Feature Paper in Section 'Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention' in 2024

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 1718

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
2. Cancer Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
Interests: cancer prevention; health services research; health disparities; rural health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Cancer Epidemiology and Primary Prevention Department, Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology, 02-781 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: cancer prevention; cancer epidemiology; health education; public health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer prevention and cancer epidemiology are among the most crucial elements of oncology. Primary and secondary cancer prevention provide efficient tools which aim to reduce risk factor exposure, as well as allow us to detect cancer at the very early stage. It has been estimated that at least 50% of all cancer cases could be prevented if we follow healthy lifestyle recommendations. Moreover, cancer epidemiology gives us a broad picture on how efficient cancer prevention is and where further improvement is needed. Thanks to cancer epidemiology, we can also observe changes in health behaviors, cancer incidence, and treatment efficacy as a result of policy. 

We would like to invite you to submit papers (original and review articles) thematically connected to the scope of this Special Issue. We are particularly, but not exclusively, interested in papers focused on the effects of policies, community programs, and the implementation of new practices on cancer prevention. We believe that Cancers is an ideal platform to exchange perspectives and to present the results of studies on cancer prevention and epidemiology. 

Prof. Dr. Roger Anderson
Dr. Paweł Koczkodaj
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cancer prevention
  • cancer epidemiology
  • health policy
  • public health
  • global health
  • health education
  • health promotion

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

16 pages, 309 KiB  
Review
Causes of Childhood Cancer: A Review of the Recent Literature: Part I—Childhood Factors
by Angela M. Ricci, Rebecca T. Emeny, Pamela J. Bagley, Heather B. Blunt, Mary E. Butow, Alexandra Morgan, Jennifer A. Alford-Teaster, Linda Titus, Raymond R. Walston III and Judy R. Rees
Cancers 2024, 16(7), 1297; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16071297 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1460
Abstract
Purpose: To review the childhood risk factors for pediatric cancer (diagnosis before age 20). Methods: We conducted literature searches using Ovid Medline and Scopus to find primary research studies, review articles, and meta-analyses published from 2014 to 3 March 2021. Results: Strong evidence [...] Read more.
Purpose: To review the childhood risk factors for pediatric cancer (diagnosis before age 20). Methods: We conducted literature searches using Ovid Medline and Scopus to find primary research studies, review articles, and meta-analyses published from 2014 to 3 March 2021. Results: Strong evidence indicates that an array of genetic and epigenetic phenomena, structural birth defects, and chromosomal anomalies are associated with an increased risk of various childhood cancers. Increased risk is also associated with prior cancer, likely due to previous treatment agents and therapeutic ionizing radiation. Convincing evidence supports associations between several pediatric cancers and ionizing radiation, immunosuppression, and carcinogenic virus infection both in healthy children and in association with immune suppression following organ transplantation. Breastfeeding and a childhood diet rich in fruits and vegetables appears to reduce the risk of pediatric leukemia but the evidence is less strong. Childhood vaccination against carcinogenic viruses is associated with a lower risk of several cancers; there is less strong evidence that other childhood vaccinations more broadly may also lower risk. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is associated with increased melanoma risk, although most melanomas following childhood UV exposure occur later, in adulthood. Evidence is weak or conflicting for the role of body mass index, other childhood infections, allergies, and certain treatments, including immunomodulator medications and human growth therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper in Section 'Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention' in 2024)
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