Towards the Transition Metal Catalysis in Organic Synthesis

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Catalytic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 13851

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Università dell’Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como, Italy
Interests: methodologies for the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds by transition metal-catalyzed reactions; C–H functionalization processes involving unactivated carbon–carbon multiple bonds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DeFENS, Department of Food, Environmental and Nutritional Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: transition metal catalyzed reactions; synthetic methodologies to obtain bioactive molecules
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Transition metal catalyzed reactions have become powerful tools in organic synthesis because allow the formation of carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds in mild and sustainable conditions. The synthetic methodologies that are part of the homogeneous catalysis have a considerable interest also from the applicative point of view, as they facilitate access to organic compounds useful in medicinal chemistry and for the production of new materials with high chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivity.

The broad scope of this Special Issue would include works focused on the development of new synthetic methodologies based on the use of transition metal catalysts and on the preparation of transition metal complexes more performing in the catalysis of organic reactions. In addition, synthetic protocols of industrial interest as well as theoretical studies aimed at shedding light on the mechanism of action of the catalysts are welcome

Prof. Dr. Broggini Gianluigi
Dr. Michail Christodoulou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Transition metals
  • Homogeneous catalysis
  • Organic Synthesis
  • Asymmetric reactions
  • Reaction mechanism

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

9 pages, 1569 KiB  
Communication
Alkene Epoxidations Mediated by Mn-Salen Macrocyclic Catalysts
by Andrea Pappalardo, Francesco P. Ballistreri, Rosa Maria Toscano, Maria Assunta Chiacchio, Laura Legnani, Giovanni Grazioso, Lucia Veltri and Giuseppe Trusso Sfrazzetto
Catalysts 2021, 11(4), 465; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11040465 - 02 Apr 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2777
Abstract
Three new chiral Mn macrocycle catalysts containing 20 or 40 atoms in the macrocycle were synthetized and tested in the enantioselective epoxidation of cis-β-ethyl-styrene and 1,2-dihydronathalene. The effect of the presence of a binaphtol (BINOL) compound in the catalyst backbone has been evaluated, [...] Read more.
Three new chiral Mn macrocycle catalysts containing 20 or 40 atoms in the macrocycle were synthetized and tested in the enantioselective epoxidation of cis-β-ethyl-styrene and 1,2-dihydronathalene. The effect of the presence of a binaphtol (BINOL) compound in the catalyst backbone has been evaluated, including by Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards the Transition Metal Catalysis in Organic Synthesis)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

15 pages, 2894 KiB  
Article
Selective Oxofunctionalization of Cyclohexene over Titanium Dioxide-Based and Bismuth Oxyhalide Photocatalysts by Visible Light Irradiation
by Adolfo Henríquez, Héctor D. Mansilla, Azael Martínez-de la Cruz, Lorena Cornejo-Ponce, Eduardo Schott and David Contreras
Catalysts 2020, 10(12), 1448; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10121448 - 10 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2415
Abstract
Photocatalysis driven under visible light allows us to carry out hydrocarbon oxofunctionalization under ambient conditions, using molecular oxygen as a sacrificial reagent, with the absence of hazardous subproducts and the potential use of the Sun as a clean and low-cost source of light. [...] Read more.
Photocatalysis driven under visible light allows us to carry out hydrocarbon oxofunctionalization under ambient conditions, using molecular oxygen as a sacrificial reagent, with the absence of hazardous subproducts and the potential use of the Sun as a clean and low-cost source of light. In this work, eight materials—five based on titanium dioxide and three based on bismuth oxyhalides—were used as photocatalysts in the selective oxofunctionalization of cyclohexene. The cyclohexane oxofunctionalization reactions were performed inside of a homemade photoreactor equipped with a 400 W metal halide lamp and injected air as a source of molecular oxygen. In all assayed systems, the main oxygenated products, identified by mass spectrometry, were 1,2-epoxycyclohexane, 2-cyclohexen-1-ol, and 2-cyclohexen-1-one. Titanium dioxide-based materials exhibited higher selectivities for 1,2-epoxycyclohexane than bismuth oxyhalide-based materials. In addition to this, titanium dioxide doped with iron exhibited the best selectivity for 1,2-epoxycyclohexane, demonstrating that iron plays a relevant role in the cyclohexene epoxidation process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards the Transition Metal Catalysis in Organic Synthesis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 607 KiB  
Communication
Oxidative Hydroxylation of Aryl Boronic Acid Catalyzed by Co-porphyrin Complexes via Blue-Light Irradiation
by Alaa A. Atia and Masanari Kimura
Catalysts 2020, 10(11), 1262; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10111262 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2859
Abstract
Oxidative reactions often require unstable and environmentally harmful oxidants; therefore, the investigation of safer alternatives is urgent. Here, the hydroxylation of aryl boronic acid in the presence of Co-complexes is demonstrated. Tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl) Co(II)-porphyrin was combined with biodegradable polymers such as chitosan catalyzed hydroxylation [...] Read more.
Oxidative reactions often require unstable and environmentally harmful oxidants; therefore, the investigation of safer alternatives is urgent. Here, the hydroxylation of aryl boronic acid in the presence of Co-complexes is demonstrated. Tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl) Co(II)-porphyrin was combined with biodegradable polymers such as chitosan catalyzed hydroxylation of phenyl boronic acids to form phenol derivatives under blue-light irradiation. This catalytic system can be used as an eco-friendly oxidation process that does not release oxidizing agents into the atmosphere. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards the Transition Metal Catalysis in Organic Synthesis)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

11 pages, 4085 KiB  
Review
Iridium- and Palladium-Based Catalysts in the Pharmaceutical Industry
by Óscar López and José M. Padrón
Catalysts 2022, 12(2), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12020164 - 28 Jan 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4760
Abstract
Transition metal catalysts play a vital role in a wide range of industrial organic processes. The large-scale production of chemicals relying on catalyzed organic reactions represents a sustainable approach to supply society with end products for many daily life applications. Homogeneous (mainly for [...] Read more.
Transition metal catalysts play a vital role in a wide range of industrial organic processes. The large-scale production of chemicals relying on catalyzed organic reactions represents a sustainable approach to supply society with end products for many daily life applications. Homogeneous (mainly for academic uses) and heterogeneous (crucial in industrial processes) metal-based catalysts have been developed for a plethora of organic reactions. The search for more sustainable strategies has led to the development of a countless number of metal-supported catalysts, nanosystems, and electrochemical and photochemical catalysts. In this work, although a vast number of transition metals can be used in this context, special attention is devoted to Ir- and Pd-based catalysts in the industrial manufacture of pharmaceutical drugs. Pd is by far the most widely used and versatile catalyst not only in academia but also in industry. Moreover, Ir-based complexes have emerged as attractive catalysts, particularly in asymmetric hydrogenation reactions. Ir- and Pd-based asymmetric reductions, aminations, cross-coupling reactions, and C–H activation are covered herein in the production of biologically active compounds or precursors; adaptation to bulk conditions is particularly highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards the Transition Metal Catalysis in Organic Synthesis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop