Gaps in Cancer Cachexia Research

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Survivorship and Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2025 | Viewed by 1006

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
Interests: cancer cachexia; sarcopenia; regulation of body weight and glucose metabolism; skeletal muscle and adipose tissue metabolism

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
Interests: cancer cachexia; oncology rehabilitation; physical function

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The effective management of cancer cachexia requires the further characterization of pathogenesis and optimization of outcome assessments in preclinical and clinical models. We aim to publish manuscripts that fill gaps in the knowledge of rodent and human models of cancer cachexia with the ultimate goal of improving our understanding of patient’s functionality and lived experiences, thereby advancing clinical trial design and therapeutic development.

Topics of interest for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Innovative preclinical models and outcomes, including sex and/or age differences;
  • Standardization of functional outcomes and/or functional impairment;
  • Virtual or digital assessment of outcomes and validation with clinical outcomes;
  • Implementation science to bridge the knowledge/communication gap between healthcare providers and patients/caregivers;
  • Disparities in mechanisms, phenotype, and/or therapeutic response;
  • Innovative technologies to discern severity and/or therapeutic response;
  • Novel pre/rehabilitation approaches to improving therapeutic and/or functional outcomes;
  • Chronological vs. biological aging due to tumor and/or treatment burden;
  • Multi-organ/system approaches to characterizing pathogenesis and progression;
  • Improving translation of preclinical to clinical models.

We welcome the submission of original or review articles on these topics, but we will also consider other high-quality cancer cachexia-related submissions.

Dr. Jose M. Garcia
Dr. Lindsey J. Anderson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cancer cachexia
  • physical function
  • innovative models
  • rehabilitation
  • patient-reported outcomes
  • gender
  • aging
  • skeletal muscle
  • brain
  • adipose tissue

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

23 pages, 350 KiB  
Review
Clinical Relevance of Physical Function Outcomes in Cancer Cachexia
by Lucas Caeiro, Sofia Jaramillo Quiroz, Jenna S. Hegarty, Ellen Grewe, Jose M. Garcia and Lindsey J. Anderson
Cancers 2024, 16(7), 1395; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16071395 - 1 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Managing clinical manifestations of cancer/treatment burden on functional status and quality of life remains paramount across the cancer trajectory, particularly for patients with cachexia who display reduced functional capacity. However, clinically relevant criteria for classifying functional impairment at a single point in time [...] Read more.
Managing clinical manifestations of cancer/treatment burden on functional status and quality of life remains paramount across the cancer trajectory, particularly for patients with cachexia who display reduced functional capacity. However, clinically relevant criteria for classifying functional impairment at a single point in time or for classifying meaningful functional changes subsequent to disease and/or treatment progression are lacking. This unmet clinical need remains a major obstacle to the development of therapies for cancer cachexia. This review aims to describe current literature-based evidence for clinically meaningful criteria for (1) functional impairment at a single timepoint between cancer patients with or without cachexia and (2) changes in physical function over time across interventional studies conducted in patients with cancer cachexia. The most common functional assessment in cross-sectional and interventional studies was hand grip strength (HGS). We observed suggestive evidence that an HGS deficit between 3 and 6 kg in cancer cachexia may display clinical relevance. In interventional studies, we observed that long-duration multimodal therapies with a focus on skeletal muscle may benefit HGS in patients with considerable weight loss. Future studies should derive cohort-specific clinically relevant criteria to confirm these observations in addition to other functional outcomes and investigate appropriate patient-reported anchors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gaps in Cancer Cachexia Research)
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