Sustainable and Smart Energy Systems in the Built Environment

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 June 2024 | Viewed by 3278

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department DEIM, Tuscia University, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Interests: sustainability; energy modelling; energy policies; sector coupling and interactions

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Escuela de Ingenierías Industrial, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Valparaíso 2340000, Chile
Interests: energy modelling; optimisation; digitalisation; energy transition; energy policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Society and energy systems are changing more rapidly than ever, and yet more is still to come. This transition, led by renewable energy sources and technologies, is affecting all sectors of our society. Energy systems are becoming more interconnected and complex, and it is of the utmost importance to be able to properly analyse and exploit all the potential synergies offered by such interconnection towards a smart energy system, so as to maximize the use of renewable energy while minimizing the overall system cost and emissions.

The built environment is a central part of today’s energy systems and as such requires a specific attention, and this is why it represents the main topic of this Special Issue; however, such complexity requires a multi-level analysis, so research at different scales that is able to underline the centrality of buildings and the built environment is welcomed for submission.

We welcome papers on the topics including but not limited to:

  • energy modelling and planning;
  • sector coupling solutions;
  • demand side management;
  • energy efficiency;
  • decarbonization and electrification;
  • grid-interactive efficient buildings;
  • flexible buildings;
  • building-to-grid integration;
  • building information modeling;
  • sustainable buildings and cities;
  • energy systems optimization;
  • positive energy districts;
  • new technologies for renewable energy applications and storage;
  • digital twins and artificial intelligence.

Dr. Daniele Groppi
Dr. Felipe Feijoo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • smart energy system
  • energy modelling
  • energy planning
  • sustainable buildings and cities
  • flexible buildings
  • digitalisation
  • artificial intelligence
  • positive energy districts

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

25 pages, 3567 KiB  
Article
Harnessing Deep Learning and Reinforcement Learning Synergy as a Form of Strategic Energy Optimization in Architectural Design: A Case Study in Famagusta, North Cyprus
by Hirou Karimi, Mohammad Anvar Adibhesami, Siamak Hoseinzadeh, Ali Salehi, Daniele Groppi and Davide Astiaso Garcia
Buildings 2024, 14(5), 1342; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14051342 - 9 May 2024
Viewed by 484
Abstract
This study introduces a novel framework that leverages artificial intelligence (AI), specifically deep learning and reinforcement learning, to enhance energy efficiency in architectural design. The goal is to identify architectural arrangements that maximize energy efficiency. The complexity of these models is acknowledged, and [...] Read more.
This study introduces a novel framework that leverages artificial intelligence (AI), specifically deep learning and reinforcement learning, to enhance energy efficiency in architectural design. The goal is to identify architectural arrangements that maximize energy efficiency. The complexity of these models is acknowledged, and an in-depth analysis of model selection, their inherent complexity, and the hyperparameters that govern their operation is conducted. This study validates the scalability of these models by comparing them with traditional optimization techniques like genetic algorithms and simulated annealing. The proposed system exhibits superior scalability, adaptability, and computational efficiency. This research study also explores the ethical and societal implications of integrating AI with architectural design, including potential impacts on human creativity, public welfare, and personal privacy. This study acknowledges it is in its preliminary stage and identifies its potential limitations, setting the stage for future research to enhance and expand the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. The findings indicate that the model can steer the architectural field towards sustainability, with a demonstrated reduction in energy usage of up to 20%. This study also conducts a thorough analysis of the ethical implications of AI in architecture, emphasizing the balance between technological advancement and human creativity. In summary, this research study presents a groundbreaking approach to energy-efficient architectural design using AI, with promising results and wide-ranging applicability. It also thoughtfully addresses the ethical considerations and potential societal impacts of this technological integration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable and Smart Energy Systems in the Built Environment)
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 3200 KiB  
Article
Energy and Economic Advantages of Using Solar Stills for Renewable Energy-Based Multi-Generation of Power and Hydrogen for Residential Buildings
by Armida Bahrami, Fatemeh Soltanifar, Pourya Fallahi, Sara S. Meschi and Ali Sohani
Buildings 2024, 14(4), 1041; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14041041 - 8 Apr 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 595
Abstract
The multi-generation systems with simultaneous production of power by renewable energy, in addition to polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzer and fuel cell (PEMFC-PEMEC) energy storage, have become more and more popular over the past few years. The fresh water provision for PEMECs in such [...] Read more.
The multi-generation systems with simultaneous production of power by renewable energy, in addition to polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzer and fuel cell (PEMFC-PEMEC) energy storage, have become more and more popular over the past few years. The fresh water provision for PEMECs in such systems is taken into account as one of the main challenges for them, where conventional desalination technologies such as reverse osmosis (RO) and mechanical vapor compression (MVC) impose high electricity consumption and costs. Taking this point into consideration, as a novelty, solar still (ST) desalination is applied as an alternative to RO and MVC for better techno-economic justifiability. The comparison, made for a residential building complex in Hawaii in the US as the case study demonstrated much higher technical and economic benefits when using ST compared with both MVC and RO. The photovoltaic (PV) installed capacity decreased by 11.6 and 7.3 kW compared with MVC and RO, while the size of the electrolyzer declined by 9.44 and 6.13%, and the hydrogen storage tank became 522.1 and 319.3 m3 smaller, respectively. Thanks to the considerable drop in the purchase price of components, the payback period (PBP) dropped by 3.109 years compared with MVC and 2.801 years compared with RO, which is significant. Moreover, the conducted parametric study implied the high technical and economic viability of the system with ST for a wide range of building loads, including high values. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable and Smart Energy Systems in the Built Environment)
Show Figures

Figure 1

33 pages, 17156 KiB  
Article
Application of PCM in a Zero-Energy Building and Using a CCHP System Based on Geothermal Energy in Canada and the UAE
by Ehsanolah Assareh, Abolfazl Keykhah, Siamak Hoseinzadeh and Davide Astiaso Garcia
Buildings 2024, 14(2), 477; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14020477 - 8 Feb 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 688
Abstract
In this research, the optimization of energy consumption of zero-energy buildings using PCMs in the two study cities of Vancouver and Dubai and its energy supply with a multi-generation geothermal system is discussed. PCMs used in the walls and roofs of designed buildings [...] Read more.
In this research, the optimization of energy consumption of zero-energy buildings using PCMs in the two study cities of Vancouver and Dubai and its energy supply with a multi-generation geothermal system is discussed. PCMs used in the walls and roofs of designed buildings are of two types, namely PCM (solid) and PCM (liquid). By optimizing the energy consumption of the residential complex in two study cities, it is finally possible to choose the best mode in optimal conditions to reduce energy consumption in the residential complex, reduce the costs of the residential complex, and reduce the environmental pollution. The results showed that the amount of electricity consumption, heating, and cooling of the residential complex during the year in the city of Vancouver is 8493.55, 7899.1, and 1083.97 kWh, respectively, and in the city of Dubai, the values are 9572.1, 8.99, and 18,845.44 kW, respectively. Also, by optimizing the energy consumption of residential complexes in Vancouver and Dubai, it is possible to reduce CO2 emissions by 2129.7 and 2773.2 kg/year, respectively. The electricity consumption of the residential complex in Dubai is 11.26% and the carbon dioxide emission is 23.20% more. In the end, a multi-generation system is proposed to meet the energy consumption of a six-unit zero-energy residential complex with 120 m2 and two bedrooms in Vancouver, Canada. By setting up the study system in the city of Vancouver, 237,364.6 kWh of electricity, 425,959.4 kWh of heating, and 304,732.8 kWh of electricity can be produced in one year. According to the investigation, the geothermal system can easily provide the energy consumption required by residential buildings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable and Smart Energy Systems in the Built Environment)
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 5134 KiB  
Article
A 4E Comparative Study between BIPV and BIPVT Systems in Order to Achieve Zero-Energy Building in Cold Climate
by Ramtin Javadijam, Mohammad Hassan Shahverdian, Ali Sohani and Hoseyn Sayyaadi
Buildings 2023, 13(12), 3028; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13123028 - 5 Dec 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 819
Abstract
The growing demand for energy has led to the popularity of building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) systems. However, photovoltaic (PV) system efficiency decreases as the temperature increases. To address this issue, a study was conducted on a BIPV thermal (BIPVT) system, which can generate [...] Read more.
The growing demand for energy has led to the popularity of building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) systems. However, photovoltaic (PV) system efficiency decreases as the temperature increases. To address this issue, a study was conducted on a BIPV thermal (BIPVT) system, which can generate both thermal and electrical energy, to enhance its efficiency. In this study, for the cold weather in Tabriz city in Iran, BIPV and BIPVT systems are compared with each other in terms of energy, economy, exergy, and environment (4E) and the goal is to fully supply the thermal and electrical load of the desired building. The studied criteria are electrical power and heat recovery, payback time (PBT), exergy efficiency, and saved carbon dioxide (SCD) from the energy, economic, exergy, and environmental point of view, respectively. Finally, it is concluded that in cold weather, the BIPVT system can achieve a 7.15% improvement in produced power compared to the BIPV system and 52.2% of the building’s heating needs are provided. It also causes the exergy efficiency to improve by an average of 1.69% and saves 34.98 ton of carbon dioxide. The PBT of this study is calculated as 5.77 years for the BIPV system and 4.78 years for the BIPVT system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable and Smart Energy Systems in the Built Environment)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop