Urban Climatic Suitability Design and Risk Management

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 2651

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China
Interests: urban climatic prediction; human thermal comfort evaluation; environmental suitability assessment; adaptation analysis of management decisions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Architecture and Planning, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091, China
Interests: urban thermal environment; parametric design and optimization; performance-based design; spatial analysis; building simulation

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Biochemical Engineering, Beijing Union University, Beijing 100101, China
Interests: urban local climate; thermal comfort; urban thermal environment simulation; regional carbon emissions

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China
Interests: thermal comfort; intelligent control method for air conditioners
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urban climate seems to comprise the outcomes of rapid urbanization, large population size and complex human behavior. In particular, urban style and the features of nature and humanity make the urban climate a unique identity with spatio-temporal characteristics. A series of environmental and energy risks created by the urban climate are continually being discovered. The excessive utilization of air conditioning and large amounts of anthropogenic heat led to prominent urban heat islands and high-temperature thermal safety issues. The accompanying energy consumption is closely associated with a high level of carbon emissions. Considering the emerging issues of the urban climate, this Special Issue explores advanced technologies or theories to contribute to urban climatic sustainability design and risk management.

The Guest Editors cordially welcome high-quality papers focusing on, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Field measurement or numerical modeling of urban climate at different scales.
  • Human thermal comfort and thermal safety risk assessment and management.
  • Mathematical models of urban heat balance theory.
  • Effects of urban morphology and underlying surface materials on urban climate.
  • Climate-sensitive health risk prediction and urban design.
  • Sustainability assessment of urban climate.
  • Air quality modeling analysis and risk management.
  • Urban flood disaster prediction and management.
  • Effective management modes applied in urban governance.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Dr. Lin Liu
Dr. Genyu Xu
Dr. Jing Du
Dr. Xiaoyu Tian
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban climate
  • sustainable urban design
  • risk assessment and management
  • thermal comfort
  • thermal safety
  • urban wind and thermal environment
  • solar radiation modeling

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

27 pages, 11195 KiB  
Article
Strategies for Mitigating Urban Residential Carbon Emissions: A System Dynamics Analysis of Kunming, China
by Jian Xu, Yujia Qian, Bingyue He, Huixuan Xiang, Ran Ling and Genyu Xu
Buildings 2024, 14(4), 982; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14040982 - 2 Apr 2024
Viewed by 708
Abstract
To effectively combat environmental challenges, it is necessary to evaluate urban residential building carbon emissions and implement energy-efficient, emission-reducing strategies. The lack of a specialized carbon emission monitoring system complicates merging macro- and micro-level analyses to forecast urban residential emissions accurately. This study [...] Read more.
To effectively combat environmental challenges, it is necessary to evaluate urban residential building carbon emissions and implement energy-efficient, emission-reducing strategies. The lack of a specialized carbon emission monitoring system complicates merging macro- and micro-level analyses to forecast urban residential emissions accurately. This study employs a system dynamics (SD) model to examine the influence of social, economic, energy, and environmental factors on carbon emissions in urban residences in Kunming, China. The SD model forecasts household carbon emissions from 2022 to 2030 and establishes three scenarios: a low-carbon scenario (LCS), a medium low-carbon scenario (MLCS), and a high low-carbon scenario (HLCS) to assess emission reduction potentials. It predicts emissions will climb to 4.108 million tons by 2030, significantly surpassing the 2014 baseline, with economic growth, urbanization, residential energy consumption, and housing investment as key drivers. To curb emissions, the study suggests enhancing low-carbon awareness, altering energy sources, promoting research and development investment, and expanding green areas. The scenarios indicate a 5.1% to 16.1% emission reduction by 2030 compared to the baseline. The study recommends an 8.3% to 11.4% reduction in MLCS as a practical short-term target for managing urban residential emissions, offering a valuable SD approach for optimizing carbon strategies and aiding low-carbon development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Climatic Suitability Design and Risk Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

22 pages, 6617 KiB  
Article
Mist Spraying as an Outdoor Cooling Spot in Hot-Humid Areas: Effect of Ambient Environment and Impact on Short-Term Thermal Perception
by Pin Wang, Sumei Lu, Xiaowei Wu, Jun Tian and Ning Li
Buildings 2024, 14(2), 336; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14020336 - 25 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1458
Abstract
Mist spraying is an active cooling technology used to alleviate heat stress during hot summers. However, there is limited experimental research on the relationship between ambient thermal parameters and spray cooling efficiency, as well as the transient and short-term thermal perceptions of local [...] Read more.
Mist spraying is an active cooling technology used to alleviate heat stress during hot summers. However, there is limited experimental research on the relationship between ambient thermal parameters and spray cooling efficiency, as well as the transient and short-term thermal perceptions of local residents. In this study, an intermittent mist spraying system was set up, and environmental measurements, coupled with questionnaire surveys, were conducted under typical high temperature and still air conditions. The aim was to investigate the relationship among environmental factors, spray cooling effects, and dynamic improvements in human thermal perception. The results showed that higher ambient temperatures resulted in a more significant cooling effect, with a maximum value of 5.68 °C. Upon entering the spraying area, people experienced a large perceptual change, with the mean thermal sensation and thermal comfort change covering 73% and 62% of the total change ranges, respectively. This study indicated that the mist spray system can be activated if the ambient temperature exceeds 32.5 °C, helping local residents maintain a physiological state close to slightly hot and neutral comfort. These findings suggest that mist spraying can be applied in environmental design as an outdoor cooling spot to mitigate urban overheating, providing valuable insights for the application of mist spray systems in actual outdoor settings in hot-humid areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Climatic Suitability Design and Risk Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop