Advances in Composite Construction in Civil Engineering

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 7117

Special Issue Editor

Louisiana Transportation Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
Interests: asphalt/concrete materials; pavement structural analysis; pavement M–E design and calibration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on the recent advancements of composite construction in civil engineering.

Composite construction in civil engineering involves the choice of materials for certain structures. The materials and structures in civil engineering are constantly being renewed to adapt to new requirements, and composite construction involves the use of complex materials and structures to replace the traditional ones. Innovations make it possible to improve a structure’s load capacity, lengthen a structure’s longevity, save energy, and become more environmentally friendly, etc.

Composite construction involves the interaction of two or more separate elements acting together and contributing together rather than separately. Relevent materials include those reinforced with fiber, polymers, or chemical additives. Composite structures include sandwiched layers, framed structures, and attachments, etc. Innovations in structures and materials are commonly related and coordinated to achieve the target performance level.

With the introduction of a novel composite materials or structure, the following questions need to be addressed: what is the performance improvement of the new composite construction? What is the mechanism of composite construction? What is the environmental or economic impact of composite construction? 

Scholars working in the area of composite construction are welcome to submit papers to answer these questions. This Special Issue offers a platform to showcase your findings, and will encourage the advancement of composite construction research among scholars worldwide.

Research areas may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Performance measurement or mechanical simulation
  • Interaction of materials or structural components
  • Formation analysis of composite materials
  • Longevity estimation
  • Environmental impact
  • Life cycle cost analysis (LCCA)

Dr. Hang Lu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polymer composites
  • structural capacity
  • property measurement
  • longevity estimation
  • life cycle cost analysis (LCCA)
  • mechanical analysis
  • numerical simulation
  • interface mechanics
  • construction technology
  • environmental impact

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

23 pages, 9284 KiB  
Article
Experimental Analysis of Mechanical Behavior of Timber-Concrete Composite Beams with Different Connecting Systems
by Radovan Cvetković, Slobodan Ranković, Tatjana Kočetov Mišulić and Danijel Kukaras
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010079 - 27 Dec 2023
Viewed by 743
Abstract
Timber-concrete composite structures are innovative structural systems which have become the subject of extensive research and practical usage, primarily due to their attractive mechanical properties. This article deals with the experimental procedure and the analysis of the mechanical behavior of two different series [...] Read more.
Timber-concrete composite structures are innovative structural systems which have become the subject of extensive research and practical usage, primarily due to their attractive mechanical properties. This article deals with the experimental procedure and the analysis of the mechanical behavior of two different series of timber-concrete composite beams with the same span and geometry of cross-sections. In the first BF-series, the screws were used as a connecting system between the timber and concrete parts, whereas in the BN-series the combination of notches and screws, as a more complex system, was used for the same purpose. Both series were exposed to loading up to a failure by means of the standard four-point bending test. The mechanical behavior of the BF and BN-series beams was analyzed by a comparative analysis referring to: the correlation of the failure loading and the deflection, mechanisms of failure, the strain development across the height of mid-span’s and support’s cross-sections, the horizontal displacement in the timber-concrete interlayer at the support zones, the value of shear stresses and the calculated values of the effective bending stiffness of the beams. The differences in bearing capacity between both series of beams were negligible (about 5%), the effective bending stiffness of BF beams is lower for 32.86% compared to the BN-series and the average value of deflections in BF-series beams is twice as high than in the BN-series. The BN-series beams showed better mechanical behavior in aspects of development of shear stresses in support zones, exhibiting lower shear stress values with an average of 40%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Construction in Civil Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 14970 KiB  
Article
Influences of Carbonated Recycled Concrete Fines on Cement Hydration
by Jiake Zhang, Liupeng Zhang, Boyang Xu and Jie Yuan
Buildings 2023, 13(4), 926; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13040926 - 31 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1363
Abstract
The preparation of recycled concrete aggregate generates a lot of fines, which are obstacles for implementing the recycled concrete aggregate. In this work, carbonation treatment is applied to improve the properties of recycled concrete fine, and the influences of carbonated recycled concrete fine [...] Read more.
The preparation of recycled concrete aggregate generates a lot of fines, which are obstacles for implementing the recycled concrete aggregate. In this work, carbonation treatment is applied to improve the properties of recycled concrete fine, and the influences of carbonated recycled concrete fine (CRCF) on cement hydration process are evaluated. Both fresh and hardened properties of the cement paste samples replacing 0 to 30% of the CRCF are measured. The results reveal that the addition of CRCF obviously accelerates the hydration process of cement, especially during the early stage, and the initial and final setting times of the cement paste containing 30% CRCF are both reduced by approximately 25% compared to the control. The CRCF improves the strength gain of cement, and that influence becomes obvious with longer curing; the relative compressive strength of cement paste containing 30% CRCF is increased by 18% relative to the control after being cured for 28 days. At the same time, the early hydration of cement paste is accelerated with the addition of CRCF and the total hydration heat after 48 h of cement paste is significantly decreased with the addition of CRCF. Specifically, the total hydration heat after 48 h of cement paste with 30% CRCF is less than 50% of that with 0% CRCF. Besides that, CRCF consumes CH in cement paste and improves the pore structure of hardened cement paste. The morphology of hydrated samples shows that the shape of ettringite formed within the control sample with 0% CRCF is longer than those of the other ones formed in cement paste with CRCF, and the length decreases as the CRCF contents increase. In addition, the sample containing 30% CRCF does not show the particles, which means that CRCF reduces the ettringite forming in hardened paste samples. Thus, the findings from this work provide a better understanding of the field of waste concrete reuse. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Construction in Civil Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 9507 KiB  
Article
Use of MD Simulation for Investigating Diffusion Behaviors between Virgin Asphalt and Recycled Asphalt Mastic
by Shuqi Chen, Qing Yang, Xin Qiu, Ke Liu, Shanglin Xiao and Wenyi Xu
Buildings 2023, 13(4), 862; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13040862 - 25 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1123
Abstract
The study aims at investigating diffusion behaviors between virgin asphalt and recycled asphalt mastic (RAM) at an atomistic scale. Firstly, a mutual diffusion model of virgin asphalt–RAM considering the actual mass ratio of filler to asphalt binder (F/A) condition was developed by molecular [...] Read more.
The study aims at investigating diffusion behaviors between virgin asphalt and recycled asphalt mastic (RAM) at an atomistic scale. Firstly, a mutual diffusion model of virgin asphalt–RAM considering the actual mass ratio of filler to asphalt binder (F/A) condition was developed by molecular dynamic (MD)simulation. Secondly, the indexes of relative concentration (RC), radial distribution function (RDF) and mean square displacement (MSD) were used to analyze the molecular arrangement characteristics of polar components in the diffusion processes at different temperatures. Then, the blending efficiency of virgin asphalt–RAM was evaluated by Fick’s second law and the binding energy. The results indicate that the reliability of the RAM model was validated by thermodynamics properties. The results of RC and RDF show that the diffusion direction of virgin asphalt–RAM is not changed by the presence of mineral fillers. However, it will inhibit the occurrence of diffusion behaviors, and the aggregation of molecules in the blending zone increases due to the adsorption of mineral fillers, which would become a barrier to molecular diffusion. The development of MSD indicates that the diffusion coefficients of molecules in both virgin–aged asphalt and virgin asphalt–RAM are on the rise with the increase in temperature. Compared with the virgin–aged asphalt, the molecular migration speed in virgin asphalt–RAM is relatively slow. According to Fick’s second law and the binding energy, diffusion behaviors are dominated by the nonpolar components. The existence of mineral fillers has the greatest effect on the nonpolar components in diffusion. It is suggested that rejuvenator containing more aromatic components should be added or the temperature controlled within 433.15–443.15 K to promote blending efficiency. The research results contribute to a deeper understanding about diffusion behaviors of virgin asphalt–RAM, serving as a benchmark for further study of rejuvenation using computational experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Construction in Civil Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 8685 KiB  
Article
Horizontal Distribution of Temperature Effect in Rubberized Concrete Pavement: A Case Study
by Gaowang Zhang, Jiake Zhang, Jie Yuan and Shijiang Ye
Buildings 2023, 13(3), 686; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13030686 - 06 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1297
Abstract
Temperature distribution and the deformation behavior under temperature are important parameters in the design and evaluation of concrete pavements. In this paper, in order to study the horizontal distribution of the temperature effect on rubberized concrete pavement (RCP), the distribution differences of temperature, [...] Read more.
Temperature distribution and the deformation behavior under temperature are important parameters in the design and evaluation of concrete pavements. In this paper, in order to study the horizontal distribution of the temperature effect on rubberized concrete pavement (RCP), the distribution differences of temperature, temperature gradient and strain at different horizontal locations were analyzed based on fiber Bragg grating test technology. The relationships between temperature and strain and between temperature gradient and strain were also investigated. The results show that within a cycle of temperature or temperature gradient change, the time of temperature increase or temperature gradient increase is only 1/4 of the whole cycle, significantly less than the time of the temperature or temperature gradient decrease. Comparing the center, edges and corner of the pavement, the horizontal distribution of temperature and temperature gradients in the RCP is uneven, and the greatest negative temperature gradient is experienced at the corner of the pavement, which is 25 °C·m−1 greater than the temperature gradient at the center. The negative temperature gradient at the corner of the concrete pavement exacerbates the bottom deformation at the center and edge of the pavement, especially in the X-axis direction at the center and in the Y-axis and Z-axis directions at the edge. The relationships between temperature and horizontal strain at the center and edge of the RCP have a significant hysteresis effect and are markedly stronger than those at the corner. Moreover, when the temperature gradient is less than −23.4 °C·m−1 or greater than 14.5 °C·m−1, the curling effect at the edge of the RCP is more obvious. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Construction in Civil Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 4626 KiB  
Article
Study on the Properties and Benefits of a Composite Separator Layer in Airport Cement Concrete Pavement
by Hang Lu, Ce Zhao, Jie Yuan, Wei Yin, Yanhai Wang and Rui Xiao
Buildings 2022, 12(12), 2190; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12122190 - 10 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1466
Abstract
A composite separator layer in Portland cement concrete pavement, formed by a lower bearing layer and micro surfacing, was seldom used in airport pavement, but it has great application potential. This paper studied the properties of the composite separator layer and its benefits [...] Read more.
A composite separator layer in Portland cement concrete pavement, formed by a lower bearing layer and micro surfacing, was seldom used in airport pavement, but it has great application potential. This paper studied the properties of the composite separator layer and its benefits for pavement. The basic properties investigated in the study were resilient modulus and interlayer property between the separator layer and concrete. The resilient modulus of the micro surfacing was tested to calculate the modulus of the whole separation layer. The interlayer shearing test was done on core specimens using a self-developed facility that can apply load in the normal direction. Shearing test results show that temperature affects the shape of the shearing curve and normal stress linearly affects the stable shear force. Additionally, an in-situ erosion test was carried out to prove the anti-scouring property of the separator layer. Furthermore, a finite element model (FEM) model was established to study the influence of the composite separator layer. The FEM employed the modulus test results and the measured interlayer characteristic. The interlayer characteristic was simplified into a two-stage constitutional model. Monitored data on the mechanical response of the pavement structure in an airport validated the FEM model. Results show that the separator layer reduces the chance of contraction crack under the sudden temperature drop in the concrete slab before sawing. FEM results show that though the separator layer slightly increases the tensile stress of concrete, the tensile stress is greatly reduced if the slab develops voids in the future. The most significant benefit of the separation layer is it reduces the chance of void occurrence so that the lifespan of pavement with a separator layer is improved compared to regular pavements which frequently have voids beneath the slab. With the finite element model results and cumulative fatigue life equations, the separator layer was estimated to elongate the pavement service life for years, depending on the time voids appear. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Construction in Civil Engineering)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop