Novel Approaches for the Mitigation of Climate Change and Extreme Events Impact on Structures and Infrastructures

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 2770

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Architecture, Technology and Engineering, University of Brighton, Brighton BN2 4GJ, UK
Interests: stochastic mechanics; vibration control; ground motion modeling; soil-structure-interaction; vibrating barriers

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Guest Editor

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Guest Editor
School of Architecture, Technology and Engineering, University of Brighton, Brighton BN2 4GJ, UK
Interests: strengthening of existing structures; structural resilience; earthquake engineering; cement-free concrete; ultra high performance fibre reinforced concrete
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The extraordinary challenges that climate change poses to our existing and new structures and infrastructures is a growing concern that is being widely discussed worldwide. The uncertainty in future environmental actions and the aging of existing structures and infrastructures in addition to the continuously increasing demand for resources compel us to adopt novel approaches to tackle the impact caused by climate change and extreme events.

This Special Issue aims to collect ground-breaking research and novel strategies to mitigate the impact of climate change and extreme events on structures and infrastructures. In this regard, submissions underpinning the following list of topics are particularly welcomed:

  • Modelling of actions induced by Climate Change and extreme events
  • Multi-hazard vulnerability assessment and risk analysis
  • Aging of structures and infrastructures
  • Novel techniques for the repair and strengthening of existing structures and infrastructures
  • Innovative approaches for structural rehabilitation
  • Sustainable high-performance materials for enhanced resilience
  • Novel devices for the control of existing structures

Dr. Pierfrancesco Cacciola
Prof. Dr. Bruno Briseghella
Dr. Andreas Lampropoulos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • structural reabilitation
  • extreme environments
  • aging of structures
  • multi-hazard
  • structural resilience
  • sustainability

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

29 pages, 4331 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Performance Indicators of a Large-Span Reinforced Concrete Arch Bridge in a Multi-Hazard Environment
by Marija Kušter Marić, Ana Mandić Ivanković, Mladen Srbić and Dominik Skokandić
Buildings 2022, 12(7), 1046; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12071046 - 19 Jul 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1834
Abstract
Assessment of a single bridge and management system for all bridges in the network is still a major challenge, although much research has been carried out and implemented in existing networks over the last four decades. This paper presents a case study of [...] Read more.
Assessment of a single bridge and management system for all bridges in the network is still a major challenge, although much research has been carried out and implemented in existing networks over the last four decades. This paper presents a case study of a long-span arch bridge, the Maslenica Motorway Bridge, located in a multi-hazard maritime environment. Although special attention was paid to durability during design, the bridge required repair after 20 years of operation. The analysis includes an overview of the design project, structural health monitoring during construction and operation, numerous laboratory and in-situ testing, numerical analysis of structural capacity and remaining service life, and meteorological monitoring of the bridge site. A new approach to bridge assessment is presented that includes not only a deterioration index, but five groups of key performance indicators: (1) safety, reliability, and security; (2) availability and maintainability; (3) costs; (4) the environment; and (5) health and politics. Incorporating all available data and evaluating various aspects of bridge performance provides greater insight into the condition of the bridge, not only at the structure level but also at the network level. The method is applied to the reinforced concrete arch bridge in a harsh maritime environment and evaluation is provided based on the comprehensive data analysis. The key performance assessment procedure and lessons learned from this case study can be applied to a wide range of structures. Full article
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