Lifestyle, Environment and Respiratory Cancer Risk

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 16971

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, Austin, MN 55912, USA
Interests: inflammation and cancer biology; immunology and bacterial pathogenesis; mitochondrial metabolism; post-translational modification; dietary agents; drug discovery; protein structure biology; life-style and environmental cancer; risk factors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy & Biology, University of Seville, Seville, Spain
Interests: Aging; Senescence; Cancer; Neurodegenerative diseases; Stress and Inflammation and Natural Compounds

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Guest Editor
Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA
Interests: cancer and cell biology; public health; epidemiology; immunology; structure biology; cardio-oncology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancers risk appears to evolve over time as a possible result of changes in dietary, environmental and lifestyle factors, including bacterial infection, diet, drug abuse, radiations and stress; however, the etiology of cancer is complex; bacterial variability, host genetics and environmental factors are the strongest risk factors for the development of carcinoma. This relationship suggests that a need exists to investigate the mechanism as to how these factors combined with host factors might contribute to initiate cancer development. 

Therefore, through this Special Issue, “Lifestyle, Environment and Respiratory Cancer Risk”, we aim to highlight the relationship between lifestyle and environmental risk factors and cancer.

We encourage contributions that are focused on, but not limited to, the following themes:

  • Lifestyle factors (nutrition, tobacco use, physical activity);
  • Natural occurring exposures (ultraviolet light, gas, infectious agents);
  • Medical treatments (radiation and medicine);
  • Workplace and household exposures;
  • Pollution;
  • Respiratory cancer risk factors.

Dr. Faisal Aziz
Prof. Dr. Sandro Arguelles
Dr. Abhijit Chakraborty
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inflammation
  • carcinogenesis
  • dietary agent
  • drug abuse, life-style and environmental agent
  • stress and depression
  • infectious agent
  • radiation and respiratory risk factor

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 1405 KiB  
Article
Emergency Department Visits among Cancer Patients during SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic
by Davide Valsecchi, Luca Porcu, Abdelrahman Khater, Rosa Alessia Battista, Leone Giordano, Stefano Cascinu, Andrea Assanelli, Chiara Lazzari, Vanesa Gregorc and Aurora Mirabile
Cancers 2023, 15(4), 1240; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15041240 - 15 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1345
Abstract
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a global impact. Patients with cancer, their caregivers, and physicians need to balance the challenges associated with COVID-19 while ensuring cancer care. Nevertheless, emotional distress and hospital departmental reorganization could have led to a decrease [...] Read more.
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a global impact. Patients with cancer, their caregivers, and physicians need to balance the challenges associated with COVID-19 while ensuring cancer care. Nevertheless, emotional distress and hospital departmental reorganization could have led to a decrease in ED admissions even among oncological patients. Methods: We compared the 72 days of the pandemic in 2020 with the same calendar days in 2019 and 2021, defining a 20% decrease in ED visits as clinically significant. We studied the cause for visit, its severity, outcome (admission vs. discharge vs. death vs. hospice/palliative care), the tumor site, and method of arrival to the ED for the 3 time periods. Results: A significant decrease in ED oncological visits was found in 2020 compared to 2019, before returning to similar numbers in 2021. Fear, anxiety, and worry, in addition to hospital departmental reorganization, surely had an important role in the delay of ED visits, which resulted in irreparable consequences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lifestyle, Environment and Respiratory Cancer Risk)
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15 pages, 1673 KiB  
Article
Are Wellness Visits a Possible and Effective Cure for the Increasing Cancer Burden in Poland? Example of Women’s Preventive Services in the U.S.
by Paweł Koczkodaj, Fabian Camacho, George P. Batten and Roger T. Anderson
Cancers 2022, 14(17), 4296; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers14174296 - 1 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1983
Abstract
Background: Cancer is one of the leading causes of death among Polish women in general, and first in women aged 25–64. Contributing to this cancer burden are modifiable behavioral risk factors, including low utilization of cancer screenings. Poland has an urgent need for [...] Read more.
Background: Cancer is one of the leading causes of death among Polish women in general, and first in women aged 25–64. Contributing to this cancer burden are modifiable behavioral risk factors, including low utilization of cancer screenings. Poland has an urgent need for new systemic solutions that will decrease cancer burden in the female Polish population. This study examined the United States’ implementation of preventive wellness visits as a viable solution for implementation in Poland. Methods: Health insurance claims data for nearly three million women in five states of the U.S. were examined to identify use of mammograms, colorectal cancer screening, and lung cancer screening. Three subgroups of the cohort were assessed for the probability of receipt of screening associated with type of healthcare visit history (women with wellness visits—W; with wellness visits and related preventive services and screenings—W+P; and control group—C). All multiple comparisons were significant (alpha = 0.05) at p < 0.0001, except comparison between subgroups (W vs. P+W) for lung cancer screening. Results: Breast and colorectal cancer screenings had substantially higher participation after W and W+P in comparison with C; moreover, a slight increase after W or P+W was seen for lung cancer as well. Conclusions: Results indicate that wellness visits are an effective tool for increasing cancer screening among women in the U.S. Introduction of a similar solution in Poland could potentially help produce higher screening rates, address cancer prevention needs (not only for secondary cancer prevention), and lower cancer burden. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lifestyle, Environment and Respiratory Cancer Risk)
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Review

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32 pages, 2124 KiB  
Review
Vaping, Environmental Toxicants Exposure, and Lung Cancer Risk
by Shaimaa A. Shehata, Eman A. Toraih, Ezzat A. Ismail, Abeer M. Hagras, Ekramy Elmorsy and Manal S. Fawzy
Cancers 2023, 15(18), 4525; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15184525 - 12 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 7084
Abstract
Lung cancer (LC) is the second-most prevalent tumor worldwide. According to the most recent GLOBOCAN data, over 2.2 million LC cases were reported in 2020, with an estimated new death incident of 1,796,144 lung cancer cases. Genetic, lifestyle, and environmental exposure play an [...] Read more.
Lung cancer (LC) is the second-most prevalent tumor worldwide. According to the most recent GLOBOCAN data, over 2.2 million LC cases were reported in 2020, with an estimated new death incident of 1,796,144 lung cancer cases. Genetic, lifestyle, and environmental exposure play an important role as risk factors for LC. E-cigarette, or vaping, products (EVPs) use has been dramatically increasing world-wide. There is growing concern that EVPs consumption may increase the risk of LC because EVPs contain several proven carcinogenic compounds. However, the relationship between EVPs and LC is not well established. E-cigarette contains nicotine derivatives (e.g., nitrosnornicotine, nitrosamine ketone), heavy metals (including organometal compounds), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and flavorings (aldehydes and complex organics). Several environmental toxicants have been proven to contribute to LC. Proven and plausible environmental carcinogens could be physical (ionizing and non-ionizing radiation), chemicals (such as asbestos, formaldehyde, and dioxins), and heavy metals (such as cobalt, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and nickel). Air pollution, especially particulate matter (PM) emitted from vehicles and industrial exhausts, is linked with LC. Although extensive environmental exposure prevention policies and smoking reduction strategies have been adopted globally, the dangers remain. Combined, both EVPs and toxic environmental exposures may demonstrate significant synergistic oncogenicity. This review aims to analyze the current publications on the importance of the relationship between EVPs consumption and environmental toxicants in the pathogenesis of LC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lifestyle, Environment and Respiratory Cancer Risk)
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21 pages, 1374 KiB  
Review
Thyroid Carcinoma: A Review for 25 Years of Environmental Risk Factors Studies
by Eva Kruger, Eman A. Toraih, Mohammad H. Hussein, Shaimaa A. Shehata, Amani Waheed, Manal S. Fawzy and Emad Kandil
Cancers 2022, 14(24), 6172; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers14246172 - 14 Dec 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 5428
Abstract
Environmental factors are established contributors to thyroid carcinomas. Due to their known ability to cause cancer, exposure to several organic and inorganic chemical toxicants and radiation from nuclear weapons, fallout, or medical radiation poses a threat to global public health. Halogenated substances like [...] Read more.
Environmental factors are established contributors to thyroid carcinomas. Due to their known ability to cause cancer, exposure to several organic and inorganic chemical toxicants and radiation from nuclear weapons, fallout, or medical radiation poses a threat to global public health. Halogenated substances like organochlorines and pesticides can interfere with thyroid function. Like phthalates and bisphenolates, polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites, along with polybrominated diethyl ethers, impact thyroid hormones biosynthesis, transport, binding to target organs, and impair thyroid function. A deeper understanding of environmental exposure is crucial for managing and preventing thyroid cancer. This review aims to investigate the relationship between environmental factors and the development of thyroid cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lifestyle, Environment and Respiratory Cancer Risk)
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