Research on Daylight and Visual Comfort in Buildings and Cities

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 3589

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Laboratory of Integrated Performance in Design LIPID, Lausanne, Switzerland
Interests: daylighting; visual comfort; HDR-imaging; integrated design; zero energy buildings

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Guest Editor
TEBE Research Group, Department of Energy “Galileo Ferraris”, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Turin, Italy
Interests: daylighting; electric lighting; visual comfort; indoor environmental quality; non-visual effects of light; innovative façade; building simulation

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Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples 'Federico II', 80138 Napoli, NA, Italy
Interests: daylighting; daylight-linked controls; electric light; indoor environmental quality; integrative lighting

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Daylighting is acknowledged as a strategic topic in the frame of achieving sustainable buildings, as it plays a major role in the comfort and health of the occupants and energy savings. Daylighting and solar gains are strongly interconnected: indoor environmental quality is directly affected by the amount of solar radiation admitted into a space. This can cause glare and overheating problems, but have a beneficial role in the heat energy balance in winter. As for health and well-being aspects, research has shown that daylight, with its variability in terms of intensity and spectrum, is crucial in stimulating the human circadian system, therefore influencing ‘human factors’ such as sleep quality, sleepiness and vitality, alertness and productivity.

The challenge for building practitioners is to find an optimum between daylight provision and view, glare control, overheating protection and health and well-being-related aspects while promoting energy-saving targets. Such approaches need to include both indoor and outdoor conditions.

In this frame, this special issue ‘Research on Daylight and Visual Comfort in Buildings and Cities’ welcomes research papers (including theoretical, simulation, subjective and experimental studies) that are related to (but not limited to) the following topics:

  • Daylighting in buildings;
  • Daylight usage in urban and dense environments;
  • Visual comfort in the built environment (daylighting and/or artificial lighting);
  • (Day)lighting and its impact on comfort, health and/or well-being;
  • (Day)lighting and energy use;
  • Innovative façade and glazing developments and their impact on daylight usage.

Dr. Jan Wienold
Dr. Valerio Roberto Maria Lo Verso
Prof. Dr. Laura Bellia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • daylighting in buildings
  • daylight usage in urban environments
  • visual comfort
  • non-visual effects of light
  • integrative lighting
  • innovative daylight components
  • daylight and energy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 6853 KiB  
Article
Daylight Availability of Living Rooms in Dense Residential Areas under Current Planning Regulations: A Cross-Region Case Study in China
by Lishu Hong, Chenxi Wang and Xin Zhang
Buildings 2024, 14(4), 1090; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14041090 - 13 Apr 2024
Viewed by 697
Abstract
After the pandemic, as it becomes more feasible to study and work from home, the quality of residential daylighting has attracted increasing attention. With the rapid growth of high-density residential areas, China is confronted with the incoordination between site planning and interior daylight [...] Read more.
After the pandemic, as it becomes more feasible to study and work from home, the quality of residential daylighting has attracted increasing attention. With the rapid growth of high-density residential areas, China is confronted with the incoordination between site planning and interior daylight availability across a wide region. Therefore, this paper investigates the applicability of planning regulations for daylight availability in dense residential areas under different climates across China, with the aim of providing data to optimize design strategies. ClimateStudio and ALFA were used to calculate the daylight factor (DF), daylight illuminance, spatial daylight autonomy (sDA), useful daylight illuminance (UDI), and melanopic equivalent daylight illuminance (m-EDI) of living rooms in four practical mixed housing estates in different Chinese daylight climate zones. The results showed that most of the studied units failed to meet current standards of DF and sDA300,50% for residence. However, more than half of these units still had high potential for UDI and met the recommendation of m-EDI by daylight only. The results verified the importance of integrative consideration of the local daylight climate and interior unit design for residential area layout planning. Finally, this paper suggests two topics for further exploration to bridge the gap between area planning and interior daylight availability in dense residential areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Daylight and Visual Comfort in Buildings and Cities)
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23 pages, 7934 KiB  
Article
A Field Study of Individual, Energy-Efficient, and Human-Centered Indoor Electric Lighting: Its Impact on Comfort and Visual Performance in an Open-Plan Office Part 1
by Sevda Aliparast and Sermin Onaygil
Buildings 2024, 14(4), 936; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14040936 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 539
Abstract
In this field study, we examined the impact of human-centered lighting on an open-plan office environment, involving the participation of sixty office workers. The objective was to investigate the effects of the Circadian Stimulus (CS) and Equivalent Melanopic Lux (EML) metrics. This study [...] Read more.
In this field study, we examined the impact of human-centered lighting on an open-plan office environment, involving the participation of sixty office workers. The objective was to investigate the effects of the Circadian Stimulus (CS) and Equivalent Melanopic Lux (EML) metrics. This study took place at Istanbul Technical University in Istanbul, Turkey. The office was equipped with single Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) light emitting diode (LED) sources, featuring two different light beam distributions: Direct Suspended Linear (L1) and Direct and Indirect Suspended Linear (L2). To minimize energy consumption, we proposed simulations for a suspended individual lighting system. The office workers were invited to complete visual cognitive performance tests, proofreading tasks, and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) test to measure alertness. Additionally, participants were asked to provide feedback on the comfort criteria associated with the designed human-centered lighting concept. The preliminary findings from part 1 of this field study shed light on the potential of office lighting modifications in enhancing energy efficiency and meeting the standards set by WELL v2 2023 Q4 and UL Design Guideline 24480 (2019). Part 2 of this study will further optimize the proposed lighting quality concept to determine the most suitable individual lighting solution for office workers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Daylight and Visual Comfort in Buildings and Cities)
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17 pages, 6441 KiB  
Article
Research on Dynamic Monitoring and Optimization of Lighting Environment in Clothing Workshop Based on Visual Comfort
by Wanjun Hou, Liu Liu, Hui Xi and Tie Jia
Buildings 2024, 14(3), 750; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14030750 - 11 Mar 2024
Viewed by 543
Abstract
T8 LED tubes with adjustable brightness and color temperature are installed in the workshop for workers to adjust their lighting independently. The illuminance of the workers’ working surface is dynamically monitored for one year, and the collected illuminance data are quantitatively analyzed to [...] Read more.
T8 LED tubes with adjustable brightness and color temperature are installed in the workshop for workers to adjust their lighting independently. The illuminance of the workers’ working surface is dynamically monitored for one year, and the collected illuminance data are quantitatively analyzed to explore the suitable illuminance threshold and color temperature preference for workers in real scenes. The illuminance value is divided according to time period and season, which provides reference for the development of intelligent buildings. For the three workflows in the post-finishing workshop, the lighting environment was optimized based on the uniformity of illumination, and the optimal height of the lighting arrangement was determined. The optimal luminaire placement height for the bar tacking machine was found to be 1.28 m, for the auxiliary workbench it was 1.02 m, and for the ironing table it was 1.2 m. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Daylight and Visual Comfort in Buildings and Cities)
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25 pages, 7373 KiB  
Article
Integrative Lighting in Classrooms: Preliminary Results from Simulations and Field Measurements
by Valerio R. M. Lo Verso, Luigi Giovannini, Lodovica Valetti and Anna Pellegrino
Buildings 2023, 13(9), 2128; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13092128 - 22 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1034
Abstract
The paper presents results from a study on integrative lighting in real middle school classrooms located in a school building in Turin, Italy. The contribution of both daylighting and electric lighting was considered. Besides the existing configuration of electric lighting systems (fluorescent luminaires), [...] Read more.
The paper presents results from a study on integrative lighting in real middle school classrooms located in a school building in Turin, Italy. The contribution of both daylighting and electric lighting was considered. Besides the existing configuration of electric lighting systems (fluorescent luminaires), a set of six possible retrofitting solutions was considered, all using LED luminaires. The research addressed two main objectives: (i) To verify if the circadian values (melanopic equivalent daylight illuminance m-EDI) in the classrooms could meet the recommended values reported in recent literature, for instance, in the WELL protocol, (ii) to assess the influence on integrative lighting (photopic and melanopic illuminances) played by the electric lighting, as a function of the different lighting systems, and by daylighting, as a function of different room orientations and sky conditions. Results showed that the existing spaces benefit from high daylighting amount, whilst the existing lighting systems provide an insufficient m-EDI. Even when last-generation LED lighting systems were ideally used for retrofitting, no solution was able to meet the three-point WELL recommendation, while two solutions only allowed the one-point recommendation to be met. Some design implications concerned with the results were critically discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Daylight and Visual Comfort in Buildings and Cities)
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