Biomedical Applications of Carbon Materials

A special issue of C (ISSN 2311-5629).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019) | Viewed by 29989

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
ANAMAD Ltd., Sussex Innovation Centre, Science Park Square, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SB, UK
Interests: nanostructured carbon materials for biomedical and environmental applications; liquid-phase adsorption of biomolecules; mechanism of biocompatibility; medical devices for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering; tissue scaffolds
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of activated charcoal in medicine as an oral adsorbent for treatment of acute poisoning has been known since ancient times. Recent scientific advances have introduced a great variety of novel carbon materials with diverse physical and chemical properties, porous structure and dimensions. Assessing their potential in biomedical applications as adsorbents and drug carriers, in biosensors and cosmetics and for tissue regeneration has attracted substantial attention and become a rapidly developing research field. The interest in such applications has also raised concerns about the possible negative impact of nanocarbons on human health, which has been studied by a number of research groups.

This Special Issue of C, journal of carbon research, will publish original papers, short communications and reviews on recent advances in "Biomedical applications of carbon materials.

Dr. Sergey Mikhalovsky
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. C is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Haemoperfusion
  • Nanocarbon
  • Drug carrier
  • CNT
  • Graphene
  • Charcoal
  • Activated carbon
  • Adsorption

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 4185 KiB  
Article
Microbiological Properties of Microwave-Activated Carbons Impregnated with Enoxil and Nanoparticles of Ag and Se
by Oleg Petuhov, Tudor Lupascu, Dominika Behunová, Igor Povar, Tatiana Mitina and Maria Rusu
C 2019, 5(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/c5020031 - 8 Jun 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3195
Abstract
Microwave-activated carbons from walnut shells (ACMW) were impregnated with Ag and Se nanoparticles and with the Enoxil biologically active preparation, and the microbiological properties of the obtained composites were studied. To increase the functionality of the adsorbent, the activated carbon was oxidized with [...] Read more.
Microwave-activated carbons from walnut shells (ACMW) were impregnated with Ag and Se nanoparticles and with the Enoxil biologically active preparation, and the microbiological properties of the obtained composites were studied. To increase the functionality of the adsorbent, the activated carbon was oxidized with ozone, resulting in ACMWO containing aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic groups. There was a considerable decrease in the specific surface of the activated carbon after the oxidation process. Nitrogen adsorption was used to determine the structural parameters of the activated carbons. A simultaneous thermal analysis was used to study the thermal behavior of intact and oxidized activated carbons. Infrared spectroscopy was applied to analyze the surface chemistry of the adsorbents. The microbiological activity of the activated carbons was studied using Escherichia coli bacteria and Candida albicans fungi. The kinetic study of the microbiological activity allowed the estimation of the bactericidal/fungicidal action time of the activated carbons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Applications of Carbon Materials)
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16 pages, 4598 KiB  
Article
A Multifunctional Wearable Device with a Graphene/Silver Nanowire Nanocomposite for Highly Sensitive Strain Sensing and Drug Delivery
by Ge Shi, Tianqing Liu, Zlatko Kopecki, Allison Cowin, Ivan Lee, Jing-Hong Pai, Sean E. Lowe and Yu Lin Zhong
C 2019, 5(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/c5020017 - 4 Apr 2019
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 6206
Abstract
Advances in wearable, highly sensitive and multifunctional strain sensors open up new opportunities for the development of wearable human interface devices for various applications such as health monitoring, smart robotics and wearable therapy. Herein, we present a simple and cost-effective method to fabricate [...] Read more.
Advances in wearable, highly sensitive and multifunctional strain sensors open up new opportunities for the development of wearable human interface devices for various applications such as health monitoring, smart robotics and wearable therapy. Herein, we present a simple and cost-effective method to fabricate a multifunctional strain sensor consisting of a skin-mountable dry adhesive substrate, a robust sensing component and a transdermal drug delivery system. The sensor has high piezoresisitivity to monitor real-time signals from finger bending to ulnar pulse. A transdermal drug delivery system consisting of polylactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles and a chitosan matrix is integrated into the sensor and is able to release the nanoparticles into the stratum corneum at a depth of ~60 µm. Our approach to the design of multifunctional strain sensors will lead to the development of cost-effective and well-integrated multifunctional wearable devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Applications of Carbon Materials)
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16 pages, 4391 KiB  
Article
Carbon-Based Magnetic Nanocarrier for Controlled Drug Release: A Green Synthesis Approach
by Jessica R. P. Oliveira, Raquel O. Rodrigues, Lillian Barros, Isabel C. F. R. Ferreira, Luís F. Marchesi, Martina Koneracka, Alena Jurikova, Vlasta Zavisova and Helder T. Gomes
C 2019, 5(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/c5010001 - 28 Dec 2018
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3420
Abstract
In this study, hydrophilic magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by green routes using a methanolic extract of Rubus ulmifolius Schott flowers. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles were coated with carbon-based shell for drug delivery application. The nanocomposites were further chemically functionalized with nitric acid and, [...] Read more.
In this study, hydrophilic magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by green routes using a methanolic extract of Rubus ulmifolius Schott flowers. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles were coated with carbon-based shell for drug delivery application. The nanocomposites were further chemically functionalized with nitric acid and, sequentially, with Pluronic® F68 (CMNPs-plur) to enhance their colloidal stability. The resulting material was dispersed in phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4 to study the Doxorubicin loading. After shaking for 48 h, 99.13% of the drug was loaded by the nanocomposites. Subsequently, the drug release was studied in different working phosphate buffer solutions (i.e., PB pH 4.5, pH 6.0 and pH 7.4) to determine the efficiency of the synthesized material for drug delivery as pH-dependent drug nanocarrier. The results have shown a drug release quantity 18% higher in mimicking tumor environment than in the physiological one. Therefore, this study demonstrates the ability of CMNPs-plur to release a drug with pH dependence, which could be used in the future for the treatment of cancer "in situ" by means of controlled drug release. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Applications of Carbon Materials)
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Review

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22 pages, 766 KiB  
Review
The Advances in Biomedical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes
by Timur Saliev
C 2019, 5(2), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/c5020029 - 23 May 2019
Cited by 71 | Viewed by 16305
Abstract
Unique chemical, physical, and biological features of carbon nanotubes make them an ideal candidate for myriad applications in industry and biomedicine. Carbon nanotubes have excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, high biocompatibility, flexibility, resistance to corrosion, nano-size, and a high surface area, which can [...] Read more.
Unique chemical, physical, and biological features of carbon nanotubes make them an ideal candidate for myriad applications in industry and biomedicine. Carbon nanotubes have excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, high biocompatibility, flexibility, resistance to corrosion, nano-size, and a high surface area, which can be tailored and functionalized on demand. This review discusses the progress and main fields of bio-medical applications of carbon nanotubes based on recently-published reports. It encompasses the synthesis of carbon nanotubes and their application for bio-sensing, cancer treatment, hyperthermia induction, antibacterial therapy, and tissue engineering. Other areas of carbon nanotube applications were out of the scope of this review. Special attention has been paid to the problem of the toxicity of carbon nanotubes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Applications of Carbon Materials)
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