Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series: Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems III

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2023) | Viewed by 4205

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Mechanical, University of La Rochelle, LaSIE UMR CNRS 7356, 17000 La Rochelle, France
Interests: heat and mass transfer; porous media; building energy performance; urban microclimate
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Design, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
Interests: sleep quality; work performance; thermal comfort; indoor environmental quality

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Department of the Natural and Built Environment, College of Social Sciences and Arts, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK
Interests: building performance; building simulation; energy efficiency; environmental and biomimetic architecture; indoor environmental quality; sustainable building technologies; solar energy; smart buildings and cities

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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Brunel University London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, UK
Interests: building information modeling (BIM); machine learning; green buildings; green infrastructures; sustainability; life-cycle energy and environmental assessment (LCA); environmental policy impact assessment sustainable & smart city; transport policy; transport behavior and network modeling; energy & environmental economics; carbon neutrality; sustainable and smart materials; climate change adaptation
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Guest Editor
Department of Building Environment and Services, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Interests: indoor air quality; building energy; building environment; ventilation; HVAC system

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a new Collection titled “Editorial Board Members Collection Series: "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems" ”, which will collect papers invited by the Editorial Board Members.

The aim of this Collection is to provide a venue for networking and communication between Buildings and scholars in the field of Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems. All papers will be published in open access following peer review.

Prof. Dr. Rafik Belarbi
Prof. Dr. Li Lan
Dr. Karam M. Al-Obaidi
Dr. Muhammad Shafique
Prof. Dr. Xinke Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • building energy
  • building environment
  • building physics
  • building systems

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 17235 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Window Placement on Natural Ventilation Capability in a Jakarta High-Rise Building Unit
by Chely Novia Bramiana, Asrul Mahjuddin Ressang Aminuddin, Muhammad Azzam Ismail, Ratih Widiastuti and Previari Umi Pramesti
Buildings 2023, 13(5), 1141; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13051141 - 25 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2373
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the natural ventilation potential in an apartment unit in a high-rise building. A corner unit of a two-bedroom apartment was selected for this study, where single-sided and cross ventilation occurred in the unit. This study [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the natural ventilation potential in an apartment unit in a high-rise building. A corner unit of a two-bedroom apartment was selected for this study, where single-sided and cross ventilation occurred in the unit. This study employed a CFD simulation to model the indoor airflow of an apartment unit in West Jakarta. The units were modelled and simulated using CFD with a RANS k-ε turbulence model. The results were validated with the readings from the field measurements that had been conducted. Based on CFD results, the window position influences indoor airflow. In the case of cross ventilation, a windward opening is more beneficial, while in single-sided ventilation, a leeward opening creates more indoor airflow. Therefore, it is recommended that the characteristic of window design be considered in the early design stage not only to improve indoor air quality but also to maintain privacy and safety measures. Full article
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19 pages, 4561 KiB  
Article
Experimental Investigation of Indoor Thermal Comfort under Different Heating Conditions in Winter
by Zhaosong Fang, Zhisheng Guo, Weibin Chen, Huijun Wu and Zhimin Zheng
Buildings 2022, 12(12), 2232; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12122232 - 15 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1245
Abstract
Owing to historical reasons, only a few locations in the Guangdong province use heating to enhance interior thermal conditions. With the variation in climate and increase in people’s lifestyle requirements, winter heating has become increasingly necessary. However, a literature review revealed that only [...] Read more.
Owing to historical reasons, only a few locations in the Guangdong province use heating to enhance interior thermal conditions. With the variation in climate and increase in people’s lifestyle requirements, winter heating has become increasingly necessary. However, a literature review revealed that only a few studies have investigated the heating requirements during winter in the Guangdong province. In this study, we compared the thermal comfort of radiant floor heating with wall-mounted air conditioner heating. A Guangzhou University climate chamber was used in several investigations. The findings revealed that the thermal neutral temperatures of radiant heating and air conditioner heating were 22.0 °C and 23.0 °C, respectively, about 1 °C variation in temperature. Additionally, in the research on thermal reactions and local skin temperature measurements, the impact of local thermal discomfort on the overall thermal experience was also considered. The findings showed a direct relationship between the local thermal discomfort caused by radiant heating and general thermal sensation. Thermal sensation of the subjects mainly originated from the lower extremities and was significantly affected by Va (air velocity). The relationship between the local thermal discomfort of convective heating and general thermal sensation was weak and mainly caused by the uneven thermal environment. Thus, in south China, for lowering energy usage, radiant floor heating should be used to create an improved indoor thermal environment in winter. Full article
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