Biocatalysts Advancement for Optimum Performance in Microbial Fuel Cells and Their Sub-types

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Biocatalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 8555

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Environmental Technology, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, George Town 11800, Penang, Malaysia
Interests: environmental water pollutants and their safe removal; preparation of various nano-materials to protect the environment; water and wastewater treatment; adsorption and ion exchange; microbial fuel cells; advanced oxidation process; activated carbons and their electrochemical properties; environmental catalysis
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Guest Editor
Biofuels Institute, School of Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, China
Interests: pollutant biodegradation; microbial fuel cell (extracellular electron transfer mechanism, nanostructured electrode, electrochemical active biofilm); microbial electrosynthesis (CO2 capture and transformation); microbial synthesis of functional nanomaterials; biosensors

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Guest Editor
Biofuels Institute, School of Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, China
Interests: Environmental Microbiology; Pollutants Bioremediation; Bio-electrochemistry, Microbial Electrosynthesis; Microbial Electrochemical System; Renewable Energy and Environmental Sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are novel devices that could be used for wastewater treatment and power generations simultaneously using electrochemically active bacteria as biocatalysts. Recently, many advancements have been tested in MFCs for better performance. The subtypes of MFCs, such as sediment MFCs, soil MFCs, sludge MFCs, and benthic MFCs, have attracted the attention of many researchers recently due to different electron transfer pathways in the solid medium rather than aquatic medium of MFCs. Many challenges in the subtypes of MFCs are addressed to obtain maximum performance. These subtypes could be employed as biosensors in their respective mediums. This Special Issue will focus on recent advancements in MFCs and their subtypes, such as efficient anode materials, coupling with other technologies, innovative applications, optimum designs, pollutant removal, and pilot scale-up.

The Special Issue will publish experimental and review papers, as well as short communications, discussing recent developments in microbial fuel cells and their subtypes for optimum performance. The topics of the papers to be submitted to this Special Issue are defined by the keywords presented below.

Dr. Mohd Rafatullah
Dr. Yang-Chun Yong
Dr. Syed Zaghum Abbas
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Microbial fuel cells
  • Novel electrodes materials
  • Pollutant removal
  • Simulation
  • Innovative applications
  • Biocatalyst
  • Sediment MFC
  • Soil MFC
  • Sludge MFC
  • Benthic MFCs
  • Power generation
  • Resource recovery
  • Electrogens

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 4486 KiB  
Article
Hierarchical Porous Carbon Fibers for Enhanced Interfacial Electron Transfer of Electroactive Biofilm Electrode
by Ruijie Wang, Xiaoshuai Wu, Chang Liu, Jing Yang, Xian Luo, Long Zou, Zhisong Lu and Yan Qiao
Catalysts 2022, 12(10), 1187; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12101187 - 7 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1306
Abstract
The nanoporous carbon fiber materials derived from electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers doped with zeolitic imidazolate framework are developed here and applied in the microbe fuel cell anode for enhanced interfacial electron transfer. Zeolitic imidazolate fram-8 (ZIF-8) could introduce a large number of mesopores [...] Read more.
The nanoporous carbon fiber materials derived from electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers doped with zeolitic imidazolate framework are developed here and applied in the microbe fuel cell anode for enhanced interfacial electron transfer. Zeolitic imidazolate fram-8 (ZIF-8) could introduce a large number of mesopores into fibers, which significantly promote indirect electron transfer mediated by flavins (IET). Moreover, it is noted that thinner fibers are more suitable for cytochromes-based direct electron transfer (DET). Furthermore, the enlarged fiber interspace strengthens the amount of biofilm loading but a larger interspace between thick fibers would hinder the formation of continuous biofilm. Consequently, the nanoporous carbon fiber derived from PAN/ZIF-8 composite with a 1:1 wt ratio shows the best performance according to its suitable mesoporous structure and optimal fiber diameter, which delivers a 10-fold higher maximum power density in microbial fuel cells compared to carbon fabric. In this work, we reveal that the proportion of IET and DET in the interfacial electron transfer process varies with different porous structures and fiber diameters, which may provide some insights for designing porous fiber electrodes for microbial fuel cells and also other devices of bioelectrochemical systems. Full article
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12 pages, 1484 KiB  
Article
Quantification of Internal Resistance Contributions of Sediment Microbial Fuel Cells Using Petroleum-Contaminated Sediment Enriched with Kerosene
by Luisa Alvarez-Benítez, Susana Silva-Martínez, Alfredo Hernandez-Perez, Sathish K. Kamaraj, Syed Zaghum Abbas and Alberto Alvarez-Gallegos
Catalysts 2022, 12(8), 871; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12080871 - 7 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1441
Abstract
Anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum-contaminated sediments can be accomplished by a sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC), but the recovered energy is very low (~4 mW m−2). This is due to a high internal resistance (Ri) that develops in the [...] Read more.
Anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum-contaminated sediments can be accomplished by a sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC), but the recovered energy is very low (~4 mW m−2). This is due to a high internal resistance (Ri) that develops in the SMFC. The evaluation of the main experimental parameters that contribute to Ri is essential for developing a feasible SMFC design and this task is normally performed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). A faster and easier alternative procedure to EIS is to fit the SMFC polarization curve to an electrochemical model. From there, the main resistance contributions to Ri are partitioned. This enables the development of a useful procedure for attaining a low SMFC Ri while improving its power output. In this study, the carbon-anode surface was increased, the biodegradation activity of the indigenous populations was improved (by the biostimulation method, i.e., the addition of kerosene), the oxygen reduction reaction was catalyzed, and a 0.8 M Na2SO4 solution was used as a catholyte at pH 2. As a result, the initial SMFC Ri was minimized 20 times, and its power output was boosted 47 times. For a given microbial fuel cell (MFC), the main resistance contributions to Ri, evaluated by the electrochemical model, were compared with their corresponding experimental results obtained by the EIS technique. Such a validation is also discussed herein. Full article
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28 pages, 5634 KiB  
Article
Mixture of Sludge and Chicken Manure in Membrane-Less Microbial Fuel Cell for Simultaneous Waste Treatment and Energy Recovery
by Nurul Najwa Adam Malik, Muhammad Najib Ikmal Mohd Sabri, Husnul Azan Tajarudin, Noor Fazliani Shoparwe, Hafiza Shukor, Muaz Mohd Zaini Makhtar, Syed Zaghum Abbas, Yang-Chun Yong and Mohd Rafatullah
Catalysts 2022, 12(7), 776; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12070776 - 13 Jul 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1680
Abstract
In addition to disposal issues, the abundance of sludge and chicken manure has been a rising issue in Malaysia. Membrane-less microbial fuel cell (ML-MFC) technology can be considered as one of the potential solutions to the issues of disposal and electricity generation. However, [...] Read more.
In addition to disposal issues, the abundance of sludge and chicken manure has been a rising issue in Malaysia. Membrane-less microbial fuel cell (ML-MFC) technology can be considered as one of the potential solutions to the issues of disposal and electricity generation. However, there is still a lack of information on the performance of an ML-MFC powered by sludge and chicken manure. Hence, with this project, we studied the performance of an ML-MFC supplemented with sludge and chicken manure, and its operating parameters were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) through central composite design (CCD). The optimum operating parameters were determined to be 35 °C, 75% moisture content, and an electrode distance of 3 cm. Correspondingly, the highest power density, COD removal efficiency, and biomass acquired through this study were 47.2064 mW/m2, 98.0636%, and 19.6730 mg/L, respectively. The obtained COD values for dewatered sludge and chicken manure were 708 mg/L and 571 mg/L, respectively. COD values were utilized as a standard value for the substrate degradation by Bacillus subtilis in the ML-MFC. Through proximate analyses conducted by elemental analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), the composition of carbon and magnesium for sludge and chicken manure was23.75% and 34.20% and 78.1575 mg/L and 71.6098 mg/L, respectively. The proposed optimal RSM parameters were assessed and validated to determine the ML-MFC operating parameters to be optimized by RSM (CCD). Full article
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Review

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18 pages, 6606 KiB  
Review
Biomass-Derived Carbon Anode for High-Performance Microbial Fuel Cells
by Jamile Mohammadi Moradian, Songmei Wang, Amjad Ali, Junying Liu, Jianli Mi and Hongcheng Wang
Catalysts 2022, 12(8), 894; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12080894 - 13 Aug 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2838
Abstract
Although microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been developed over the past decade, they still have a low power production bottleneck for practical engineering due to the ineffective interfacial bioelectrochemical reaction between exoelectrogens and anode surfaces using traditional carbonaceous materials. Constructing anodes from biomass [...] Read more.
Although microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been developed over the past decade, they still have a low power production bottleneck for practical engineering due to the ineffective interfacial bioelectrochemical reaction between exoelectrogens and anode surfaces using traditional carbonaceous materials. Constructing anodes from biomass is an effective strategy to tackle the current challenges and improve the efficiency of MFCs. The advantage features of these materials come from the well-decorated aspect with an enriched functional group, the turbostratic nature, and porous structure, which is important to promote the electrocatalytic behavior of anodes in MFCs. In this review article, the three designs of biomass-derived carbon anodes based on their final products (i.e., biomass-derived nanocomposite carbons for anode surface modification, biomass-derived free-standing three-dimensional carbon anodes, and biomass-derived carbons for hybrid structured anodes) are highlighted. Next, the most frequently obtained carbon anode morphologies, characterizations, and the carbonization processes of biomass-derived MFC anodes were systematically reviewed. To conclude, the drawbacks and prospects for biomass-derived carbon anodes are suggested. Full article
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