Minimally Invasive Surgery in Ovarian Cancer

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Methods and Technologies Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 May 2024 | Viewed by 885

Special Issue Editors

Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Department of Woman and Child's Health and Public Health Sciences, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, 00168 Rome, Italy
Interests: cervical cancer; minimally invasive surgery; translational medicine; sentinel lymph node; gynecological cancers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Gynecologic Oncology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, 00168 Rome, Italy
Interests: cervical cancer; minimally invasive surgery; fertility sparing treatments; translational medicine; sentinel lymph node concept; gynecological cancers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ovarian cancer represents one of the most lethal cancers in women.  Data from the SEER database report a 5-year relative survival of 49.7%. Unfortunately, about 80% of cases are diagnosed in an advanced FIGO stage due to the lack of a screening protocol for this kind of disease and non-specific symptoms at diagnosis. There are five most common histological types of ovarian cancer (high-grade, low-grade, mucinous, endometrioid, and clear-cell), and they represent inherently different diseases, as indicated by differences in risk factors, molecular genetic abnormalities, natural history, and response to chemotherapy. Not only the histotype, but also the homologous recombination deficiency (HRD), status of BRCA genes, and pathological factors have been shown to have an impact on the history of the disease; the addition of bevacizumab and PARP inhibitors has affected the treatment of ovarian cancer.

The aim of surgical treatment consists of complete cytoreduction in advanced stages and surgical staging in early stages, which can include, according to the histological type, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, hysterectomy, omentectomy, pelvic and aortic lymphadenectomy, peritoneal biopsies, and washing. Although guidelines still suggest laparotomy as the standard approach, in recent years minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has become more and more popular in the treatment of ovarian cancer, especially in the early stages, in which the 5-year relative survival exceeds 90% and patients’ quality of life cannot be overshadowed. MIS has been demonstrated to have a role even in advanced stages, in the prediction of optimal cytoreduction, identifying patients who may benefit from primary debulking surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy, identifying high-risk patients, starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy as soon as possible, and, more recently, in interval debulking surgery. Furthermore, the minimally invasive approach is extremely important in prophylactic surgeries in women with familial syndromes or germline mutations in BRCA genes and in fertility-sparing treatment, in which future attempts at pregnancy may be influenced by too-invasive surgery.

The aim of this Special Issue is to describe the minimally invasive approach, with its advantages and pitfalls, in the treatment of ovarian cancer, from early stage disease to advanced stages and recurrences. 

Dr. Luigi Pedone Anchora
Dr. Valerio Gallotta
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • minimally invasive surgery in early ovarian cancer 
  • robotic surgery 
  • secondary cytoreduction and minimally invasive surgery
  • HIPEC and minimally invasive surgery
  • interval debulking surgery and laparoscopy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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13 pages, 2455 KiB  
Review
Minimally-Invasive Secondary Cytoreduction in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer
Cancers 2023, 15(19), 4769; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15194769 - 28 Sep 2023
Viewed by 656
Abstract
The role of secondary cytoreductive surgery (SCS) in the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC) has been widely increased in recent years, especially in trying to improve the quality of life of these patients by utilising a minimally-invasive (MI) approach. However, surgery in [...] Read more.
The role of secondary cytoreductive surgery (SCS) in the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC) has been widely increased in recent years, especially in trying to improve the quality of life of these patients by utilising a minimally-invasive (MI) approach. However, surgery in previously-treated patients may be challenging, and patient selection and surgical planning are crucial. Unfortunately, at the moment, validated criteria to select patients for MI-SCS are not reported, and no predictors of its feasibility are currently available, probably due to the vast heterogeneity of recurrence patterns. The aim of this narrative review is to describe the role of secondary cytoreductive surgery and, in particular, minimally-invasive procedures, in ROC, analyzing patient selection, outcomes, criticisms, and future perspectives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minimally Invasive Surgery in Ovarian Cancer)
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