Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis II

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomass Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020) | Viewed by 9649

Special Issue Editors

School of Environmental Engineering, University of Seoul, Seoul 02504, Korea
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis for biomass and plastic conversion; catalysis pyrolysis; hydrodeoxygenation; supercritical liquefaction; VOC removal; DeNOx; removal of particulate matter
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Environmental Engineering, Daegu University, Gyeongsan 38453, Republic of Korea
Interests: green chemistry; biomass conversion; waste treatment; plastics treatment; catalytic upgrading; analytical pyrolysis; micro plastics analysis; material characterization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Tae Uk Han
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Guest Editor
Unit of Research for Practical Application, Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), Incheon 21990, Korea
Interests: catalytic pyrolysis of waste plastics; hydrodeoxygenation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue is a continuation of the previous successful Special Issue “Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis".

Owing to the increasing attention paid to organic polymers as a renewable energy source—including biomass, plastic wastes, and other municipal solid wastes (MSW)—research into the pyrolysis of these polymeric materials into liquid fuels or high-value chemicals has been rapidly expanding in the last decade. The primary pyrolysis vapors produced by the thermal decomposition of waste polymers, especially biomass, are the mixture of highly functionalized monomeric and oligomeric compounds such as aldehydes, acids, anhydrosugars, phenols, etc., which are unsuitable for use as fuels or chemicals. To date, a range of different catalytic materials, including zeolites, metal catalysts, and mixed metal oxides, have been applied to the pyrolysis process to shift the product distribution to value-added chemicals, such as aromatic hydrocarbons, olefins, paraffins, naphthenes, and ketones. However, many of them suffer from several disadvantages, such as fast deactivation, low selectivity, high process costs, etc. More research should be conducted on the catalytic pyrolysis of renewable polymer materials to increase the yield and selectivity to the targeted chemicals and extend the catalyst lifetime. In this regard, this Special Issue is dedicated to topics such as the catalytic pyrolysis of waste organic polymers and the catalytic upgrading of the pyrolysis oils derived from these polymers (e.g., hydrotreating). The study of new catalysts, new upgrading chemistry, co-processing with conventional feedstock, catalyst deactivation/regeneration, and so on, which can be implemented to the pyrolysis process, will be the primary topics for this Special Issue.

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript to this Special Issue. Reviews, communications, and full research papers related to the catalytic pyrolysis of biomass or the catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis oils are especially welcome.

Prof. Young-Kwon Park
Prof. Young-Min Kim
Dr. Tae Uk Han
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • catalytic fast pyrolysis
  • biomass
  • plastic
  • upgrading
  • bio-oil
  • pyrolysis oil
  • hydrodeoxygenation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 4246 KiB  
Article
Recyclabl Metal (Ni, Fe) Cluster Designed Catalyst for Cellulose Pyrolysis to Upgrade Bio-Oil
Catalysts 2020, 10(10), 1160; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10101160 - 09 Oct 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2032
Abstract
A new recyclable catalyst for pyrolysis has been developed by combining calculations and experimental methods. In order to understand the properties of the new cluster designed catalysts, cellulose (a major component of plants) as a biomass model compound was pyrolyzed and catalyzed with [...] Read more.
A new recyclable catalyst for pyrolysis has been developed by combining calculations and experimental methods. In order to understand the properties of the new cluster designed catalysts, cellulose (a major component of plants) as a biomass model compound was pyrolyzed and catalyzed with different cluster designed catalysts. The NiaFeb (2 ≤ a + b ≤ 6) catalyst clusters structures were calculated by using Gaussian and Materials Studio software to determine the relationships between catalyst structure and bio-oil components, which is essential to design cluster designed catalysts that can improve bio-oil quality. GC-MS analysis of the bio-oil was used to measure the effects on the different catalyst interactions with cellulose. It was found that the NiFe cluster designed catalysts can increase the yield of bio-oil from 35.8% ± 0.9% to 41.1% ± 0.6% and change the bio-oil composition without substantially increasing the water content, while substantially decreasing the sugar concentration from 40.1% ± 1.3% to 27.5% ± 0.9% and also producing a small amount of hydrocarbon compounds. The catalyst with a high Ni ratio also had high Gibbs free energy, ΔG, likely also influencing the decrease of sugar and acid while increasing the ketone concentrations. These results indicate the theoretical calculations can enhance the design next-generation cluster designed catalysts to improve bio-oil composition based upon experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis II)
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14 pages, 3087 KiB  
Article
Catalytic Pyrolysis of Tetra Pak over Acidic Catalysts
Catalysts 2020, 10(6), 602; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10060602 - 29 May 2020
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 3389
Abstract
The thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of two kinds of Tetra Pak waste (TP-1 and TP-2) over three different acidic catalysts—HZSM-5(SiO2/Al2O3, 30), HBeta (38), and Al-MCM-41(20)—were investigated in this study. Tetra Pak (TP) wastes consist of composite material [...] Read more.
The thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of two kinds of Tetra Pak waste (TP-1 and TP-2) over three different acidic catalysts—HZSM-5(SiO2/Al2O3, 30), HBeta (38), and Al-MCM-41(20)—were investigated in this study. Tetra Pak (TP) wastes consist of composite material comprising kraft paper, polyethylene (PE) film, and aluminum foil. Thermal decomposition behaviors during the pyrolysis of TPs were monitored using a thermogravimetric (TG) analyzer and tandem micro reactor-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TMR-GC/MS). Neither the interaction between the non-catalytic pyrolysis intermediates of kraft paper and PE, nor the effect of aluminum foil have been monitored during the non-catalytic TG analysis of TPs. The maximum decomposition temperatures of PE in TP-1 shifted from 465 °C to 432 °C by HBeta(38), 439 °C by HZSM-5(30), and 449 °C by Al-MCM-41(20), respectively. The results of the TMR-GC/MS analysis indicate that the non-catalytic pyrolysis of TPs results in the formation of large amounts of furans and heavy hydrocarbons and they are converted efficiently to aromatic hydrocarbons over the acidic catalysts. Among the three catalysts, HZSM-5(30) produced the largest amount of aromatic hydrocarbons, followed by HBeta(38) and Al-MCM-41(20) owing to their different acidity and pore size. Compared to TP-1, TP-2 produced a larger amount of aromatic hydrocarbons via catalytic pyrolysis because of its relatively larger PE content. The synergistic formation of aromatic hydrocarbons was also enhanced during the catalytic pyrolysis of TPs due to the effective role of PE as hydrogen donor to kraft paper. In terms of their catalytic effectiveness, HZSM-5(30) had a longer lifetime than HBeta(38). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis II)
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14 pages, 1339 KiB  
Article
Selective Production of Acetic Acid via Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Hexoses over Potassium Salts
Catalysts 2020, 10(5), 502; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10050502 - 02 May 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3690
Abstract
Glucose and fructose are widely available and renewable resources. They were used to prepare acetic acid (AA) under the catalysis of potassium acetate (KAc) by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The TGA result showed that [...] Read more.
Glucose and fructose are widely available and renewable resources. They were used to prepare acetic acid (AA) under the catalysis of potassium acetate (KAc) by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The TGA result showed that the KAc addition lowered the glucose’s thermal decomposition temperatures (about 30 °C for initial decomposition temperature and 40 °C for maximum mass loss rate temperature), implying its promotion of glucose’s decomposition. The Py-GC/MS tests illustrated that the KAc addition significantly altered the composition and distribution of hexose pyrolysis products. The maximum yield of AA was 52.1% for the in situ catalytic pyrolysis of glucose/KAc (1:0.25 wt/wt) mixtures at 350 °C for 30 s. Under the same conditions, the AA yield obtained from fructose was 48% and it increased with the increasing amount of KAc. When the ratio reached to 1:1, the yield was 53.6%. In comparison, a study of in situ and on-line catalytic methods showed that KAc can not only catalyze the primary cracking of glucose, but also catalyze the cracking of a secondary pyrolysis stream. KAc plays roles in both physical heat transfer and chemical catalysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis II)
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