Interactions of Chemicals with Building Materials

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2023) | Viewed by 6491

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University, 166 07 Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: ecotoxicology; biodegradation of building materials; chemistry

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University, Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: materials engineering; wood products; adhesives; constructions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Building materials are in close contact with various chemical substances for their protection or improvement of their chemical, physical, and mechanical properties and application in practice. Research on such interactions has exhibited dynamic progress in recent years. Some commercial or developmental chemical mixtures can lead to protection against biological agents, fires, corrosion, and weather effects but could conversely lead to an increase in the levels of various metals or organic chemicals in nature. For this reason, this Special Issue of Buildings deals research on chemical substances, the incorporation of natural or artificial components into materials, development of ecofriendly building materials, and the use of methods for chemical analyses in the building environment. The protection of historical monuments requires advanced solutions, and therefore, related works are encouraged. Original research (theoretical and experimental), case studies, and comprehensive review papers are invited for possible publication in this Special Issue. Relevant topics for this Special Issue include but are not limited to the following subjects:

  • Biodegradation
  • Biocides
  • Ecotoxicity
  • Toxicity
  • Protective potential of developed substances and mixtures
  • Life cycle assessment of building materials
  • Coatings
  • Adhesives
  • Varnishes
  • Chemical methods for evaluation of inorganic and organic substances in building materials
  • Chemical compounds released from building materials
  • Waste materials in advanced building materials

Dr. Klára Kobetičová
Dr. Martin Böhm
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • chemical substances
  • biodegradation
  • protection of buildings
  • surface treatment of building materials
  • LCA
  • toxicity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 4971 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Casein Protein Admixture on Pore Size Distribution and Mechanical Properties of Lime-Metakaolin Paste
by Przemysław Brzyski, Zbigniew Suchorab and Grzegorz Łagód
Buildings 2021, 11(11), 530; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11110530 - 10 Nov 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2345
Abstract
Biopolymers based on proteins are applied in the building materials technology to modify and improve their selected properties. These polymers are designed as natural admixtures that improve the workability of materials. Casein is an example of a protein-based organic polymer. It is a [...] Read more.
Biopolymers based on proteins are applied in the building materials technology to modify and improve their selected properties. These polymers are designed as natural admixtures that improve the workability of materials. Casein is an example of a protein-based organic polymer. It is a protein obtained from cow’s milk. The paper aimed at investigating the prospects of enhancing the strength properties of a binder prepared on a basis of metakaolin and hydrated lime. The mix was modified with powdered technical casein at 0.5%, 1%, 3%, and 5% as a partial replacement for the binder mix by mass. The study involved investigating the effect of the applied natural admixture on the flexural and compressive strengths, as well as pore size distribution. The average pore diameter decreased in the recipes with casein in the amount of 0.5% and 1%, while it increased when the amount of casein equaled 3% and 5%. Only the 0.5% casein admixture caused a decrease in the total porosity. The results show a clear dependence of the strength parameters on porosity. The admixture of casein significantly increased the flexural strength of the pastes, and decreased the compressive strength. The highest increase in flexural strength (by 205.7%) was caused by the admixture of 0.5% casein, while the greatest decrease in compressive strength (by 28%) was caused by the 3% casein admixture. The flexural strength was enhanced, i.a., due to the improved adhesion and mutual bonding of lime particles, resulting from the application of a sticky admixture. No notable difference was indicated during carbonation by the phenolphthalein test. The lime binder is characterized by a slow setting process and low mechanical strength. The results of the research showed the possibility of improving the flexural strength using small amounts of natural admixture, which may broaden the scope of application of this binder. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions of Chemicals with Building Materials)
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8 pages, 1117 KiB  
Article
Effect of Wood Hemicellulose Composition on Binding Interactions with Caffeine
by Klára Kobetičová and Jana Nábělková
Buildings 2021, 11(11), 515; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11110515 - 02 Nov 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2849
Abstract
Wood is one of the important construction materials and it is necessary to protect it from biological pests. Hemicellulose in wood consist of various sugar hexoses or pentoses depending on the tree species. This composition can have significant effects on interactions with chemical [...] Read more.
Wood is one of the important construction materials and it is necessary to protect it from biological pests. Hemicellulose in wood consist of various sugar hexoses or pentoses depending on the tree species. This composition can have significant effects on interactions with chemical substance as biocides or coatings. Interactions of glucose, arabinose, mannan, galactomannan, glucogalactomannan, xylan, and hemicellulose corresponding its structure in spruce, pine and beech with biocidal substance caffeine was studied in the present study. Chemical analyses were performed spectrometrically at the caffeine optimal wavelength of 287 nm. The results indicate variable rate of interactions between caffeine and the tested sugar monomers or polymers. The largest interactions between caffeine were observed for simple sugars glucose (71%) and arabinose (67%). Mannan and hemicellulose composted of mannan units had very low interactive potential with caffeine (1–9%), the models of woody plants showed no statistically significant difference (25–30%). Nevertheless, hemicellulose in some previous research showed less potential to bind caffeine than lignin, but greater than completely inactive cellulose. It is evident that the structure of individual sugars and their mixture in polymer hemicellulose has effects on binding interactions with caffeine; however, other research in this area will be necessary in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions of Chemicals with Building Materials)
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