Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 36166

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Chemical, Paper, and Biomedical Engineering Department, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
Interests: catalysis and reaction engineering; natural gas conversion; oxidative dehydrogenation of light hydrocarbons; millisecond contact time reactors; nanoparticle catalysts; biomass conversion
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Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University (TMU), 1-1 Minami Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan
Interests: homogeneous catalysis; organometallics; catalysis and fine chemicals; precise olefin polymerization
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Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytech Str, Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens, Greece
Interests: biocatalysis; industrial biotechnology; lignocellulose degrading enzymes; novel enzymes; structure-function relationship
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CNR-ITAE Institute for Advanced Energy Technologies “N. Giordano”, Via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse 5, 98126 Messina, Italy
Interests: polymer electrolyte fuel cells; direct alcohol fuel cells; water electrolysis; metal–air batteries; dye-sensitized solar cells; photo-electrolysis; carbon dioxide electro-reduction
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Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Alabama, Box 870203, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA
Interests: computational catalysis; DFT calculations; kinetic Monte Carlo simulations; electrocatalysis; adsorption; porous materials; interfacial catalysis; nanoparticle synthesis; polymeric membranes; separations
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Institute of Nanostructured Materials, Palermo Research Division, CNR - ISMN, Via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo, Italy
Interests: heterogeneous catalysts for CO2 valorization; dry and steam reforming of methane; autothermal reactions; thermal and photothermal activation; H2 purification; WGS reaction and PROX; CO2 hydrogenation; methanation reaction; CO2 electrochemical reduction; SOECs; SOFCs; catalytic devices for VOCs abatement (indoor and outdoor); CO and CH2 oxidation; NO SCR by NH3, HC, EtOH; antifouling and bactericidal activity of green materials
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Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, Université Lille, Faculté des Sciences et Technologies, UMR CNRS 8181, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; environmental catalysis; VOC catalytic oxidation; plasma-catalysis; transition metal oxides; material surface characterization
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Laboratory of Alternative Fuels & Environmental Catalysis (LAFEC), Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Western Macedonia, Active Urban Planning Zone (ZEP), GR-50100 Kozani, Greece
Interests: heterogenous catalysis; biomass utilization; bio-oil; biogas; glycerol; hydrogen; syngas; renewable diesel; reforming; selective deoxygenation; CO2 hydrogenation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Catalysts is dedicated to recent advances in the research areas of catalysts and catalyzed reactions and comprises a diverse selection of exclusive papers by the Editorial Board Members (EBMs). It focuses on highlighting recent interesting investigations conducted in the laboratories of our section’s EBMs and represents our journal as an attractive open-access publishing platform for research data on catalysts and catalyzed reactions.

Prof. Dr. Keith Hohn
Prof. Dr. Kotohiro Nomura
Dr. Evangelos Topakas
Dr. Vincenzo Baglio
Prof. Dr. C. Heath Turner
Dr. Leonarda Francesca Liotta
Prof. Dr. Jean-François Lamonier
Prof. Dr. Maria A. Goula
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • photocatalysis
  • electrocatalysis
  • environmental catalysis
  • biocatalysis
  • whole cell biocatalysis
  • enzyme biocatalysis
  • catalysis for biomass conversion
  • catalysis in organic and polymer chemistry
  • nanostructured catalysts
  • catalytic materials
  • computational catalysis
  • kinetics of catalytic reactions
  • catalysis for sustainable energy

Published Papers (18 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 165 KiB  
Editorial
The Merit and the Context of Hydrogen Production from Water and Its Effect on Global CO2 Emission
by Hicham Idriss
Catalysts 2022, 12(2), 231; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12020231 - 18 Feb 2022
Viewed by 1702
Abstract
For a green economy to be possible in the near future, hydrogen production from water is a sought-after alternative to fossil fuels [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)

Research

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10 pages, 3369 KiB  
Communication
Depolymerization of Polyesters by Transesterification with Ethanol Using (Cyclopentadienyl)titanium Trichlorides
by Yuriko Ohki, Yohei Ogiwara and Kotohiro Nomura
Catalysts 2023, 13(2), 421; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal13020421 - 16 Feb 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2353
Abstract
Exclusive chemical conversions of polyesters [poly(ethylene adipate) (PEA), poly(butylene adipate) (PBA), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT)] to the corresponding monomers (diethyl adipate, diethyl terephthalate, ethylene glycol, 1,4-butane diol) by transesterification with ethanol using Cp’TiCl3 (Cp’ = Cp, Cp*) catalyst have been [...] Read more.
Exclusive chemical conversions of polyesters [poly(ethylene adipate) (PEA), poly(butylene adipate) (PBA), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT)] to the corresponding monomers (diethyl adipate, diethyl terephthalate, ethylene glycol, 1,4-butane diol) by transesterification with ethanol using Cp’TiCl3 (Cp’ = Cp, Cp*) catalyst have been demonstrated. The present acid-base-free depolymerizations by Cp’TiCl3 exhibited completed conversions (>99%) of PET, PBT to afford diethyl terephthalate and ethylene glycol or 1,4-butane diol exclusively (selectivity >99%) without formation of any other by-products in the NMR spectra (150–170 °C, Ti 1.0, or 2.0 mol%). The resultant reaction mixture after the depolymerization of PBA with ethanol via the CpTiCl3 catalyst (1.0 mol%, 150 °C, 3 h), consisting of diethyl adipate and 1,4-butane diol, was heated at 150 °C in vacuo for 24 h to afford high molecular weight recycled PBA with unimodal molecular weight distribution (Mn = 11,800, Mw/Mn = 1.6), strongly demonstrating a possibility of one-pot (acid-base-free) closed-loop chemical recycling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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18 pages, 2185 KiB  
Article
Cobalt-Copper Oxide Catalysts for VOC Abatement: Effect of Co:Cu Ratio on Performance in Ethanol Oxidation
by Květa Kupková, Pavel Topka, Jana Balabánová, Martin Koštejn, Květuše Jirátová, Jean-Marc Giraudon, Jean-Francois Lamonier, Jaroslav Maixner and František Kovanda
Catalysts 2023, 13(1), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal13010107 - 03 Jan 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1912
Abstract
The effect of the Co-Cu oxide catalysts composition on their physicochemical properties and performance in the deep oxidation of ethanol was studied. The catalysts with Co:Cu molar ratios of 4:1, 1:1, and 1:4 were obtained by calcination (4 h at 500 °C in [...] Read more.
The effect of the Co-Cu oxide catalysts composition on their physicochemical properties and performance in the deep oxidation of ethanol was studied. The catalysts with Co:Cu molar ratios of 4:1, 1:1, and 1:4 were obtained by calcination (4 h at 500 °C in air) of the coprecipitated precursors and characterized in detail using powder XRD, Raman spectroscopy, N2 physisorption, H2-TPR, and XPS. The powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy indicated the formation of Co3O4 and CuO mixtures rather than Co-Cu mixed oxides. The CuO promoted the Co3O4 reduction; the Co-Cu catalysts were reduced more easily than the single-component Co and Cu oxides and the main reduction maxima were shifted to lower temperatures with increasing cobalt content in the catalysts. The Co-Cu oxide catalyst with a Co:Cu molar ratio of 4:1 exhibited the best performance in ethanol gas-phase oxidation, showing the lowest T50 (91 °C) and T90(CO2) (159 °C) temperatures needed for 50% ethanol conversion and 90% conversion to CO2, respectively. The excellent catalytic properties of this Co-Cu oxide catalyst were ascribed to the synergistic effect of Co and Cu components. The high activity and selectivity of the Co-Cu catalyst was attributed to the presence of finely dispersed CuO particles on the surface of Co3O4. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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12 pages, 7622 KiB  
Article
Interface Engineering of SRu-mC3N4 Heterostructures for Enhanced Electrochemical Hydrazine Oxidation Reactions
by Ajay Munde, Priti Sharma, Somnath Dhawale, Ravishankar G. Kadam, Subodh Kumar, Hanumant B. Kale, Jan Filip, Radek Zboril, Bhaskar R. Sathe and Manoj B. Gawande
Catalysts 2022, 12(12), 1560; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12121560 - 02 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1640
Abstract
Hydrazine oxidation in single-atom catalysts (SACs) could exploit the efficiency of metal atom utilization, which is a substitution for noble metal-based electrolysers that results in reduced overall cost. A well-established ruthenium single atom over mesoporous carbon nitride (SRu-mC3N4) catalyst [...] Read more.
Hydrazine oxidation in single-atom catalysts (SACs) could exploit the efficiency of metal atom utilization, which is a substitution for noble metal-based electrolysers that results in reduced overall cost. A well-established ruthenium single atom over mesoporous carbon nitride (SRu-mC3N4) catalyst is explored for the electro-oxidation of hydrazine as one of the model reactions for direct fuel cell reactions. The electrochemical activity observed with linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) confirmed that SRu-mC3N4 shows an ultra-low onset potential of 0.88 V vs. RHE, and with a current density of 10 mA/cm2 the observed potential was 1.19 V vs. RHE, compared with mesoporous carbon nitride (mC3N4) (1.77 V vs. RHE). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and chronoamperometry (i-t) studies on SRu-mC3N4 show a smaller charge-transfer resistance (RCt) of 2950 Ω and long-term potential, as well as current stability of 50 h and 20 mA/cm2, respectively. Herein, an efficient and enhanced activity toward HzOR was demonstrated on SRu-mC3N4 from its synergistic platform over highly porous C3N4, possessing large and independent active sites, and improving the subsequent large-scale reaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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13 pages, 4953 KiB  
Article
Bioenergy Generation and Wastewater Purification with Li0.95Ta0.76Nb0.19Mg0.15O3 as New Air-Photocathode for MFCs
by Noureddine Touach, Abdellah Benzaouak, Jamil Toyir, Adnane El Hamidi, Mohammed El Mahi, El Mostapha Lotfi, Mohamed Kacimi and Leonarda Francesca Liotta
Catalysts 2022, 12(11), 1424; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12111424 - 13 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1308
Abstract
MFC is a promising technology that can be used for simultaneous electricity generation and wastewater treatment. Power energy generation of a ferroelectric cathodic ceramic, Li0.95Ta0.76Nb0.19Mg0.15O3 (LTNMg), has been measured in microbial fuel cells, integrating [...] Read more.
MFC is a promising technology that can be used for simultaneous electricity generation and wastewater treatment. Power energy generation of a ferroelectric cathodic ceramic, Li0.95Ta0.76Nb0.19Mg0.15O3 (LTNMg), has been measured in microbial fuel cells, integrating a single chamber fed by industrial wastewater (CODinitial = 471 mg L−1, and pHinitial = 7.24 at T = 27 °C). In this process, the mixed multicomponent oxide material has been prepared and characterized by XRD, PSD, TEM, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The catalytic activity has been investigated by COD determination, analysis of heavy metals, and polarization measurement. The results show a high COD reduction efficiency, which reaches 95.70% after a working time of 168 h with a maximal power density of 228 mW m−2. In addition, the maximum value of generated voltage in the open-circuit potential (OCP) of this MFC configuration has been increased from 340 mV in the absence of a light source to 470 mV under irradiation, indicating the presence of a promoting photocatalytic effect of LTNMg, which improved the process of the cathodic electron transfer inside the MFC device. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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8 pages, 3735 KiB  
Article
Facile Preparation and Promising Hydrothermal Stability of Spherical γ-Alumina Support with High Specific Surface Area
by Yi Zhang, Yimin Lv, Yufan Mo, Huiyu Li, Pinggui Tang, Dianqing Li and Yongjun Feng
Catalysts 2022, 12(11), 1416; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12111416 - 11 Nov 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1448
Abstract
It is of great importance to develop a spherical γ-alumina support with high hydrothermal stability to be used in platinum reforming catalyst processes. The porous pseudo-boehmite powder with a high surface area was first synthesized via a simple separate nucleation and aging steps [...] Read more.
It is of great importance to develop a spherical γ-alumina support with high hydrothermal stability to be used in platinum reforming catalyst processes. The porous pseudo-boehmite powder with a high surface area was first synthesized via a simple separate nucleation and aging steps method, and was then used as a precursor to produce a spherical γ-Al2O3 support via an oil–ammonia column method. The as-synthesized pseudo-boehmite has a substantially greater specific surface area of 336.0 m2·g−1 in comparison with the commercial Sasol boehmite powder (293.0 m2·g−1) from Sasol Chemicals. In addition, the as-prepared spherical γ-Al2O3 support derived from the as-synthesized pseudo-boehmite also possesses a higher specific surface area of 280.0 m2·g−1 compared to the corresponding Sasol sample. Moreover, the as-prepared spherical γ-Al2O3 balls demonstrate a much higher specific surface area of 185.0 m2·g−1 compared with the Sasol sample of 142.0 m2·g−1 after hydrothermal tests at 600 °C, suggesting its promising application in the chemical industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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12 pages, 2746 KiB  
Article
A Study of Support Effects for the Water-Gas-Shift Reaction over Cu
by Jian Chang, Zhuoming Feng, John M. Vohs and Raymond J. Gorte
Catalysts 2022, 12(11), 1364; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12111364 - 04 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1461
Abstract
The water–gas-shift (WGS) reaction was studied on a series of supported Cu catalysts in which the MgAl2O4 (MAO) support was modified by depositing ZnO, CeO2, Mn2O3 and CoO using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Addition of [...] Read more.
The water–gas-shift (WGS) reaction was studied on a series of supported Cu catalysts in which the MgAl2O4 (MAO) support was modified by depositing ZnO, CeO2, Mn2O3 and CoO using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Addition of Cu by one ALD cycle gave rise to catalysts with nominally 1-wt% Cu. A 1.1-wt% Cu/MAO catalyst prepared by ALD exhibited twice the dispersion but ten times the WGS activity of a 1-wt% Cu/MAO catalyst prepared by impregnation, implying that the reaction is structure sensitive. However, Cu catalysts prepared with the ZnO, CeO2, and Mn2O3 films showed negligible differences from that of the Cu/MAO catalyst, implying that these oxides did not promote the reaction. Cu catalysts prepared on the CoO film showed a slightly lower activity, possibly due to alloy formation. The implications of these results for the development of better WGS catalysts is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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24 pages, 7345 KiB  
Article
Efficient Removal of Organic Dye from Aqueous Solution Using Hierarchical Zeolite-Based Biomembrane: Isotherm, Kinetics, Thermodynamics and Recycling Studies
by Sabarish Radoor, Jasila Karayil, Aswathy Jayakumar, Jaewoo Lee, Debabrata Nandi, Jyotishkumar Parameswaranpillai, Bishweshwar Pant and Suchart Siengchin
Catalysts 2022, 12(8), 886; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12080886 - 12 Aug 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2242
Abstract
Bio adsorbents have received tremendous attention due to their eco-friendly, cheap and non-toxic nature. Recently, bio-adsorbent-based membranes have been frequently employed for water treatment. The work reports the preparation of a novel adsorbent membrane from hierarchical zeolite, polyvinyl alcohol, carboxymethyl cellulose and agar. [...] Read more.
Bio adsorbents have received tremendous attention due to their eco-friendly, cheap and non-toxic nature. Recently, bio-adsorbent-based membranes have been frequently employed for water treatment. The work reports the preparation of a novel adsorbent membrane from hierarchical zeolite, polyvinyl alcohol, carboxymethyl cellulose and agar. The fabricated membrane was characterized spectroscopically and microscopically with several techniques such as XRD, UTM, TGA, optical microscopy and FT-IR, as well as contact-angle studies. The result showed that the hierarchical-zeolite-loaded membrane is superior in terms of thermal stability, mechanical properties and surface roughness. The fabricated membrane was investigated for its efficiency in the removal of Congo red dye in aqueous conditions. The influence of pH, temperature, contact period and the initial concentration of dye and zeolite loading on the adsorption process are also explored. The adsorption results highlighted the maximum sorption property of Congo red on agar/zeolite/carboxymethyl cellulose/polymer biomembrane was found to be higher (15.30 mg/g) than that of zeolite powder (6.4 mg/g). The adsorption isotherms and kinetic parameters were investigated via Langmuir, Freundlich and pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and the intraparticle diffusion model, respectively. The adsorption isotherms fitted well for both considered isotherms, whereas pseudo-second order fitted well for kinetics. The thermodynamic parameter, ΔG at 303 K, 313 K and 323 K was −9.12, −3.16 and −0.49 KJ/mol, respectively. The work further explores the antibacterial efficacy of the prepared membrane and its reusability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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7 pages, 2425 KiB  
Communication
Iridium(triNHC)-Catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation of Glycerol Carbonate without Exogenous Reductants
by Yeon-Joo Cheong, Mi-hyun Lee, Heemin Byeon, Jiyong Park, Sungju Yu and Hye-Young Jang
Catalysts 2022, 12(6), 656; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12060656 - 15 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1778
Abstract
The iridium(Ir) (triNHC = tri-N-heterocyclic carbene)-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of glycerol carbonate (GC) is described in the absence of additional hydride sources. The described reduction provides a sustainable route to produce industrially-valuable formate and lactate with high turnover numbers (TONs). The bimetallic [...] Read more.
The iridium(Ir) (triNHC = tri-N-heterocyclic carbene)-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of glycerol carbonate (GC) is described in the absence of additional hydride sources. The described reduction provides a sustainable route to produce industrially-valuable formate and lactate with high turnover numbers (TONs). The bimetallic Ir(I) involving triNHC carbene ligands exhibits high TONs, and the reaction mechanism, including the bimetallic Ir(triNHC) catalyst, is proposed based on mechanistic studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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16 pages, 2679 KiB  
Article
Partial Hydrogenation of Soybean and Waste Cooking Oil Biodiesel over Recyclable-Polymer-Supported Pd and Ni Nanoparticles
by Ambra Maria Fiore, Giuseppe Romanazzi, Cristina Leonelli, Piero Mastrorilli and Maria Michela Dell’Anna
Catalysts 2022, 12(5), 506; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12050506 - 30 Apr 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2240
Abstract
Biodiesel obtained through the transesterification in methanol of vegetable oils, such as soybean oil (SO) and waste cooking oil (WCO), cannot be used as a biofuel for automotive applications due to the presence of polyunsaturated fatty esters, which have a detrimental effect on [...] Read more.
Biodiesel obtained through the transesterification in methanol of vegetable oils, such as soybean oil (SO) and waste cooking oil (WCO), cannot be used as a biofuel for automotive applications due to the presence of polyunsaturated fatty esters, which have a detrimental effect on oxidation stability (OS). A method of upgrading this material is the catalytic partial hydrogenation of the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) mixture. The target molecule of the partial hydrogenation reaction is monounsaturated methyl oleate (C18:1), which represents a good compromise between OS and the cold filter plugging point (CFPP) value, which becomes too high if the biodiesel consists of unsaturated fatty esters only. In the present work, polymer-supported palladium (Pd-pol) and nickel (Ni-pol) nanoparticles were separately tested as catalysts for upgrading SO and WCO biodiesels under mild conditions (room temperature for Pd-pol and T = 100 °C for Ni-pol) using dihydrogen (p = 10 bar) as the reductant. Both catalysts were obtained through co-polymerization of the metal containing monomer M(AAEMA)2 (M = Pd, Ni; AEEMA = deprotonated form of 2-(acetoacetoxy)ethyl methacrylate)) with co-monomers (ethyl methacrylate for Pd and N,N-dimethylacrilamide for Ni) and cross-linkers (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate for Pd and N,N’-methylene bis-acrylamide for Ni), followed by reduction. The Pd-pol system became very active in the hydrogenation of C=C double bonds, but poorly selective towards the desirable C18:1 product. The Ni-pol catalyst was less active than Pd-pol, but very selective towards the mono-unsaturated product. Recyclability tests demonstrated that the Ni-based system retained its activity and selectivity with both the SO and WCO substrates for at least five subsequent runs, thus representing an opportunity for waste biomass valorization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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17 pages, 3545 KiB  
Article
Dimethyl Ether Hydrolysis over WO3/γ-Al2O3 Supported Catalysts
by Maria Smyrnioti and Theophilos Ioannides
Catalysts 2022, 12(4), 396; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12040396 - 01 Apr 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2458
Abstract
Dimethyl ether (DME) is considered an alternative hydrogen carrier with potential use in fuel cells and automotive and domestic applications. Dimethyl ether hydrolysis to methanol is a thermodynamically limited reaction catalyzed by solid-acid catalysts, mainly Al2O3 and zeolites. Moreover, it [...] Read more.
Dimethyl ether (DME) is considered an alternative hydrogen carrier with potential use in fuel cells and automotive and domestic applications. Dimethyl ether hydrolysis to methanol is a thermodynamically limited reaction catalyzed by solid-acid catalysts, mainly Al2O3 and zeolites. Moreover, it is the rate-limiting step of the DME steam reforming reaction, which is employed for the production of hydrogen fuel for fuel cell feeding. In the present study, the performance of WO3/Al2O3 catalysts (0–44% wt. WO3) was tested in DME hydrolysis reaction. The catalysts were characterized by means of N2-physisorption, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, NH3-TPD and 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine adsorption experiments. The reaction rate of DME hydrolysis exhibited a volcanic trend as a function of tungsten surface density, while the best-performing catalyst was 37WO3/Al2O3, with a tungsten surface density of 7.4 W/nm2, noting that the theoretical monolayer coverage for the specific system is 4–5 W/nm2. Brønsted acidity was directly associated with the catalytic activity, following the same volcanic trend as a function of tungsten surface density. Blocking of Brønsted acid sites with 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine led to a dramatic decrease in hydrolysis rates by 40 times, proving that Brønsted acid sites are primarily responsible for the catalytic activity. Thus, the type and strength rather than the concentration of acid sites are the key factors influencing the catalytic activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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14 pages, 2228 KiB  
Article
Lignin as a Bio-Sourced Secondary Template for ZSM-5 Zeolite Synthesis
by Camila Gomes Flores, Helena Schneider and Benoit Louis
Catalysts 2022, 12(4), 368; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12040368 - 24 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1985
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the addition of lignin as a sacrificial agent in ZSM-5 zeolite synthesis. Peculiar growths of ZSM-5 crystals leading to various textural properties were observed. Hence, the behavior in acid-catalyzed conversion of methanol [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the addition of lignin as a sacrificial agent in ZSM-5 zeolite synthesis. Peculiar growths of ZSM-5 crystals leading to various textural properties were observed. Hence, the behavior in acid-catalyzed conversion of methanol into hydrocarbons (MTH) shifted from high selectivity toward olefins (>55%) to the sole formation of dimethyl ether (DME). Lignin acted as a bio-sourced secondary template (BSST), impacting the zeolite crystals’ shape and, thus, their physicochemical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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10 pages, 1592 KiB  
Article
Efficient Synthesis of Dihydropyrimidines Using a Highly Ordered Mesoporous Functionalized Pyridinium Organosilica
by Fatemeh Rajabi, Mika Sillanpää, Christophe Len and Rafael Luque
Catalysts 2022, 12(3), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12030350 - 21 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3006 | Correction
Abstract
A Brönsted acidic ionic solid pyridinium-functionalized organosilica network (PMO-Py-IL) was demonstrated to efficiently catalyse one-pot Biginelli condensation reaction. The green synthesis of 3,4-dihydro-2(H)-pyrimidinones (DHPMs) with high yield was carried out via one-pot three component condensation of β- dicarbonyls, aldehydes, and urea in the [...] Read more.
A Brönsted acidic ionic solid pyridinium-functionalized organosilica network (PMO-Py-IL) was demonstrated to efficiently catalyse one-pot Biginelli condensation reaction. The green synthesis of 3,4-dihydro-2(H)-pyrimidinones (DHPMs) with high yield was carried out via one-pot three component condensation of β- dicarbonyls, aldehydes, and urea in the presence of a catalytic amount of PMO-Py-IL nanomaterial as an efficient nanocatalyst under solvent free conditions. Furthermore, the catalyst showed outstanding stability and could be easily separated and reused for at least ten reaction runs without significant loss of activity and product selectivity. The green protocol features simple set-up, cost-effectiveness, easy work-up, eco-friendly and mild reaction conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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13 pages, 21380 KiB  
Article
Polyaromatic Carboxylate Ligands Based Zn(II) Coordination Polymers for Ultrasound-Assisted One-Pot Tandem Deacetalization–Knoevenagel Reactions
by Anirban Karmakar, Mohamed M. A. Soliman, Elisabete C. B. A. Alegria, Maria Fátima C. Guedes da Silva and Armando J. L. Pombeiro
Catalysts 2022, 12(3), 294; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12030294 - 04 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2587
Abstract
Solvothermal reactions between the polyaromatic group containing carboxylic acid pro-ligands 5-{(pyren-1-ylmethyl)amino}isophthalic acid (H2L1) and 5-{(anthracen-9-ylmethyl)amino}isophthalic acid (H2L2) with Zn(NO3)2·6H2O led to the formation of the new 1D coordination polymer [...] Read more.
Solvothermal reactions between the polyaromatic group containing carboxylic acid pro-ligands 5-{(pyren-1-ylmethyl)amino}isophthalic acid (H2L1) and 5-{(anthracen-9-ylmethyl)amino}isophthalic acid (H2L2) with Zn(NO3)2·6H2O led to the formation of the new 1D coordination polymer [Zn(L1)(NMF)]n (1) and four other coordination polymers, [Zn(L1)(DMF)]n (2), [Zn(L1)(4,4′-Bipy)]n (3), [Zn(L2)(DMF)(H2O)2]n·n(H2O) (4) and [Zn2(L2)2(DMF)(CH3OH)]n (5), which were previously reported by our group. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that the CP 1 has a one-dimensional (1D) double-chain-type structure similar to that of CP 2. For CP 3, the assembly of the Zn(II) ion with a deprotonated L12− ligand and 4,4′-bipyridine produces a 3D network. CP 4 and 5 exhibit 1D linear and 2D layered-type structures. The ultrasound-assisted tandem reactions promoted by CPs have not yet been well studied. Thus, in the present work, we have investigated the catalytic activities of the newly synthesized CP 1, as well as of the other CPs 25, towards the tandem deacetalization–Knoevenagel condensation reactions of various acetals under ultrasonic irradiation. They proved to be highly efficient, with special emphasis on catalyst 1, which completely converted the substrate (benzaldehyde dimethyl acetal) into the desired product (2-benzylidenemalononitrile) after 2 h. The stability of the catalysts, namely regarding the action of ultrasonic radiation, was demonstrated by their reuse, where only a slight loss of activity was observed after four cycles. Heterogeneity was also demonstrated, and no leaching was detected over the various cycles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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10 pages, 4521 KiB  
Communication
Identification of New Dioxygenases Able to Recognize Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with High Aromaticity
by Apolonia Rodríguez, Sandra G. Zárate and Agatha Bastida
Catalysts 2022, 12(3), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12030279 - 02 Mar 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2383
Abstract
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), products from the incomplete combustion of crude oil, are pollutants present in nature. Ring hydroxylating dioxygenase enzymes are able to catalyze polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the biodegradation process with a high degree of stereo-, regio-, and enantiospecificity. In this [...] Read more.
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), products from the incomplete combustion of crude oil, are pollutants present in nature. Ring hydroxylating dioxygenase enzymes are able to catalyze polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the biodegradation process with a high degree of stereo-, regio-, and enantiospecificity. In this work, we present the first approximation of the binding modes of 9 PAHs with high aromaticity in the catalytic sites of biphenyl or naphthalene dioxygenases from four microorganisms usually used in bio-remediation processes: Sphingobium yanoikuyae, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, Pseudomonas sp. C18, and Paraburkholderia xenovorans. Molecular modeling studies of two biphenyl dioxygenases from Sphingobium yanoikuyae and Paraburkholderia xenovorans showed good binding affinity for PAHs with 2–4 benzene rings (fluoranthene, pyrene, and chrysene), and both enzymes had a similar amount of substrate binding. Molecular docking studies using naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. C18 showed that the enzyme is able to accommodate PAHs with high aromaticity (benzo(a)pyrene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene), with good docking scores. This study provides important insight into the utility of naphthalene dioxygenases in the degradation of HAPs with high aromaticity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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Review

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27 pages, 11503 KiB  
Review
H2O2-Based Selective Oxidations Catalyzed by Supported Polyoxometalates: Recent Advances
by Nataliya V. Maksimchuk and Oxana A. Kholdeeva
Catalysts 2023, 13(2), 360; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal13020360 - 06 Feb 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2162
Abstract
Polyoxometalates (POMs) are transition metal oxygen anionic clusters that are oxidatively and thermally robust due to their inorganic, metal oxide-like nature. The versatility of their structures and compositions ensures tunable acid and redox properties, solubility, and functionality. The potential of POMs as homogeneous [...] Read more.
Polyoxometalates (POMs) are transition metal oxygen anionic clusters that are oxidatively and thermally robust due to their inorganic, metal oxide-like nature. The versatility of their structures and compositions ensures tunable acid and redox properties, solubility, and functionality. The potential of POMs as homogeneous catalysts and building blocks for the construction of heterogeneous selective oxidations catalysts is being intensively investigated. POM catalysts immobilized on solid supports have the clear advantages of easy separation and reuse and, thus, better meet the requests of sustainable chemistry, provided that they are leaching-resistant under the reaction conditions. Here, we give a brief overview of recent advances in the field of liquid-phase selective oxidation of organic compounds using supported POMs and the green oxidant–hydrogen peroxide, with a focus on the critical issues of the catalyst stability and reusability. The scope and limitations of various approaches to POM immobilization are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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Other

2 pages, 777 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Rajabi et al. Efficient Synthesis of Dihydropyrimidines Using a Highly Ordered Mesoporous Functionalized Pyridinium Organosilica. Catalysts 2022, 12, 350
by Fatemeh Rajabi, Mika Sillanpää, Christophe Len and Rafael Luque
Catalysts 2023, 13(8), 1153; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal13081153 - 26 Jul 2023
Viewed by 596
Abstract
In the original publication [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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10 pages, 2854 KiB  
Perspective
Phenyl Formate as a CO Surrogate for the Reductive Cyclization of Organic Nitro Compounds to Yield Different N-Heterocycles: No Need for Autoclaves and Pressurized Carbon Monoxide
by Fabio Ragaini, Francesco Ferretti and Manar Ahmed Fouad
Catalysts 2023, 13(2), 224; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal13020224 - 18 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1395
Abstract
The reductive cyclization of different organic nitro compounds by carbon monoxide, catalyzed by transition metal complexes, is a very efficient and clean strategy for the synthesis of many N-heterocycles. However, its use requires the use of autoclaves and pressurized CO lines. In [...] Read more.
The reductive cyclization of different organic nitro compounds by carbon monoxide, catalyzed by transition metal complexes, is a very efficient and clean strategy for the synthesis of many N-heterocycles. However, its use requires the use of autoclaves and pressurized CO lines. In this perspective, the authors will present the results obtained in their laboratories on the use of phenyl formate as a convenient CO surrogate, able to liberate carbon monoxide under the reaction conditions and allowing the use of a cheap glass pressure tube as a reaction vessel. In most cases, yields were better than those previously reported by the use of pressurized CO, proving that the use of CO surrogates can be a viable alternative to the gaseous reagent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exclusive Papers of the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of Catalysts)
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