti and Emanuela Esposito
Cells 2023, 12(18), 2284; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells12182284 - 15 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1327
Abstract
Brain tumors represent a heterogeneous group of neoplasms involving the brain or nearby tissues, affecting populations of all ages with a high incidence worldwide. Among the primary brain tumors, the most aggressive and also the most common is glioblastoma (GB), a type of [...] Read more.
Brain tumors represent a heterogeneous group of neoplasms involving the brain or nearby tissues, affecting populations of all ages with a high incidence worldwide. Among the primary brain tumors, the most aggressive and also the most common is glioblastoma (GB), a type of glioma that falls into the category of IV-grade astrocytoma. GB often leads to death within a few months after diagnosis, even if the patient is treated with available therapies; for this reason, it is important to continue to discover new therapeutic approaches to allow for a better survival rate of these patients. Immunotherapy, today, seems to be one of the most innovative types of treatment, based on the ability of the immune system to counteract various pathologies, including cancer. In this context, interleukin 21 (IL-21), a type I cytokine produced by natural killer (NK) cells and CD4+ T lymphocytes, appears to be a valid target for new therapies since this cytokine is involved in the activation of innate and adaptive immunity. To match this purpose, our review deeply evaluated how IL-21 could influence the progression of GB, analyzing its main biological processes and mechanisms while evaluating the potential use of the latest available therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tumor Immune Microenvironment for Effective Therapy II)
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