Recent Scientific Developments in Building Envelope Materials

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 5485

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Construction Research Center, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada
Interests: building envelope materials; service life prediction; aging and durability; long-term performance assessment; sustainability and resiliency; climate resilient retrofit; failure analysis
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Interests: surface and bulk modifications of cellulosic materials; sustainable building envelopes; natural fiber-reinforced composites

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The building envelope is an essential building component that serves to provide a comfortable and healthy indoor environment. It is a multi-layered passive construction element and contains both structural and non-structural components designed to protect the building occupants from the vagaries of the weather. The properly designed building envelope should protect the building and its contents from climatic loads, provide adequate comfort to residents, ensure the building is energy efficient, and maintain its performance over its intended service life. On-going scientific development of building envelope materials plays a critical role, not only towards ensuring compliance with codes and standards, but also to meet expected performance challenges arising from a changing climate and to fulfill their expected service life. Failure in satisfying functional performance requirements can lead to premature degradation of the building envelope, costly repairs, and health and safety risks to occupants. Moreover, scientific developments of building envelope materials are now needed to encourage low-carbon construction solutions. This Special Issue is intended to provide a platform for multidisciplinary researchers to highlight their contributions focused on the most recent developments in building envelope materials to achieve a sustainable and low-carbon future.

Dr. Marzieh Riahinezhad
Dr. Reza Foruzanmehr
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy-efficient and sustainable building envelope materials
  • climate-resiliency
  • durability and aging management
  • service life prediction
  • low-carbon building envelope materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3020 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Thermal Comfort with and without Fill Using a Thermal Environment Analysis Method for Building Envelopes with Thermally Complex Geometry: A Case Study in Hokkaido, Japan
by Tatsuhiro Yamamoto
Buildings 2023, 13(7), 1646; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13071646 - 28 Jun 2023
Viewed by 670
Abstract
Recently, the number of buildings with curved surfaces has been increasing. Although these buildings are not complex from a design perspective, they are thermally complex from an environmental engineering perspective. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a tool used in environmental engineering analysis that [...] Read more.
Recently, the number of buildings with curved surfaces has been increasing. Although these buildings are not complex from a design perspective, they are thermally complex from an environmental engineering perspective. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a tool used in environmental engineering analysis that requires advanced analysis techniques. Its analysis load is high, making its use impractical in design. Therefore, a coupled analysis method was developed using the two-dimensional heat flow calculation tool Hygrabe, energy simulation, and CFD. Using this method, the environmental analysis of a building with fill in Hokkaido, Japan, was performed and the accuracy of the analysis was verified. The results of the coupled analysis model were used to evaluate thermal insulation performance. The high thermostability of the fill contributes to the high degree of freedom of the exterior skin and is highly useful for design. The results show that the thermal performance of the building envelope with and without fill did not change the insulation performance. The results for January 15 were below −3.0 °C for all insulation performance levels but higher than the outside air temperature during the night. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Scientific Developments in Building Envelope Materials)
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15 pages, 1896 KiB  
Article
Pre-Compressed Foam Sealing Tapes to Seal Joints between Building Envelope Components Watertight: An Experimental Assessment
by Stéphanie Van Linden and Nathan Van Den Bossche
Buildings 2023, 13(3), 661; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13030661 - 2 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1298
Abstract
Currently there is gaining interest in pre-compressed foam sealing tapes to seal joints watertight between different building envelope components. Little to no information is available on the parameters affecting the resistance of these foam tapes to driving rain. On the other hand, several [...] Read more.
Currently there is gaining interest in pre-compressed foam sealing tapes to seal joints watertight between different building envelope components. Little to no information is available on the parameters affecting the resistance of these foam tapes to driving rain. On the other hand, several research studies have shown that water leakages can be expected at relatively low-pressure differences and that drainage should be provided. Therefore, a study was designed to on the one hand assess the material and installation parameters that affect the watertightness of pre-compressed polyurethane foam sealing tapes impregnated with an acrylic polymer dispersion and on the other hand evaluate the potential of providing drainage possibilities, either as a two-barrier system or by means of integrated drainage cavities. It was found that the joint width, the presence of an airtight coating, and the position of the tape relative to the exterior surface affected the watertightness of the sealed joints. Notably, 87% of the evaluated foam tapes applied as a single barrier showed water leakages at pressure differences of 600 Pa or lower. Foam tapes with integrated drainage cavities, on the other hand, resulted in watertight joints up to an average pressure difference of 825 Pa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Scientific Developments in Building Envelope Materials)
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16 pages, 3421 KiB  
Article
Cementitious Insulated Drywall Panels Reinforced with Kraft-Paper Honeycomb Structures
by Sepideh Shahbazi, Nicholas Singer, Muslim Majeed, Miroslava Kavgic and Reza Foruzanmehr
Buildings 2022, 12(8), 1261; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12081261 - 17 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2715
Abstract
Standard building practices commonly use gypsum-based drywall panels on the interior wall and ceiling applications as a partition to protect the components of a wall assembly from moisture and fire to uphold the building code and ensure safety standards. Unfortunately, gypsum-based drywall panels [...] Read more.
Standard building practices commonly use gypsum-based drywall panels on the interior wall and ceiling applications as a partition to protect the components of a wall assembly from moisture and fire to uphold the building code and ensure safety standards. Unfortunately, gypsum-based drywall panels have poor resistance to water and are susceptible to mold growth in humid climates. Furthermore, the accumulation of drywall in landfills can result in toxic leachate impacting the surrounding environment. A proposed solution to the pitfalls of gypsum-based drywall arises in its substitution with a new lightweight composite honeycomb sandwich panel. This study aimed to develop sandwich panels with improvements in flexural strength and thermal insulating properties through the combined use of cementitious binder mix and kraft-paper honeycomb structures. The proposed alternative is created by following standard practices outlined in ASTM C305 to create cement panels and experimenting with admixtures to improve the material performance in order to cater to a drywall panel application. The kraft-paper honeycomb structure is bonded to cured cementitious panels to create a composite “sandwich panel” assembly. The results indicate that the sample flexural strength performed well after 7 days and exhibited superior flexural strength at 28 days, while providing a substantial increase in R-value of 5.84 m2K/W when compared to gypsum-based panels, with an R-value of 5.41 m2K/W. In addition, the reinforced kraft-paper honeycomb with a thick core and addition of flax fibres to the cementitious boards possesses better thermal conductivity, with a reduction of 42%, a lower density, and a lower water vapour transmission in comparison to the thin kraft-paper honeycomb sandwich panel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Scientific Developments in Building Envelope Materials)
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