Research on Advanced Technologies Applied in Green Buildings

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 3591

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Construction Department, School of Technology, Universidad de Extremadura, 10600 Plasencia, Spain
Interests: building simulation; digital twins

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Construcción, Instalaciones y Estructuras, Universidad de Navarra, 31009 Pamplona, Spain
Interests: facilities design for buildings; building fire protection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We cordially invite you to participate in our Special Issue entitled "Research on Advanced Technologies Applied in Green Buildings". This issue aims to highlight innovative research and technological advances that contribute to the creation of more sustainable and energy efficient buildings.

In this Special Issue, we are interested in exploring the potential of advanced technologies in the field of building energy simulation, focusing on areas such as artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things (IoT), advanced monitoring, energy management systems, and the use of eco-efficient materials. We would also like to address the role of integrated renewable energy systems in the construction and operation of sustainable buildings.

We encourage you to submit your original contributions that focus on these themes or related areas. Your participation in this Special Issue will be an invaluable opportunity to share and discuss the latest advances and research results in advanced technologies applied to sustainable buildings.

The deadline for submitting articles is 10 January 2024. More details about the submission process and requirements can be found on the website of our Buildings journal, or you can contact me directly.

We sincerely appreciate your interest and look forward to your valuable contribution to making this Special Issue a success. We also invite you to share this invitation among your colleagues and any researchers who may be interested in participating.

Kind regards,

Dr. Carlos Fernández Bandera
Prof. Dr. Juan Bautista Echeverría
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advanced technologies
  • sustainable buildings
  • energy efficiency
  • simulation and modeling
  • artificial intelligence (AI)
  • Internet of Things (IoT)
  • energy management systems
  • renewable energy integration
  • smart sensors and monitoring
  • eco-efficient materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 2632 KiB  
Article
Infiltration Models in EnergyPlus: Empirical Assessment for a Case Study in a Seven-Story Building
by Gabriela Bastos Porsani, María Fernández-Vigil Iglesias, Juan Bautista Echeverría Trueba and Carlos Fernández Bandera
Buildings 2024, 14(2), 421; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14020421 - 3 Feb 2024
Viewed by 687
Abstract
The current decarbonization transition to be achieved by 2050 according to the European Council has given great prominence to the use of Digital Twins as tools for energy management. For their correct operation, it is essential to control the uncertainties of the energy [...] Read more.
The current decarbonization transition to be achieved by 2050 according to the European Council has given great prominence to the use of Digital Twins as tools for energy management. For their correct operation, it is essential to control the uncertainties of the energy models, which lead to differences between the measured and predicted data. One of the key parameters that is most difficult to assess numerically is air leakage. The existent infiltration models available in EnergyPlus were developed to be applied in low-rise residential buildings with fewer than three stories. Therefore, it is common to rely on air leakage equations employing predefined coefficients. This research presents an empirical assessment of the performance of two EnergyPlus air leakage models, the “Effective Leakage Area” and the “Flow Coefficient”, in predicting dynamic infiltration within the attic of a seven-story building. Blower door tests, along with the application of CO2 tracer gas, were conducted to establish coefficients for the models. Then, they were evaluated in three independent periods according to the criteria established in the American Society for Testing Material D5157 Standard. Those models that only used in situ coefficients consistently met the standard across all three periods, demonstrating for both equations their accurate performance and reliability. For the best model derived from tracer gas data, the R2 and NMSE values are 0.94 and 0.019, respectively. In contrast, the model developed using blower door test data and EnergyPlus default values presented a 64% reduction in accuracy compared to the best one. This discrepancy could potentially lead to misleading energy estimates. Although other software options exist for estimating infiltration, this study specifically targets EnergyPlus users. Therefore, these findings offer valuable insights to make more informed decisions when implementing the infiltration models into energy simulations for high-rise buildings using EnergyPlus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Advanced Technologies Applied in Green Buildings)
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29 pages, 10410 KiB  
Article
Optimising Daylight and Ventilation Performance: A Building Envelope Design Methodology
by Rana Abdollahi Rizi, Hamed Sangin, Kiana Haghighatnejad Chobari, Ahmad Eltaweel and Robyn Phipps
Buildings 2023, 13(11), 2840; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13112840 - 13 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1547
Abstract
The future of building envelope design lies in smart adaptation. The current literature overlooks the crucial integration of airflow, ventilation and daylighting in adaptive façade design. Moreover, it neglects the occupants’ locations, activities and interior layouts in this context. This study introduces an [...] Read more.
The future of building envelope design lies in smart adaptation. The current literature overlooks the crucial integration of airflow, ventilation and daylighting in adaptive façade design. Moreover, it neglects the occupants’ locations, activities and interior layouts in this context. This study introduces an innovative approach to adaptive building envelope design, aiming to enhance occupants’ comfort through parametric analysis of daylight and airflow. The research combines parametric simulation, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and multiobjective optimisation. The optimisation goal is to improve visual comfort and indoor air quality while maintaining air temperature and velocity within the human comfort range. The study contributes to providing designers with a method for building envelope design that considers visual comfort and airflow, resulting in more interactive building envelopes that are adaptable to environmental conditions for enhanced utility and comfort. Results indicated that the optimised façade configuration and design methodology can achieve a 69% improvement in daylight performance, improving useful daylight illuminance (UDI) while reducing glare risk. Additionally, air changes per hour (ACH) showed a 38% annual improvement. This research signifies a significant step towards more efficient and occupant-centric building envelope design, aligning with the evolving demands of the construction industry and sustainable building practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Advanced Technologies Applied in Green Buildings)
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25 pages, 8594 KiB  
Article
A Methodology for Designing an Automated System to Improve the Thermal Performance of a Large Building in Operation
by Beatriz Montalbán Pozas, Marta Lucas Bonilla, Francisco Serrano Candela and Pablo Bustos García de Castro
Buildings 2023, 13(8), 1938; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13081938 - 29 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1062
Abstract
Many buildings built before energy performance regulations are actually in a situation of thermal discomfort and energy inefficiency. The creation of intelligent environments is moving towards new opportunities, based on real-time monitoring and on the development of sensors and technologies. Furthermore, building automation [...] Read more.
Many buildings built before energy performance regulations are actually in a situation of thermal discomfort and energy inefficiency. The creation of intelligent environments is moving towards new opportunities, based on real-time monitoring and on the development of sensors and technologies. Furthermore, building automation and electronic systems standards enable interoperability and interconnection between control devices and systems. The application of soft computing has significantly improved the energy efficiency; however, it requires prior assessment to design the automation functions. Temperature, humidity, air quality and energy consumption are the most commonly measured parameters, but their relationships with other operational variables such as occupancy or some building states remain as a research challenge. This article presents a methodology to develop the automation of a large existing public building. This methodology consists of two stages: 1. Assessment and diagnosis to set appropriate functions, using EN ISO 52120-1 and EN 50090 for open communication networks, and EN ISO 52120-1 to assign the technical building management. 2. System control deployment of low-cost and low-consumption input and output devices. It has been proven that it is possible to effectively automate an obsolete building with a low-cost, open-source system that can be easily applied to other buildings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Advanced Technologies Applied in Green Buildings)
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