Indoor Air Quality: Differences in Working Environments for Different Practitioners

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 964

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 400045, China
Interests: IAQ; thermal plume; health risk assessment; heating ventilation and air conditioning; thermal environment

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 400045, China
Interests: building energy saving; green building; HVAC system; building simulation; thermal comfort

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Energy and Environmental System Engineering, Zhejiang University of Science and Technology, Hangzhou 310023, China
Interests: indoor air quality; SVOC; mass transfer; exposure assessment; air cleaning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Indoor environments significantly affect human health, wellbeing, and productivity since people spend most of their time indoors. With economic growth, people not only pay attention to their living environment but also to the indoor environment of the workplace. Different types of work can lead to different indoor environmental conditions. Studying the indoor air quality of different working environments can help comprehensively optimize and improve the indoor environment, improve working efficiency, and ensure personal health.

The main aim of this Special Issue is to explore the recent challenges and developments of indoor air quality in working environments. Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Indoor air quality (IAQ) and health;
  • Health risk assessment;
  • Air purification and disinfection;
  • Indoor climate control;
  • Indoor pollutant exposure and health;
  • Air distribution;
  • Heat, mass, and moisture transfer;
  • Mechanical (heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration—HVAC&R) systems;
  • Pollutant emission, identification, and control.

Dr. Zhu Cheng
Dr. Hongli Sun
Dr. Zhongming Bu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • indoor air quality
  • built environment
  • thermal comfort
  • measurement
  • numerical method
  • built environment optimization

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 4935 KiB  
Article
Summer Thermal Challenges in Emergency Tents: Insights into Thermal Characteristics of Tents with Air Conditioning
by Mingli Xiang, Yuxuan Liao, Yonghong Jia, Wentao Zhang and Enshen Long
Buildings 2024, 14(3), 710; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14030710 - 7 Mar 2024
Viewed by 508
Abstract
Emergency tents face challenges in harsh weather conditions and sometimes require the use of air conditioning for indoor thermal environment control. However, their lightweight structure makes their control methods different from conventional buildings. This study focuses on the indoor thermal environment and thermal [...] Read more.
Emergency tents face challenges in harsh weather conditions and sometimes require the use of air conditioning for indoor thermal environment control. However, their lightweight structure makes their control methods different from conventional buildings. This study focuses on the indoor thermal environment and thermal comfort of air-conditioned tents during summer. Through experimental measurements, this study captures the distribution of air temperatures and inner surface temperatures within a tent, thus providing an understanding of the characteristics of indoor thermal environment in air-conditioned settings. Additionally, the numerical simulations conducted using the ANSYS FLUENT 2021 R1 calculate the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) and Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied (PPD), thus contributing to a detailed analysis of the indoor thermal comfort states. The experiment revealed that the mean radiative temperature (MRT) inside the tent can exceed the air temperature by more than 10 °C. Even when the air temperature is around 26 °C, the excessively high MRT can cause occupants to feel uncomfortable, with the PMV exceeding 1.4 and the PPD surpassing 50%. Furthermore, the high MRT results in an increased demand for cooling airflow, with the cooling loss through gaps becoming a significant part in the cooling load. To ensure a comfortable thermal environment, the air-conditioning set temperature needs to be adjusted according to the weather conditions. For instance, even at the same air temperature of 35 °C, when solar radiation increases from 400 W/m2 to 1000 W/m2, the set temperature needs to be reduced from 24.7 °C to 20.7 °C. The findings of this study provide an important reference for establishing summer air-conditioning strategies for emergency tents. Full article
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