Skin Cancer: Risk Factors and Prevention

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 2556

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Dermatology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1H 8M2, Canada
Interests: skin cancer; melanoma; non-melanoma skin cancer; cutaneous lymphomas

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Guest Editor
1. Division of Dermatology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada
2. President-Elect, Skin Research Group of Canada, Montreal, QC, Canada
Interests: cutaneous lymphoma; melanoma; basal cell carcinoma; carcinoma; squamous cell carcinoma
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
Interests: cutaneous lymphoma; psoriasis; genomics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Cancers will focus on the critical subject of skin-related "Skin Cancer: Risk Factors and Prevention." Skin cancer continues to be a significant public health concern, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. As the incidence of skin cancer continues to rise, understanding the risk factors and implementing effective prevention strategies becomes of paramount importance.

This Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive platform for researchers, clinicians, and public health experts to share their latest findings, innovative approaches, and evidence-based interventions in the field of skin cancer. We invite authors to contribute original research papers, reviews, and perspectives that delve into various aspects of skin cancer. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Identification and characterization of risk factors associated with different types of skin cancer;
  • Advances in molecular and genetic understanding of skin cancer development, and latest on screening tools;
  • Epidemiological studies exploring the prevalence and incidence of skin cancer across different populations;
  • Innovative prevention strategies, including public education campaigns, behavioral interventions, and screening programs;
  • Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of existing preventive measures, such as sunscreen use, protective clothing, and UV radiation avoidance;
  • Emerging technologies and approaches for early detection and diagnosis of skin cancer.

By addressing these topics, we aim to enhance our knowledge of skin cancer risk factors, identify effective preventive measures, and ultimately reduce the burden of this disease on individuals and healthcare systems. We welcome contributions from diverse disciplines, including dermatology, oncology, public health, genetics, epidemiology, and behavioral sciences.

Join us in this collective effort to combat skin cancer and contribute to the growing body of knowledge that guides effective prevention strategies and improves patient outcomes. Together, we can make a tangible impact in reducing the global burden of skin cancer.

Dr. Feras M. Ghazawi
Dr. Ivan V. Litvinov
Prof. Dr. Robert Gniadecki
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • skin cancer
  • dermatology
  • risk factors
  • prevention
  • screening
  • early detection
  • epidemiology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 669 KiB  
Article
Incidence and Relative Survival of Patients with Merkel Cell Carcinoma in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, 2008–2021
by Andreas Stang, Lennart Möller, Ina Wellmann, Kevin Claaßen, Hiltraud Kajüter, Selma Ugurel and Jürgen C. Becker
Cancers 2024, 16(11), 2158; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16112158 - 6 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Background: To date, only a few population-representative studies have been carried out on the rare Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). We provide incidence and survival estimates of MCC, including the conditional relative survival. Methods: We analyzed data from the cancer registry of North Rhine-Westphalia, [...] Read more.
Background: To date, only a few population-representative studies have been carried out on the rare Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). We provide incidence and survival estimates of MCC, including the conditional relative survival. Methods: We analyzed data from the cancer registry of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, 2008–2021, covering a population of 18 million. We included all newly diagnosed MCCs and calculated age-standardized (old European Standard population) incidence rates and unconditional and conditional relative survival. Results: Our analysis included 2164 MCC patients. The age-standardized incidence of MCC was 5.2 (men) and 3.8 (women) per million person-years. The 5-year relative survival was 58.8% (men) and 70.7% (women). Survival was lower among men than women in all age–sex groups and was highest for MCC of the upper extremity in both men (68.2%) and women (79.3%). The sex difference in survival is particularly due to the better survival of women with MCC of the head and neck. In terms of survival, the first two years are particularly critical. Conclusions: Our data validate the worse survival among men and highlights a more favorable prognosis for MCCs located on the limbs. The first two years after diagnosis of MCC are the years with the highest excess mortality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skin Cancer: Risk Factors and Prevention)
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16 pages, 4011 KiB  
Article
Conditional Knockout of N-WASP Enhanced the Formation of Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma Induced by KRasG12D
by Pazhanichamy Kalailingam, Apoorva Verma, Ying Hui Lee and Thirumaran Thanabalu
Cancers 2023, 15(18), 4455; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15184455 - 7 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is one of the most common forms of skin cancer in humans, and Neural Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (N-WASP) plays a crucial role in epidermal homeostasis. To elucidate the role of N-WASP in skin cancer, we generated mice which expressed [...] Read more.
Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is one of the most common forms of skin cancer in humans, and Neural Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (N-WASP) plays a crucial role in epidermal homeostasis. To elucidate the role of N-WASP in skin cancer, we generated mice which expressed constitutively active KRas (KRasG12D) in keratinocytes with either homozygous (N-WASPKOG12D) or heterozygous (N-WASPHetG12D) N-WASP knockout upon Tamoxifen (TAM) injection. Both the N-WASPKOG12D and N-WASPHetG12D mice had similar body weights and no congenital malformations prior to the injection of TAM. Within 2 weeks of the injections, the N-WASPKOG12D mice exhibited significant reductions in weight coupled with visible tumors at numerous sites, unlike the N-WASPHetG12D mice, which had no visible tumors. We found that both sets of mice had oily, sticky skin and wet eyes 3 weeks after their exposure to TAM, indicating the overproduction of sebum/meibum. At 37 days post TAM injection, several notable observations were made. Tumors collected from the N-WASPKOG12D mice had small- to large-sized keratin pearls that were not observed in the N-WASPHetG12D mice. A Western blot and immunostaining analysis both highlighted significantly higher levels of expression of SCC markers, such as the cytokeratins 8, 17, 18, and 19 and TP63, in the tumors of the N-WASPKOG12D mice compared to those of the latter group. Furthermore, we noted increases in the expression levels of EGFR, P-ERK, GLUT1, P-mTOR, and P-4EBP in the N-WASPKOG12D mice, suggesting that the deletion of N-WASP in the keratinocytes enhanced KRas signaling and glucose uptake, resulting in aggressive tumor formation. Interestingly, a thickening of the epidermal layer within the esophagus and tongue was only observed in the N-WASPKOG12D mice. Immunostaining for PCNA emphasized a significantly higher number of PCNA-positive cells in the skin of the N-WASPKOG12D mice compared to their counterparts, implying that epidermal thickening and enhanced tumorigenesis are due to an increased proliferation of keratinocytes. Through our results, we have established that N-WASP plays a tumor-suppressive role in skin cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skin Cancer: Risk Factors and Prevention)
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16 pages, 300 KiB  
Article
Global Tanning Bed Advertising: A Comparison of Legal Regulations on Three Continents
by Sonja Mathes, Karla S. Lindwedel, Lill Tove Nilsen, Isabelle Kaiser, Annette B. Pfahlberg and Olaf Gefeller
Cancers 2023, 15(17), 4362; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15174362 - 1 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Artificial ultraviolet radiation from tanning beds has been classified as carcinogenic by the International Agency for Research on Cancer in 2009. Several countries have subsequently introduced comprehensive legislation regulating commercial indoor tanning. Specific aspects of these regulations address tanning bed advertising and information [...] Read more.
Artificial ultraviolet radiation from tanning beds has been classified as carcinogenic by the International Agency for Research on Cancer in 2009. Several countries have subsequently introduced comprehensive legislation regulating commercial indoor tanning. Specific aspects of these regulations address tanning bed advertising and information requirements for tanning bed customers, which have been previously neglected in international comparisons of indoor tanning regulations. We performed a systematic search regarding legislation on these aspects in 131 legislative units across three continents (North America, Australia/New Zealand, Europe). The legal restrictions found varied widely in type and content. In 49 legislative units we identified total (n = 8) or partial legal bans (n = 41) on advertising for indoor tanning, while 64 legislative units enacted 5regulations that necessitate the dissemination of different types of specific health information to tanning bed customers. Nearly 40% of the legislative units of the study region lacked any legislation on these issues altogether. The heterogenous results emphasize the need for an international dialogue between health authorities and governments to harmonize the regulatory framework for tanning bed advertising and information requirements to a level better protecting the public from skin cancer. Our comprehensive international comparison can serve as a starting point for such a harmonization process that may ultimately protect the public worldwide from misleading tanning bed advertising. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skin Cancer: Risk Factors and Prevention)
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