Challenges and New Strategies in the Management of Pediatric Brain Tumors

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 3784

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
Interests: pediatric oncology; pediatric brain tumors; neuro-oncology; proton beam therapy; ion beam therapy; high-precision radiotherapy
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Guest Editor
Department of Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Einstein Cancer Center, Bronx, NY 10461, USA
Interests: neuro-oncology; primary brain tumors; cancer immunology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pediatric brain tumors present a unique set of challenges in terms of diagnosis, treatment and long-term outcome. The broad range of different tumor types is complex and heterogenous with regard to genetic mutations and biological behavior, making it difficult to identify optimal treatment strategies that are both safe and effective across all subtypes. Advances in personalized medicine, such as targeted therapy, immunotherapy or high-precision ion beam therapy, have increased the therapeutic window in these patients. This Special Issue aims to highlight the recent advances in the interdisciplinary management of pediatric brain tumor patients to further improve the outcomes of pediatric brain tumor patients, whilst minimizing the risk for long-term side effects.

We welcome Reviews and Original Articles on any aspect related to this topic.

Dr. Semi B. Harrabi
Prof. Dr. Adilia Hormigo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • low-grade glioma
  • high-grade glioma
  • ependymoma
  • medulloblastoma
  • craniopharyngioma
  • germinoma
  • molecular pathways
  • radiotherapy
  • targeted therapy
  • immunotherapy
  • neuroradiology
  • neurosurgery
  • new treatment strategies
  • long-term outcome

Published Papers (2 papers)

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21 pages, 1415 KiB  
Article
Proton Therapy for Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma
by Line Hoeltgen, Thomas Tessonnier, Eva Meixner, Philipp Hoegen, Ji-Young Kim, Maximilian Deng, Katharina Seidensaal, Thomas Held, Klaus Herfarth, Juergen Debus and Semi Harrabi
Cancers 2023, 15(20), 5022; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15205022 - 17 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1498
Abstract
Purpose: To provide the first report on proton radiotherapy (PRT) in the management of advanced nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) and evaluate potential benefits compared to conformal photon therapy (XRT). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 10 consecutive patients undergoing PRT for advanced JNA in a definitive [...] Read more.
Purpose: To provide the first report on proton radiotherapy (PRT) in the management of advanced nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) and evaluate potential benefits compared to conformal photon therapy (XRT). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 10 consecutive patients undergoing PRT for advanced JNA in a definitive or postoperative setting with a relative biological effectiveness weighted dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions between 2012 and 2022 at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center. Furthermore, dosimetric comparisons and risk estimations for short- and long-term radiation-induced complications between PRT plans and helical XRT plans were conducted. Results: PRT was well tolerated, with only low-grade acute toxicities (CTCAE I–II) being reported. The local control rate was 100% after a median follow-up of 27.0 (interquartile range 13.3–58.0) months. PRT resulted in considerable tumor shrinkage, leading to complete remission in five patients and bearing the potential to provide partial or complete symptom relief. Favorable dosimetric outcomes in critical brain substructures by the use of PRT translated into reduced estimated risks for neurocognitive impairment and radiation-induced CNS malignancies compared to XRT. Conclusions: PRT is an effective treatment option for advanced JNA with minimal acute morbidity and the potential for reduced radiation-induced long-term complications. Full article
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Review

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14 pages, 2264 KiB  
Review
Diffuse Midline Gliomas: Challenges and New Strategies in a Changing Clinical Landscape
by Umberto Tosi and Mark Souweidane
Cancers 2024, 16(1), 219; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16010219 - 2 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1697
Abstract
Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) was first described by Harvey Cushing, the father of modern neurosurgery, a century ago. Since then, the classification of this tumor changed significantly, as it is now part of the broader family of diffuse midline gliomas (DMGs), a [...] Read more.
Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) was first described by Harvey Cushing, the father of modern neurosurgery, a century ago. Since then, the classification of this tumor changed significantly, as it is now part of the broader family of diffuse midline gliomas (DMGs), a heterogeneous group of tumors of midline structures encompassing the entire rostro-caudal space, from the thalamus to the spinal cord. DMGs are characterized by various epigenetic events that lead to chromatin remodeling similarities, as two decades of studies made possible by increased tissue availability showed. This new understanding of tumor (epi)biology is now driving novel clinical trials that rely on targeted agents, with finally real hopes for a change in an otherwise unforgiving prognosis. This biological discovery is being paralleled with equally exciting work in therapeutic drug delivery. Invasive and noninvasive platforms have been central to early phase clinical trials with a promising safety track record and anecdotal benefits in outcome. Full article
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