Sustainable Buildings, Resilient Cities and Infrastructure Systems

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2024) | Viewed by 6661

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Technical Education Department, Uttar Pradesh (Under Government of Uttar Pradesh), Kanpur 208024, India
Interests: green buildings; renewable energy harvesting; energy efficiency in buildings; sustainable mobility; mechanical vibration; design of dynamic systems & tribology

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Guest Editor
Scientist-Centre for Climate Change & Building Energy Efficiency Division, Assistant Professor-Academy of Scientific & Innovative Research CSIR-Central Building Research Institute, Ministry of Science and Technology, Government of India, Roorkee 247667, India
Interests: building energy efficiency; net zero energy buildings; solar thermal power; thermal conductivity; two-phase flow; indoor air quality; energy conversion; geothermal

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Guest Editors are inviting submissions to a Special Issue of Buildings on the subject area of “Sustainable Buildings, Resilient Cities and Infrastructure Systems”. Global warming, climate change, and GHG emissions are the major concern for all countries nowadays. Major contributors to climate change are: greenhouse gases (GHGs) and CO2, released mainly through the burning of fossil fuels. Around the globe, building sector play a major role in CO2 emission. The building sector alone is accountable for approximately 40% of global energy consumption, consequently escalating CO2 emissions. These rising consumption trends have evolved into a serious concern toward improving energy efficiency in the building sector.

The main objective of this Special Issue is to highlight the importance of sustainable buildings, building energy efficiency, and green intelligent infrastructure systems. The main focus has been given to net zero energy buildings (NZEB), a one-step solution to mitigate carbon footprint and greenhouse gas emissions, and moving the building sector toward a sustainable future. The potential of renewable energy, such as solar and wind, is inevitable for the building sector. The present Special Issue covers the integration of various technological advancements in the field of renewable energy technologies for sustainable infrastructure.

The Guest Editors of this Special Issue, therefore, encourage scientists, researchers, academics, and industry professionals to present their latest findings concerning the technological advancement in following fields:  

  • Policies and infrastructure requirement for green buildings;
  • Building performance prediction and optimization;
  • Energy planning and thermal comfort in buildings;
  • Policies on sustainable infrastructure systems;
  • Future integrated mobility-energy systems in resilient cities;
  • Social, economic, and environmental issues associated with resilient cities;
  • Emerging trends in smart green building technologies;
  • Sustainable materials;
  • Photovoltaics module technology for sustainable buildings;
  • Data mining techniques in green building for evaluation of cost, grades, and adoption.

Editors strongly welcome articles from different application areas of buildings for publication in this Special Issue.

Dr. Ashwani Kumar
Dr. Chandan Swaroop Meena
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • net zero energy buildings
  • green technology
  • efficient use of energy in buildings
  • policy for energy efficient infrastructure
  • thermal energy storage
  • thermoeconomics
  • new energy technology for buildings
  • application of AI & ML in building sector
  • building energy supply
  • sustainable construction and resilient cities

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 2603 KiB  
Article
Modeling the Environmental Impact of Passenger Cars Driven on Hilly Roads in Austria: A More Accurate Valuation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Further Environmental Indicators for Integral Life Cycle Assessments of Road Infrastructures
by Lukas Hausberger, Jounes Lutterbach and Florian Gschösser
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 263; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010263 - 18 Jan 2024
Viewed by 935
Abstract
Previous studies of road or railway infrastructures have shown that traffic emissions outweigh the environmental impacts of the product stage and construction stage over the entire life cycle. Traffic usage is therefore the main emitter over the life cycle (A1–C4). Due to the [...] Read more.
Previous studies of road or railway infrastructures have shown that traffic emissions outweigh the environmental impacts of the product stage and construction stage over the entire life cycle. Traffic usage is therefore the main emitter over the life cycle (A1–C4). Due to the small number of sustainability assessment systems, the question of how to consider traffic emissions in detail in an integral life cycle assessment has arisen. This study examines Austrian car traffic and investigates environmental impacts beyond the scope of carbon dioxide and particulate matter. The results were determined for a selection of common impact indicators. In addition to driving in flat terrain, an approach is presented that enables the evaluation of emissions due uphill and downhill driving. Thus, route options and route closures/detours due to maintenance work can be evaluated in a simple way. During the analyses, a traffic calculator was developed, which can currently assess different cars depending on the route specifics (flat/hill). The tool can be expanded to include other road vehicles (buses, trucks, motorcycles) and trains as well. This will simplify evaluations and decision-making processes and provide optimal support for a future-proof sustainable built environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Buildings, Resilient Cities and Infrastructure Systems)
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22 pages, 4298 KiB  
Article
Utilization of Solar Energy for Water Heating Application to Improve Building Energy Efficiency: An Experimental Study
by Chandan Swaroop Meena, Amit Nandan Prajapati, Ashwani Kumar and Manoj Kumar
Buildings 2022, 12(12), 2166; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12122166 - 7 Dec 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2012
Abstract
The manuscript is written for flow escalation based on an experimental data for a Solar Assisted Heat Pump Water Heater (SAHPWH) increasing building energy efficiency. For the investigation, a Solar Assisted Heat Pump (SAHP) was conceived, manufactured, and tested in real time. The [...] Read more.
The manuscript is written for flow escalation based on an experimental data for a Solar Assisted Heat Pump Water Heater (SAHPWH) increasing building energy efficiency. For the investigation, a Solar Assisted Heat Pump (SAHP) was conceived, manufactured, and tested in real time. The findings of the experiments shows that single glazing with average sun radiation of 600–750 W/m2, COP of approx. 6 can be obtained with identical heat gains. This study shows that when a flat plate collector of area 1.83 m (L) × 1.22 m (W) × 0.1 m (T) with a 0.5-mm-thick black copper plate absorber with clear glazing as a cover receives average radiation of 700 W/m2, then setup can supply 60 litres of water for residential use from 15 °C to 45 °C in approx. 70 min. In addition, the study finds that the collector efficiency factor F’ is likewise shown to have a direct connection with the absorber and an inverse relationship of tube spacing. The findings indicated that the technology has significant commercial potential, particularly in sectors such as with solar resources for improving building energy efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Buildings, Resilient Cities and Infrastructure Systems)
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Review

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16 pages, 466 KiB  
Review
Recent Advancements in Augmentation of Solar Water Heaters Using Nanocomposites with PCM: Past, Present, and Future
by Pravesh Kr. Kushwaha, Neelesh Kr. Sharma, Ashwani Kumar and Chandan Swaroop Meena
Buildings 2023, 13(1), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13010079 - 29 Dec 2022
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 2798
Abstract
Energy consumption in India is massive, and even the quantity used for household tasks is substantial. The majority of the requirement is satisfied by using fossil fuels, which are the traditional methods. Heating water is the most frequent home application. Accordingly, this article [...] Read more.
Energy consumption in India is massive, and even the quantity used for household tasks is substantial. The majority of the requirement is satisfied by using fossil fuels, which are the traditional methods. Heating water is the most frequent home application. Accordingly, this article examines studies from the previous ten years. The information in this article demonstrates that using renewable energy is the greatest way to cut back on both the use of fossil fuels and carbon emissions while heating water for residential use. Solar, hydroelectric, wind, and biofuels are the most significant renewable sources for improving building efficiency that can be used for an extended period of time. The solar water heater is a common example of how solar energy is being used in homes more frequently. In order to identify key issues and solutions related to employing solar water heaters as an effective water heating application in both commercial and residential buildings, this article compiles research data from earlier studies (2012–2022). The literature survey was carried out using Scopus, a specialized database. Sixty-six dedicated research publications having search keywords plus recently published articles that matched the inclusion criteria were chosen for this review study. The study’s findings show that there is a greater inclination of researchers towards research and development in the field of domestic solar water heaters. The research publications that are being presented are all from the past 10 years (2012–2022) and stress the use of solar energy in increasing building efficiency. The study highlights how flat plate solar collectors with distilled water as the heat transfer fluid and a phase-changing substance as the thermal energy storage could potentially be enhanced. The thermal conductivity of paraffin wax and distilled water was improved by 75% of the researchers by using 0.05 to 0.5% concentrations of Al and Cu oxide nanoparticles, making it useful in solar water heaters. A total of 78% of researchers are interested in domestic water heating applications since they use a lot of energy in both urban and rural settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Buildings, Resilient Cities and Infrastructure Systems)
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