Female Malignancies and Immunotherapy: What’s New? (Volume II)

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 July 2024 | Viewed by 3548

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Experimental Medicine (DI.ME.S.), Histology Section, University of Genoa, Via G.B. Marsano 10, 16132 Genoa, Italy
Interests: human immunology; innate immunity; human natural killer cells; tumor immunology; immunotherapy; immune checkpoints
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Breast Surgery Clinic, San Martino Policlinic Hospital, 16132 Genoa, Italy
2. Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostic (DISC), School of Medicine, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
Interests: breast cancer; breast cancer surgery; breast reconstruction; breast cancer molecular subtypes; neo/adjuvant therapy for breast cancer

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Integrated Surgical and Diagnostic Sciences (DISC), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
2. Anatomic Pathology University Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy
Interests: gynecologic pathology; placental & fetal pathology; molecular pathology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Experimental Medicine (DI.ME.S.), Histology Section, University of Genoa, Via G.B. Marsano 10, 16132 Genoa, Italy
Interests: human natural killer cells; NK cell receptors; activating NK receptors; NKG2A; KIRs; PD-1; cancer immunosurveillance; cancer biology; tumor microenvironment; microRNAs; immunotherapy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is a continuation of our previous Issue, “Female Malignancies and Immunotherapy: What’s New?”

(https://www.mdpi.com/journal/cancers/special_issues/Malignancies_Immunotherapy)

Current emerging therapies for solid tumors include various immunotherapeutic approaches, such as immune-checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), which have gained considerable attention because of their impressive treatment outcomes in different tumor types. Unfortunately, benefits have been seen only in a small percentage of patients with solid tumors. For this reason, it is necessary to improve our knowledge on immune checkpoints (ICs) and on the tumor microenvironment.

In the cancer treatment context, T cells have always been considered primarily responsible for the beneficial effect of immunotherapy. However, NK cells are also now seen as a promising cancer immunotherapy tool due to their ability to kill malignant cells without toxicity towards healthy cells. However, cancers develop escape strategies to alter immune cells’ anti-tumor activity.

Among existing cancers, female malignancies present challenges in terms of diagnosis and the efficacy of clinical approaches. Indeed, female tumors are often characterized by an immunosuppressive tumor environment, able to resist not only immune system attack, but also advanced immunotherapeutic approaches.

The goal of this Special Issue, “Female Malignancies and Immunotherapy: What’s New? 2.0”, is to contribute to dissecting the molecular and cellular immunological mechanisms involved in female malignancies’ progression and metastasis. This information will provide new insights that are crucial for the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies and for the improvement of combination strategies in the patient-specific treatment of female cancers.

Dr. Silvia Pesce
Dr. Piero Fregatti
Dr. Valerio Gaetano Vellone
Dr. Emanuela Marcenaro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • ovarian cancer
  • cervical cancer
  • natural killer cells
  • immunotherapy
  • cancer immunology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

22 pages, 1600 KiB  
Review
The Dual Blockade of the TIGIT and PD-1/PD-L1 Pathway as a New Hope for Ovarian Cancer Patients
by Anna Pawłowska, Wiktoria Skiba, Dorota Suszczyk, Weronika Kuryło, Joanna Jakubowicz-Gil, Roman Paduch and Iwona Wertel
Cancers 2022, 14(23), 5757; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers14235757 - 23 Nov 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2942
Abstract
The prognosis for ovarian cancer (OC) patients is poor and the five-year survival rate is only 47%. Immune checkpoints (ICPs) appear to be the potential targets in up-and-coming OC treatment. However, the response of OC patients to immunotherapy based on programmed cell death [...] Read more.
The prognosis for ovarian cancer (OC) patients is poor and the five-year survival rate is only 47%. Immune checkpoints (ICPs) appear to be the potential targets in up-and-coming OC treatment. However, the response of OC patients to immunotherapy based on programmed cell death pathway (PD-1/PD-L1) inhibitors totals only 6–15%. The promising approach is a combined therapy, including other ICPs such as the T-cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain/CD155/DNAX accessory molecule-1 (TIGIT/CD155/DNAM-1) axis. Preclinical studies in a murine model of colorectal cancer showed that the dual blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 and TIGIT led to remission in the whole studied group vs. the regression of the tumors with the blockade of a single pathway. The approach stimulates the effector activity of T cells and NK cells, and redirects the immune system activity against the tumor. The understanding of the synergistic action of the TIGIT and PD-1/PD-L1 blockade is, however, poor. Thus, the aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the mode of action of the dual TIGIT and PD-1/PD-L1 blockade and its potential benefits for OC patients. Considering the positive impact of this combined therapy in malignancies, including lung and colorectal cancer, it appears to be a promising approach in OC treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Female Malignancies and Immunotherapy: What’s New? (Volume II))
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