The Dynamic In Situ Characterisation of Buildings

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 1704

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
UCL Energy Institute, Bartlett School of Environment Energy and Resources, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
Interests: buildings and energy; buildings thermal performance; building monitoring; dynamic heat transfer; energy data; operational performance; retrofit

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Guest Editor
UCL Energy Institute, Bartlett School of Environment Energy and Resources, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
Interests: buildings and energy; thermal performance; performance gap; dynamic performance; demand side response; ventilation

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Guest Editor
UCL Energy Institute, Bartlett School of Environment Energy and Resources, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
Interests: energy and buildings; physical characterisation of buildings (PCB)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The decarbonisation of the built environment is a critical component of our path to net zero. Conventional approaches to understanding the performance of buildings are mostly static, addressing average conditions and thermal performance. However, real buildings are subject to varying external conditions, including temperatures, wind and solar gains and internal factors, which can all be highly variable, involving factors such as heating system use, ventilation and occupancy. There is increasing interest in the dynamic performance and conditions in buildings, relating both to the conditions experienced and the demands on the energy system, with implications for the integration of less flexible generation and requirements for demand side response.

This Special Issue will bring together research that characterises the in situ dynamic performance of buildings (both domestic and non-domestic) and the systems within them that provide heating, cooling and ventilation. It aims to include research which supports our transition to net zero by including a range of perspectives and complementary topics. Research that addresses the dynamic thermal performance of buildings, the temperatures within them and the resulting energy demands are all welcome contributions. The Special Issue will also include research that addresses the characteristics and performance of energy systems within buildings, set in the context of the fabric, ventilation and occupant factors, and the interaction between these systems and the wider energy system. Finally, it is essential to ensure that buildings meet the needs of occupants (comfort, ventilation, environmental quality), particularly as energy prices rise and new business models such as time-of-use tariffs emerge.  Papers related to these themes are also welcome.

We are aware of the breadth of exciting and insightful research which relates to this Special Issue and look forward to reading your contribution.

Dr. Virginia Gori
Prof. Dr. Cliff Elwell
Dr. Frances Hollick
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • building physics
  • buildings and energy
  • dynamic thermal performance
  • demand side response
  • building flexibility
  • building systems
  • in situ building characterisation
  • thermal comfort
  • domestic and non-domestic buildings
  • ventilation in buildings

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 2763 KiB  
Article
Party Wall Behaviour and Impact in QUB and Coheating Tests
by Mark Collett, Adam Hardy, Johann Meulemans and David Glew
Buildings 2023, 13(11), 2877; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13112877 - 17 Nov 2023
Viewed by 565
Abstract
In situ measurement can enable accurate evaluation of a building’s as-built performance. However, when measuring whole house performance, party walls introduce measurement uncertainty. Subsequently, it is common to “adjust” measurements to isolate heat transfer through party walls. This study explores the behaviour and [...] Read more.
In situ measurement can enable accurate evaluation of a building’s as-built performance. However, when measuring whole house performance, party walls introduce measurement uncertainty. Subsequently, it is common to “adjust” measurements to isolate heat transfer through party walls. This study explores the behaviour and impact of party walls in QUB and coheating measurements of a semi-detached house, presenting empirical evidence on the validity of these measurements where a party wall is present. Two different party wall heat transfer behaviours were observed through heat flux density measurements. Thermal charging is apparent in QUB tests and the initial stages of coheating. After 48 h of coheating, the party wall has become heat saturated and exhibits stable heat transfer. Consequently, using heat flux density measurements to isolate party wall heat transfer in QUB tests, where thermal saturation has not been achieved, can result in misleading inferences. The coheating and QUB measurements without party wall adjustment are in close agreement, irrespective of differing heating patterns in the neighbouring property. The generalisation of these findings is problematic since they describe the impact of the case study-specific built form and the test conditions. Future work to explore the impact of built form and test conditions is needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Dynamic In Situ Characterisation of Buildings)
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14 pages, 5387 KiB  
Article
A Model Calibration Approach to U-Value Measurements with Thermography
by Dhruvkumar Patel, Jacob Estevam Schmiedt, Marc Röger and Bernhard Hoffschmidt
Buildings 2023, 13(9), 2253; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13092253 - 05 Sep 2023
Viewed by 772
Abstract
The thermal properties of a building envelope are key indicators of the energy performance of the building. Therefore, methods are needed to determine quantities like the thermal transmittance (U-value) or heat capacitance in a fast, reliable way and with as little impact on [...] Read more.
The thermal properties of a building envelope are key indicators of the energy performance of the building. Therefore, methods are needed to determine quantities like the thermal transmittance (U-value) or heat capacitance in a fast, reliable way and with as little impact on the use of the building as possible. In this paper a technique is proposed that relies on a simplified electrical analogical model of building envelope components which can cover their dynamic thermal behavior. The parameters of this model are optimized to produce the best fit between simulated and measured outside surface temperatures. As the temperatures can be measured remotely with an infrared camera this approach requires significantly less installation effort and intrusion in the building than other methods. At the same time, a single measurement provides data for a large range of locations on a facade or a roof. The paper describes the method and a first experimental implementation of it. The experiment indicates that this method has the potential to produce results which have an accuracy that is comparable to standardized reference methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Dynamic In Situ Characterisation of Buildings)
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