High-Performance Concrete—Experimental Behavior and Structural Computational Modelling and Design

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 25546

Special Issue Editor

Civil Engineering Department, SCE – Shamoon College of Engineering, Beer Sheva, Israel
Interests: reinforced concrete; finite element modelling, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP); high-performance concrete (HPC); earthquake engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

High-performance concrete (HPC) refers generally to concrete with higher durability and structural properties compared to normal-strength concrete (NSC). The advantages of HPC for constructing buildings and bridges are many; however, the structural behaviour of HPC can be different from NSC. Thus, designing structural HPC elements is not a trivial matter and requires special knowledge and data that are not always available.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present the state-of-the-art research performed on the structural behaviour of HPC including experimental results, computational modelling, case studies, design aspects, and comprehensive review papers. This Special Issue will provide the engineering community with a collection of high-quality and peer-reviewed papers addressing different aspects of the structural behaviour of HPC.

Dr. Rami Eid
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • High-performance concrete (HPC)
  • High-strength concrete (HSC)
  • Ultra-high-strength concrete (UHSC)
  • Fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC)
  • Seismic behavior
  • Ductility
  • Structural/mechanical properties
  • Impact resistance
  • Tall buildings
  • Long-term behavior

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 14535 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study on the Shear Behavior of Reinforced Highly Ductile Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams with Stirrups
by Min Zhang, Mingke Deng, Jiasheng Yang and Yangxi Zhang
Buildings 2022, 12(8), 1264; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12081264 - 18 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1384
Abstract
The aim of this study is to improve the shear behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with stirrups by using highly ductile fiber-reinforced concrete (HDC), which is a fiber-reinforced cement-based composite material with tensile-strain-hardening properties. Twelve reinforced HDC (RHDC) beams and three RC [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to improve the shear behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with stirrups by using highly ductile fiber-reinforced concrete (HDC), which is a fiber-reinforced cement-based composite material with tensile-strain-hardening properties. Twelve reinforced HDC (RHDC) beams and three RC beams with stirrups were tested under a concentrated load. The experimental parameters involved the shear span to effective depth ratio, stirrup ratio, and longitudinal reinforcement ratio. The results revealed that the mode of failure of RHDC beams, which exhibited better ductility than RC beams, included diagonal compression, shear compression, diagonal tension, and flexural shear failure. RHDC beams exhibited stable multiple crack propagation behavior and satisfactory integrity, thus showing that HDC effectively restricted the development of shear cracks and improved the damage resistance of beams. Compared with RC beams, the shear strength, displacement ductility factor, and deflection-clear span ratios corresponding to the peak load and ultimate deflection increased by up to 30.5%, 44.9%, 150.0%, and 148.0%, respectively. RHDC beams exhibited higher residual strength and deformation capacity than RC beams, thus indicating that HDC significantly improved the brittle shear failure mode. Specimens H-1 and H-2 exhibited the largest improvement in shear strength and displacement ductility factor, respectively, compared with RC beams. The shear strength of RHDC beams increased as the shear span to effective depth ratio decreased. For RHDC beams with the same shear span to effective depth ratio, the shear strength increased with the increase in the longitudinal reinforcement ratio and stirrup ratio under shear compression failure. Full article
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15 pages, 2973 KiB  
Article
Mechanical Properties of Ultra-High Performance Concrete with Partial Utilization of Waste Foundry Sand
by Piotr Smarzewski
Buildings 2020, 10(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10010011 - 14 Jan 2020
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 5262
Abstract
Waste foundry sand (WFS) is a ferrous and non-ferrous foundry industry by-product, produced in the amount of approximately 700 thousand tons annually in Poland and it is estimated that only a small percentage of this waste is recycled. The study used WFS to [...] Read more.
Waste foundry sand (WFS) is a ferrous and non-ferrous foundry industry by-product, produced in the amount of approximately 700 thousand tons annually in Poland and it is estimated that only a small percentage of this waste is recycled. The study used WFS to produce ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) as a partial substitute for quartz sand. It was replaced with WFS levels of 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% by weight of quartz sand content. The UHPC mixtures were produced and tested to determine the compressive strength, flexural strength, splitting tensile strength as well as the modulus of elasticity at 28, 56, and 112 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was done to identify the presence of various compounds and micro-cracks in UHPC with WFS. The results revealed an increase as well as an insignificant decrease in the mechanical properties up to 5% and 10% WFS replacement, respectively. These studies also prove improvement in the microstructure of UHPC up to a 5% WFS level. In all the tested properties in this work, 5% WFS was found to be an apt substitute for quartz sand. Full article
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11 pages, 6208 KiB  
Article
High-Strength Concrete Circular Columns with TRC-TSR Dual Internal Confinement
by Rami Eid, Avi Cohen, Reuven Guma, Eliav Ifrach, Netanel Levi and Avidor Zvi
Buildings 2019, 9(10), 218; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9100218 - 14 Oct 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 7367
Abstract
The standard requirements for transverse steel reinforcement (TSR) confinement in reinforced-concrete (RC) columns are mainly to provide the following: ductile behavior, minimum axial load capacity of the column’s core, and prevention of longitudinal bars buckling. It is well-known that the passive confinement due [...] Read more.
The standard requirements for transverse steel reinforcement (TSR) confinement in reinforced-concrete (RC) columns are mainly to provide the following: ductile behavior, minimum axial load capacity of the column’s core, and prevention of longitudinal bars buckling. It is well-known that the passive confinement due the TSR action is less effective in high-strength concrete (HSC) compared to normal-strength concrete (NSC). Therefore, the TSR amounts required by the standards for HSC columns are high, and in some cases, especially in the lower stories columns of high-rise buildings, are impractical. This paper presents a new construction method using textile-reinforced concrete (TRC) as internal confinement together with reduced TSR amounts. Moreover, comparison of the proposed method with RC columns casted in fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) stay-in-place forms as additional external confinement, is presented. Eleven large-scale column specimens were tested under axial compression. The results give an insight on the application feasibility of the proposed construction method. It is shown that the TRC-TSR dual internal confinement action can be an option to reduce the standard required TSR amounts while maintaining similar levels of ductile behavior. Full article
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13 pages, 2595 KiB  
Article
Shear Strength of Geopolymer Concrete Beams Using High Calcium Content Fly Ash in a Marine Environment
by Muhammad Sigit Darmawan, Ridho Bayuaji, Hidajat Sugihardjo, Nur Ahmad Husin and Raden Buyung Anugraha Affandhie
Buildings 2019, 9(4), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9040098 - 23 Apr 2019
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 4687
Abstract
This paper deals with the behavior of a geopolymer concrete beam (GCB) under shear load using high calcium content fly ash (FA). The effect of the marine environment on the shear strength of GCB was considered by curing the specimen in a sea [...] Read more.
This paper deals with the behavior of a geopolymer concrete beam (GCB) under shear load using high calcium content fly ash (FA). The effect of the marine environment on the shear strength of GCB was considered by curing the specimen in a sea splashing zone for 28 days. Destructive and non-destructive tests were carried out to determine the properties of geopolymer concrete in different curing environments. Geopolymer concretes cured at room temperature showed higher compressive strength, slightly lower porosity, and higher concrete resistivity than that of those cured in sea water. From the loading test of the GCB under shear load, there was no effect of a sea environment on the crack pattern and crack development of the beam. The shear strength of the GCB generally exceeded the predicted shear strength based on the American Concrete Institute (ACI) Code. Full article
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14 pages, 3344 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Concrete Strength Made with Recycled Aggregate
by Haitham Al Ajmani, Ferass Suleiman, Ismail Abuzayed and Adil Tamimi
Buildings 2019, 9(3), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9030056 - 01 Mar 2019
Cited by 39 | Viewed by 5935
Abstract
The construction industry consumes enormous quantities of concrete, which subsequently produces large amount of material waste during production and demolishing. As a result, the colossal quantity of concrete rubble is disposed in landfills. This paper, therefore, evaluated the feasibility of reusing waste concrete [...] Read more.
The construction industry consumes enormous quantities of concrete, which subsequently produces large amount of material waste during production and demolishing. As a result, the colossal quantity of concrete rubble is disposed in landfills. This paper, therefore, evaluated the feasibility of reusing waste concrete as recycled aggregate (RA) to produce concrete. The replacement levels were 20, 50, and 80% RA of normal coarse aggregate. Micro silica (MS) and fly ash (FA) were used as cementitious replacement material, however, the water-to-binder ratio (w/b) was kept constant at 0.31. A total of 44 specimens were used to evaluate the fresh and hardened properties. Concrete with 80% RA showed good workability and mechanical properties. The compressive strength of the concrete with 80% RA was 60 MPa at 28 days and 77 MPa at 56 days. Rapid chloride penetration test (RCPT) was also conducted, where the concrete with 80% RA had the lowest permeability. Full article
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